Tell us what you know: Indian vetiver (NOT Ruh Khus)

    Tell us what you know: Indian vetiver (NOT Ruh Khus)

    post #1 of 4
    Thread Starter 
    This is the place where you can discuss everything about Indian vetiver impressions, best sources and suppliers, general tips, etc.
    post #2 of 4
    Thread Starter 
    Wild Indian Vetiver CO2 essential oil, White Lotus Aromatics

    A dark yellowish-brown liquid that’s thick like molasses. It’s considerably nutty but there’s nothing else particularly distinctive about it. It’s also very difficult to detect beyond the first few minutes after application (although it does seem to last for quite a while). Almost lifeless on the skin for the entirety of its duration, it just wallows in a mire of dullness. Very disappointing.
    post #3 of 4
    Thread Starter 

    Indian Vetiver essential oil, Eden Botanicals

    It's initially very similar to the Indonesian variety but less harsh and fuller-bodied. With a smoky yeast aroma, a prominent burnt malt aspect intensifies its overall charred denseness. But unlike Javanese vetiver oil, this stage is almost relentless and takes much longer to reveal other nuances.

    As the charred denseness slowly subsides, its smokiness resembles castoreum absolute but grittier. And when its intensity finally calms down, a subtle creamy sweetness emerges. Those Marmite tones still remain but, by this stage, it smells more harmonious and alluring.

    Overall, it's a lot better than the one from White Lotus Aromatics, and gives the Javanese variety a run for its money in its own unique way.

    post #4 of 4
    Thread Starter 

    Vetivert absolute, Hermitage Oils

    Produced from wild North Indian vetiver, I was very excited about finally sampling a vetiver absolute, as I had long been hoping for the existence of one. On one hand, I wasn't too surprised with what I experienced but, on the other hand, I was expecting a lot more richness and depth than I actually got.

    The colour is a medium honey brown, with a consistency that's quite similar to labdanum absolute (but a fraction more pourable). Its texture is extremely sticky and, like labdanum absolute, will simply rest on the skin without being fully absorbed.

    Instead of any smokiness, the opening is akin to galbanum absolute - a vinegary-green nuance that slowly dissipates over time. An earthiness soon emerges and any sweetness is kept to a bare minimum. A nuttiness is also perceptible but resides largely in the background. It's never too dirty, smoky or creamy - for most of its duration, it's actually a fresh woodiness with a galbanum-esque facet.

    It's completely devoid of the malty smokiness of the Indian vetiver oil from Eden's Botanicals, and is also a more interesting specimen than the Wild Indian vetiver oil from White Lotus Aromatics. However, while its longevity is very good, it stays far too close to the skin.

    Although it's quite expensive, vetiver oil aficionados should own at least a small bottle of it for reference purposes.

    class="

    7/6/12 at 6:49am

    Trebor said:



    This is the place where you can discuss everything about Indian vetiver impressions, best sources and suppliers, general tips, etc.

    7/18/12 at 6:54am

    Trebor said:



    Wild Indian Vetiver CO2 essential oil, White Lotus Aromatics

    A dark yellowish-brown liquid that’s thick like molasses. It’s considerably nutty but there’s nothing else particularly distinctive about it. It’s also very difficult to detect beyond the first few minutes after application (although it does seem to last for quite a while). Almost lifeless on the skin for the entirety of its duration, it just wallows in a mire of dullness. Very disappointing.

    5/18/13 at 6:34am

    Trebor said:



    Indian Vetiver essential oil, Eden Botanicals

    It's initially very similar to the Indonesian variety but less harsh and fuller-bodied. With a smoky yeast aroma, a prominent burnt malt aspect intensifies its overall charred denseness. But unlike Javanese vetiver oil, this stage is almost relentless and takes much longer to reveal other nuances.

    As the charred denseness slowly subsides, its smokiness resembles castoreum absolute but grittier. And when its intensity finally calms down, a subtle creamy sweetness emerges. Those Marmite tones still remain but, by this stage, it smells more harmonious and alluring.

    Overall, it's a lot better than the one from White Lotus Aromatics, and gives the Javanese variety a run for its money in its own unique way.

    9/13/13 at 8:26am

    Trebor said:



    Vetivert absolute, Hermitage Oils

    Produced from wild North Indian vetiver, I was very excited about finally sampling a vetiver absolute, as I had long been hoping for the existence of one. On one hand, I wasn't too surprised with what I experienced but, on the other hand, I was expecting a lot more richness and depth than I actually got.

    The colour is a medium honey brown, with a consistency that's quite similar to labdanum absolute (but a fraction more pourable). Its texture is extremely sticky and, like labdanum absolute, will simply rest on the skin without being fully absorbed.

    Instead of any smokiness, the opening is akin to galbanum absolute - a vinegary-green nuance that slowly dissipates over time. An earthiness soon emerges and any sweetness is kept to a bare minimum. A nuttiness is also perceptible but resides largely in the background. It's never too dirty, smoky or creamy - for most of its duration, it's actually a fresh woodiness with a galbanum-esque facet.

    It's completely devoid of the malty smokiness of the Indian vetiver oil from Eden's Botanicals, and is also a more interesting specimen than the Wild Indian vetiver oil from White Lotus Aromatics. However, while its longevity is very good, it stays far too close to the skin.

    Although it's quite expensive, vetiver oil aficionados should own at least a small bottle of it for reference purposes.





Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000