Comet Cleanser scent notes - help please

    Comet Cleanser scent notes - help please

    post #1 of 24
    Thread Starter 

    Hi all, newb here.   I am trying to figure out the notes for Comet Cleanser (Original Scent).  I detect Pine (but its not Pine Sol-like) but cant quite figure it out.  I am guessing the Bleach in it adds to its mellowing (also many of the Classic Powdered Laundry Det's smelled good like this til 2008 when they all when cheesy-synthy).     

     

    If any one has any Comet and can guess , please assist .

     

    dankk2.gif

     

    bz

    post #2 of 24

    Whenever I smelled Comet, bleach was the first thing my nose picked up which seemed to overpower everything else.

    post #3 of 24

    picking out ingedients in a cleaning product? this site is not about that..

    post #4 of 24

    I think it's someone who thinks they are being clever/taking the piss but it's pretty lame really

    post #5 of 24

    The thing is, a Perfumer did create the fragrance that goes into that product, and it is an incredibly difficult thing to do.   There are very few ( maybe twenty) Raw Materials that are stable in bleach, and yet a fragrance has to be created that works, and gives the right message; that identifies the particular product and sets it apart from all other similar products, and all for a cost that is a fraction of the cost of a fine fragrance.

     

    So, taking the piss or not, don't discount Household Perfumery; it makes more money for the Perfume Houses than anything else. 

    post #6 of 24
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by David Ruskin View Post
    So, taking the piss or not, don't discount Household Perfumery; it makes more money for the Perfume Houses than anything else. 

    Plus, the chemicals used in household cleaning products are largely the same as those used in mass-marketed perfumery. That's one of the things that came up at a recent lecture I attended on synthetics. 

    post #7 of 24
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by David Ruskin View Post

    The thing is, a Perfumer did create the fragrance that goes into that product, and it is an incredibly difficult thing to do.   There are very few ( maybe twenty) Raw Materials that are stable in bleach, and yet a fragrance has to be created that works, and gives the right message; that identifies the particular product and sets it apart from all other similar products, and all for a cost that is a fraction of the cost of a fine fragrance.

     

    So, taking the piss or not, don't discount Household Perfumery; it makes more money for the Perfume Houses than anything else. 

    VERY Interesting I had not thought of that at all - and that's a great answer to the question either way, if he was serious or not

    post #8 of 24
    Thread Starter 

    No i was being straightforward.  I apol if this is not the best site - perhaps someone can tell me a better one.  

     

    I am interested un backward engineering many fragrances (for personal blends), because of several reasons.  1-i feel that many modern scents smell the same, like bugspray or just too strong and too elaborate.  2-i recently found some colognes in a families (deceased) house i had to clean out that were from the 1960s-70s (mostly Chypres/Oriental Florals) and liked them, but many are no longer made.  One was called Apollo by Revlon or some other 'makeup' company like Loreal, etc (a relative tossed it when before came back to grab it).   Its not the same Apollo made now by another comp.  It was a Chypre, that dried down with a nice soft musk--AWESOME, the date on it was 1975.   3- i recently smelled an Oil blend at a Theater that reminded me of COMET or AJAX , plus Dirt, and patchouli.  I can do the Dirt and Patchouli notes, but need to figure out the Comet notes.

     

    Others i am looking to do are:

     

    -OdoBan cleaner

    -Nippon Kodo Aloeswood Incense (which also has Vetiver, Patchouli..)

    -Chandrika sandal soap

     

    Why soaps?   Something there seems to GLUE and TAME the notes in a natural way (i am guessing the Alkaline in them like Bleach, Borax or Lye).

     

    I didnt mean to insult , i just figured i needed professional advice as i know little on deciphering the notes.

     

    bz


    Edited by billzoe - 5/20/13 at 3:31pm
    post #9 of 24
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by David Ruskin View Post

      "There are very few ( maybe twenty) Raw Materials that are stable in bleach, and yet a fragrance has to be created that works, and gives the right message; that identifies the particular product and sets it apart from all other similar products, and all for a cost that is a fraction of the cost of a fine fragrance."

     

    Thanks David....    This could help narrow it to 20 as you said.   Some i am wondering about are:

     

    -Pine (but what type)

    -Artemesia ?

    -Galbanum

    -Other notes used to temper the pine and add a "Clean" scent (its not a straight pine like Pine Sol, which is simple).

     

     

    Are any of the 1st 3 above stable with Bleach ?

     

    I guess someone would have to smell the Comet.  It can irritate the nose so a nylon fabric or thin fabric can help keep the powdered bits from being inhaled.dankk2.gif

     

    post #10 of 24

    You are looking to make fragrances based on the smell of household cleaners? I am understanding correctly. 

     

    I think you should look for some frags that are similar to the old ones you found. There are plenty still made like that. I dont see your home brew of L'Ajax pour Homme working out very well.

    post #11 of 24
    Thread Starter 

    2 are cleaners, 1 is an Ayravedic Soap and the other a Zen Incense.  Its not that im obsessed with Cleaners, just that 2 happen to be them and the only examples i have found.  To me it doesnt matter if it is a cleaner, a cologne, a tree, incense or what - i am looking to id the notes .   L'Ajax pour Homme has ALREADY been made, i smelled it at the Theater, unfortunately i wasnt able to find who was wearing it - it was definately an Oil as it followed a certian group of people and was way stronger than the smell would be if was the actual cleaner, as well as it had intentional notes of "Dirt" and Patchouli in it.

     

    Aramis is the closest ive found to the 1970s Apollo, but is too Citrus-y and doesnt have the nice background musk that didnt expose itself til about 3 hours into the tail (yes i have tried to add a musk but i dont the right one, and mine smelled 'wrong'). 


    Edited by billzoe - 5/20/13 at 3:45pm
    post #12 of 24
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by billzoe View Post

    No i was being straightforward.  I apol if this is not the best site - perhaps someone can tell me a better one.  

     

    I am interested un backward engineering many fragrances (for personal blends), because of several reasons.  1-i feel that many modern scents smell the same, like bugspray or just too strong and too elaborate.  2-i recently found some colognes in a families (deceased) house i had to clean out that were from the 1960s-70s (mostly Chypres/Oriental Florals) and liked them, but many are no longer made.  One was called Apollo by Revlon or some other 'makeup' company like Loreal, etc (a relative tossed it when before came back to grab it).   Its not the same Apollo made now by another comp.  It was a Chypre, that dried down with a nice soft musk--AWESOME, the date on it was 1975.   3- i recently smelled an Oil blend at a Theater that reminded me of COMET or AJAX , plus Dirt, and patchouli.  I can do the Dirt and Patchouli notes, but need to figure out the Comet notes.

     

    Others i am looking to do are:

     

    -OdoBan cleaner

    -Nippon Kodo Aloeswood Incense (which also has Vetiver, Patchouli..)

    -Chandrika sandal soap

     

    Why soaps?   Something there seems to GLUE and TAME the notes in a natural way (i am guessing the Alkaline in them like Bleach, Borax or Lye).

     

    I didnt mean to insult , i just figured i needed professional advice as i know little on deciphering the notes.

     

    bz

    No Problem it was just the first one I read this morning and was like WHAT?? - I'm sorry that I thought you were joking

    post #13 of 24

    Pine oil is used in Bleach, the other two oils are not.   Trouble with Essential Oils is that almost inevitably some of the chemicals will not be stable, whilst others will be.   Very few oils are used in such an aggressive  medium as bleach.   Patchouli is stable.   The lovely musky dry down you are detecting in the 70s fragrances you have found is probably a mixture of polycyclic musk (I would guess Galaxolide) and Nitromusk (probably Musk Ketone).   Nitromusks are rarely used nowadays, I'm afraid.

    post #14 of 24
    Thread Starter 

    Thanks David !    Very helpful !

     

     

     

       Is there a musk avail now that is similar ?      The strange and interesting thing with it was how it wasnt noticeable til at least 4 hours later-it would seem to "bloom" out of it on the dry down.

    post #15 of 24

    If the fragrances you smelled were from the early 70s, the musk you can smell is probably Musk Ambrette, which was banned in the mid to late 70s.   I'm afraid that there is nothing to replace it, although you could try Cosmone, if you can get it.   On its own it smells very much like a nitromusk, but in use I have found it rather disappointing. 

    post #16 of 24
    Thread Starter 

    Thanks !   You dont happen to know the common denominator in Paul Sebastion, Pierre Cardin and Amaris on the opening notes do you?   To me they all have the same great opening (like the 1970s Apollo) before they go theyre own ways.   I am guessing Clove, Patchouli, Vetiver, but i dont know....   I love the essence of all these but not particularly the dry downs (too much citrus=Aramis, too much Tobacco=PS, etc..).

     

     

     

     

    Ironically while looking at the 70s musks i found this (wiki) :

     

     

    Galaxolide - a polycyclic musk commonly found in laundry detergents to mask the smell of the detergent chemicals.

     

    This may be in some of the Cleaners (?) that smell good.  Note many of the modern Cleaners have lost the "good" smell and smell "cheap" .(all the'Mountain, Rain, Berry' flavors - YUK!)

    post #17 of 24

    5/20/13 at 4:28am

    hednic said:



    Whenever I smelled Comet, bleach was the first thing my nose picked up which seemed to overpower everything else.

    5/20/13 at 4:43am

    Tony T said:



    picking out ingedients in a cleaning product? this site is not about that..

    5/20/13 at 5:33am

    Katana said:



    I think it's someone who thinks they are being clever/taking the piss but it's pretty lame really

    5/20/13 at 9:36am

    David Ruskin said:



    The thing is, a Perfumer did create the fragrance that goes into that product, and it is an incredibly difficult thing to do.   There are very few ( maybe twenty) Raw Materials that are stable in bleach, and yet a fragrance has to be created that works, and gives the right message; that identifies the particular product and sets it apart from all other similar products, and all for a cost that is a fraction of the cost of a fine fragrance.

     

    So, taking the piss or not, don't discount Household Perfumery; it makes more money for the Perfume Houses than anything else. 

    5/20/13 at 10:01am

    deadidol said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by David Ruskin View Post
    So, taking the piss or not, don't discount Household Perfumery; it makes more money for the Perfume Houses than anything else. 

    Plus, the chemicals used in household cleaning products are largely the same as those used in mass-marketed perfumery. That's one of the things that came up at a recent lecture I attended on synthetics. 

    5/20/13 at 12:54pm

    Katana said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by David Ruskin View Post

    The thing is, a Perfumer did create the fragrance that goes into that product, and it is an incredibly difficult thing to do.   There are very few ( maybe twenty) Raw Materials that are stable in bleach, and yet a fragrance has to be created that works, and gives the right message; that identifies the particular product and sets it apart from all other similar products, and all for a cost that is a fraction of the cost of a fine fragrance.

     

    So, taking the piss or not, don't discount Household Perfumery; it makes more money for the Perfume Houses than anything else. 

    VERY Interesting I had not thought of that at all - and that's a great answer to the question either way, if he was serious or not

    5/20/13 at 3:08pm

    billzoe said:



    No i was being straightforward.  I apol if this is not the best site - perhaps someone can tell me a better one.  

     

    I am interested un backward engineering many fragrances (for personal blends), because of several reasons.  1-i feel that many modern scents smell the same, like bugspray or just too strong and too elaborate.  2-i recently found some colognes in a families (deceased) house i had to clean out that were from the 1960s-70s (mostly Chypres/Oriental Florals) and liked them, but many are no longer made.  One was called Apollo by Revlon or some other 'makeup' company like Loreal, etc (a relative tossed it when before came back to grab it).   Its not the same Apollo made now by another comp.  It was a Chypre, that dried down with a nice soft musk--AWESOME, the date on it was 1975.   3- i recently smelled an Oil blend at a Theater that reminded me of COMET or AJAX , plus Dirt, and patchouli.  I can do the Dirt and Patchouli notes, but need to figure out the Comet notes.

     

    Others i am looking to do are:

     

    -OdoBan cleaner

    -Nippon Kodo Aloeswood Incense (which also has Vetiver, Patchouli..)

    -Chandrika sandal soap

     

    Why soaps?   Something there seems to GLUE and TAME the notes in a natural way (i am guessing the Alkaline in them like Bleach, Borax or Lye).

     

    I didnt mean to insult , i just figured i needed professional advice as i know little on deciphering the notes.

     

    bz


    Edited by billzoe - 5/20/13 at 3:31pm

    5/20/13 at 3:18pm

    billzoe said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by David Ruskin View Post

      "There are very few ( maybe twenty) Raw Materials that are stable in bleach, and yet a fragrance has to be created that works, and gives the right message; that identifies the particular product and sets it apart from all other similar products, and all for a cost that is a fraction of the cost of a fine fragrance."

     

    Thanks David....    This could help narrow it to 20 as you said.   Some i am wondering about are:

     

    -Pine (but what type)

    -Artemesia ?

    -Galbanum

    -Other notes used to temper the pine and add a "Clean" scent (its not a straight pine like Pine Sol, which is simple).

     

     

    Are any of the 1st 3 above stable with Bleach ?

     

    I guess someone would have to smell the Comet.  It can irritate the nose so a nylon fabric or thin fabric can help keep the powdered bits from being inhaled.dankk2.gif

     

    5/20/13 at 3:28pm

    heperd said:



    You are looking to make fragrances based on the smell of household cleaners? I am understanding correctly. 

     

    I think you should look for some frags that are similar to the old ones you found. There are plenty still made like that. I dont see your home brew of L'Ajax pour Homme working out very well.

    5/20/13 at 3:33pm

    billzoe said:



    2 are cleaners, 1 is an Ayravedic Soap and the other a Zen Incense.  Its not that im obsessed with Cleaners, just that 2 happen to be them and the only examples i have found.  To me it doesnt matter if it is a cleaner, a cologne, a tree, incense or what - i am looking to id the notes .   L'Ajax pour Homme has ALREADY been made, i smelled it at the Theater, unfortunately i wasnt able to find who was wearing it - it was definately an Oil as it followed a certian group of people and was way stronger than the smell would be if was the actual cleaner, as well as it had intentional notes of "Dirt" and Patchouli in it.

     

    Aramis is the closest ive found to the 1970s Apollo, but is too Citrus-y and doesnt have the nice background musk that didnt expose itself til about 3 hours into the tail (yes i have tried to add a musk but i dont the right one, and mine smelled 'wrong'). 


    Edited by billzoe - 5/20/13 at 3:45pm

    5/20/13 at 6:34pm

    Katana said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by billzoe View Post

    No i was being straightforward.  I apol if this is not the best site - perhaps someone can tell me a better one.  

     

    I am interested un backward engineering many fragrances (for personal blends), because of several reasons.  1-i feel that many modern scents smell the same, like bugspray or just too strong and too elaborate.  2-i recently found some colognes in a families (deceased) house i had to clean out that were from the 1960s-70s (mostly Chypres/Oriental Florals) and liked them, but many are no longer made.  One was called Apollo by Revlon or some other 'makeup' company like Loreal, etc (a relative tossed it when before came back to grab it).   Its not the same Apollo made now by another comp.  It was a Chypre, that dried down with a nice soft musk--AWESOME, the date on it was 1975.   3- i recently smelled an Oil blend at a Theater that reminded me of COMET or AJAX , plus Dirt, and patchouli.  I can do the Dirt and Patchouli notes, but need to figure out the Comet notes.

     

    Others i am looking to do are:

     

    -OdoBan cleaner

    -Nippon Kodo Aloeswood Incense (which also has Vetiver, Patchouli..)

    -Chandrika sandal soap

     

    Why soaps?   Something there seems to GLUE and TAME the notes in a natural way (i am guessing the Alkaline in them like Bleach, Borax or Lye).

     

    I didnt mean to insult , i just figured i needed professional advice as i know little on deciphering the notes.

     

    bz

    No Problem it was just the first one I read this morning and was like WHAT?? - I'm sorry that I thought you were joking

    5/21/13 at 12:54am

    David Ruskin said:



    Pine oil is used in Bleach, the other two oils are not.   Trouble with Essential Oils is that almost inevitably some of the chemicals will not be stable, whilst others will be.   Very few oils are used in such an aggressive  medium as bleach.   Patchouli is stable.   The lovely musky dry down you are detecting in the 70s fragrances you have found is probably a mixture of polycyclic musk (I would guess Galaxolide) and Nitromusk (probably Musk Ketone).   Nitromusks are rarely used nowadays, I'm afraid.

    5/21/13 at 10:48am

    billzoe said:



    Thanks David !    Very helpful !

     

     

     

       Is there a musk avail now that is similar ?      The strange and interesting thing with it was how it wasnt noticeable til at least 4 hours later-it would seem to "bloom" out of it on the dry down.

    5/21/13 at 11:27am

    David Ruskin said:



    If the fragrances you smelled were from the early 70s, the musk you can smell is probably Musk Ambrette, which was banned in the mid to late 70s.   I'm afraid that there is nothing to replace it, although you could try Cosmone, if you can get it.   On its own it smells very much like a nitromusk, but in use I have found it rather disappointing. 

    5/21/13 at 11:49am

    billzoe said:



    Thanks !   You dont happen to know the common denominator in Paul Sebastion, Pierre Cardin and Amaris on the opening notes do you?   To me they all have the same great opening (like the 1970s Apollo) before they go theyre own ways.   I am guessing Clove, Patchouli, Vetiver, but i dont know....   I love the essence of all these but not particularly the dry downs (too much citrus=Aramis, too much Tobacco=PS, etc..).

     

     

     

     

    Ironically while looking at the 70s musks i found this (wiki) :

     

     

    Galaxolide - a polycyclic musk commonly found in laundry detergents to mask the smell of the detergent chemicals.

     

    This may be in some of the Cleaners (?) that smell good.  Note many of the modern Cleaners have lost the "good" smell and smell "cheap" .(all the'Mountain, Rain, Berry' flavors - YUK!)