Badger vs. Boar vs. Horsehair Shaving Brushes

    Badger vs. Boar vs. Horsehair Shaving Brushes

    post #1 of 19
    Thread Starter 

    As a neophyte to the shaving soap world - having finally had enough of throwing cash at gelatinous goop for my shaving needs - I'm curious what more experienced shaving brush users prefer from among the natural hair options, and why.  I'm not interested in a synthetic brush at this time.

     

    Thanks in advance for your time.

    post #2 of 19

    I mainly use a badger brush that I got for $10 from Ebay at Hong Kong. It's as good as my $50 Edwin Jagger badger brush. It does a good job with all shave creams, with all shave sticks and with most soap pucks.
     

    But there are some soap pucks where the soap is just a bit harder, and I get frustrated trying to get a thick lather using the soft badger brush (L'Occitan's Cade is one such puck). With those, I use a cheap boar brush which has harder bristles, and I instantly get a good lather. I've noticed some of those soap pucks got lousy reviews at Badger and Blade, when they gave me excellent shaves  - providing I used a Boar brush.

    For me, the other main difference is that with a boar brush, you feel that you are sort of massaging your face, as you can pummell the brush into it  - something you can't really do with a badger brush.

    Given I'm very happy with my $10 brush, I haven't explored the world of the $150+ silver tip badger brushes, and I haven't seen any horse hair ones available here to tempt me.
    Regards,
    Renato

    post #3 of 19
    For me, badger specifically super badger as it is the most supple and luxurious feeling on my skin. Also tends to hold the most water when saturated.
    post #4 of 19
    I use badger hair.
    I had a Crabtree & Evelyn best that read terrible.

    Too floppy.

    Eventually I moved to a Simpson's Chubby in Manchurian, a Simpson's Chubby 3 in dual band & a M&F chubby 2 in the coveted Finest hair.

    They're dense & soft.

    Cut through soap like chainsaws but feel like cotton candy on your face.

    Here they are

    20130311_145832_0_zps8c7a4dcb.jpg
    post #5 of 19
    I use badger for creams and boar for soaps.
    post #6 of 19
    As Renato and Nosebud, I use a boar bristle brush for hard soaps and badger for creams. I find it much easier to whip up a lather with a stiffer brush on a hard soap. I use an Omega 102 which cost about £10. I use a Kent H8 badger with creams, which was £35. Both superb.
    post #7 of 19

    Badger is good, but many synthetics are also good--and don't retain bacteria, to boot.

     

    These are synthetic badger, cruelty-free.   (Women have fake mink sable makeup brushes.)
     

    post #8 of 19
    Thread Starter 

    Sounds like an "upgrade" from the boar hair shaving brush I have isn't mandated at this time, then, as I'm using soaps.

     

    As I indicated in the OP, I'm not interested in synthetics at this time.

    post #9 of 19
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jasman View Post

    Sounds like an "upgrade" from the boar hair shaving brush I have isn't mandated at this time, then, as I'm using soaps.

     

    As I indicated in the OP, I'm not interested in synthetics at this time.

    I forgot to mention that if one uses shave soap sticks - where one wets one's face, applies the stick to the face, and then lathers it up with a brush - then badger brushes tend to do the job a bit more easily and quickly, and it feels better, compared to using a new boar brush. However, when the boar brush softens up a bit with repeated usage, there's not much difference - only problem is, my cheap boar brush was finally getting there in the softness department, and it literally fell apart on me.

    I still highly recommend the cheap $10 badger brushes from Hong Kong - there is no reason to doubt their authenticity, as pretty much all badger hair comes from China. The one's from Franks Shaving in China cost about $20, and have been very higly rated by various users at Badger and Blade.
    Cheers,
    Renato

    post #10 of 19
    I have a boar and three badgers, and the boar hasn't been touched for months and months. Everyone has their own personal taste, but for me, it's no contest. If you were on an extremely tight budget then a $10 boar would do just fine, however.
    post #11 of 19

    Not sure what mine is but it works just fine. It was really cheap so maybe boar? Is that what most cheap ones are made of?

    I was thinking recently that the way I feel about shaving accessories is the way other people feel about fragrances- I have one good set that works for me and have no interest in collecting multiple different brushes or razors. 

    post #12 of 19
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Renato View Post

    I forgot to mention that if one uses shave soap sticks - where one wets one's face, applies the stick to the face, and then lathers it up with a brush - then badger brushes tend to do the job a bit more easily and quickly, and it feels better, compared to using a new boar brush. However, when the boar brush softens up a bit with repeated usage, there's not much difference - only problem is, my cheap boar brush was finally getting there in the softness department, and it literally fell apart on me.

    I still highly recommend the cheap $10 badger brushes from Hong Kong - there is no reason to doubt their authenticity, as pretty much all badger hair comes from China. The one's from Franks Shaving in China cost about $20, and have been very higly rated by various users at Badger and Blade.
    Cheers,
    Renato

    I don't use a shaving stick - as of now I'm still using the Van Der Haagen Deluxe starter kit with the blue/green bowl, 'unscented' soap and boar brush, but I build the lather on my face, rather than in a bowl.

    post #13 of 19
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jpipes3 View Post

    I have a boar and three badgers, and the boar hasn't been touched for months and months. Everyone has their own personal taste, but for me, it's no contest.
    Once I felt the badger, it was bye bye boar!
    post #14 of 19

    With apologies to bump this thread after quite a while and also for possibly getting a bit off-topic: how would the HJM badger brush be rated by BN wet shavers? This one of the few types of natural bristles shaving brush of a more serious, more renowned brand available where I live and I might consider buying one. But before taking the plunge, being very receptive to any BN recommendations, for whom I gratefully thank in advance.  

    post #15 of 19
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ken_Russell View Post

    With apologies to bump this thread after quite a while and also for possibly getting a bit off-topic: how would the HJM badger brush be rated by BN wet shavers? This one of the few types of natural bristles shaving brush of a more serious, more renowned brand available where I live and I might consider buying one. But before taking the plunge, being very receptive to any BN recommendations, for whom I gratefully thank in advance.  

    I've got an HJM synthetic fibre brush. It's OK. It dries very quickly indeed so I use it as a travel brush. It's a bit too floppy and the knot is a bit smaller than I prefer though. If they do a natural bristle one it'll probably be a bit stiffer. All Muhle products tend to be well-made.
    post #16 of 19
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Marais View Post


    I've got an HJM synthetic fibre brush. It's OK. It dries very quickly indeed so I use it as a travel brush. It's a bit too floppy and the knot is a bit smaller than I prefer though. If they do a natural bristle one it'll probably be a bit stiffer. All Muhle products tend to be well-made.

     

    Thanks. 

    post #17 of 19

    My favourite brush is a Semogue Owner's Club boar. I primarily use shave soaps and enjoy the combination of good backbone and soft feel when a boar brush is broken in.

    5/27/13 at 5:18pm

    Jasman said:



    As a neophyte to the shaving soap world - having finally had enough of throwing cash at gelatinous goop for my shaving needs - I'm curious what more experienced shaving brush users prefer from among the natural hair options, and why.  I'm not interested in a synthetic brush at this time.

     

    Thanks in advance for your time.

    5/27/13 at 6:31pm

    Renato said:



    I mainly use a badger brush that I got for $10 from Ebay at Hong Kong. It's as good as my $50 Edwin Jagger badger brush. It does a good job with all shave creams, with all shave sticks and with most soap pucks.
     

    But there are some soap pucks where the soap is just a bit harder, and I get frustrated trying to get a thick lather using the soft badger brush (L'Occitan's Cade is one such puck). With those, I use a cheap boar brush which has harder bristles, and I instantly get a good lather. I've noticed some of those soap pucks got lousy reviews at Badger and Blade, when they gave me excellent shaves  - providing I used a Boar brush.

    For me, the other main difference is that with a boar brush, you feel that you are sort of massaging your face, as you can pummell the brush into it  - something you can't really do with a badger brush.

    Given I'm very happy with my $10 brush, I haven't explored the world of the $150+ silver tip badger brushes, and I haven't seen any horse hair ones available here to tempt me.
    Regards,
    Renato

    5/27/13 at 6:36pm

    hednic said:



    For me, badger specifically super badger as it is the most supple and luxurious feeling on my skin. Also tends to hold the most water when saturated.

    5/29/13 at 2:48am

    hedonist222 said:



    I use badger hair.
    I had a Crabtree & Evelyn best that read terrible.

    Too floppy.

    Eventually I moved to a Simpson's Chubby in Manchurian, a Simpson's Chubby 3 in dual band & a M&F chubby 2 in the coveted Finest hair.

    They're dense & soft.

    Cut through soap like chainsaws but feel like cotton candy on your face.

    Here they are

    20130311_145832_0_zps8c7a4dcb.jpg

    5/29/13 at 3:15am

    Nosebud said:



    I use badger for creams and boar for soaps.

    5/29/13 at 3:17am

    Marais said:



    As Renato and Nosebud, I use a boar bristle brush for hard soaps and badger for creams. I find it much easier to whip up a lather with a stiffer brush on a hard soap. I use an Omega 102 which cost about £10. I use a Kent H8 badger with creams, which was £35. Both superb.

    5/29/13 at 1:44pm

    Primrose said:



    Badger is good, but many synthetics are also good--and don't retain bacteria, to boot.

     

    These are synthetic badger, cruelty-free.   (Women have fake mink sable makeup brushes.)
     

    5/30/13 at 4:34am

    Jasman said:



    Sounds like an "upgrade" from the boar hair shaving brush I have isn't mandated at this time, then, as I'm using soaps.

     

    As I indicated in the OP, I'm not interested in synthetics at this time.

    5/31/13 at 7:44pm

    Renato said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jasman View Post

    Sounds like an "upgrade" from the boar hair shaving brush I have isn't mandated at this time, then, as I'm using soaps.

     

    As I indicated in the OP, I'm not interested in synthetics at this time.

    I forgot to mention that if one uses shave soap sticks - where one wets one's face, applies the stick to the face, and then lathers it up with a brush - then badger brushes tend to do the job a bit more easily and quickly, and it feels better, compared to using a new boar brush. However, when the boar brush softens up a bit with repeated usage, there's not much difference - only problem is, my cheap boar brush was finally getting there in the softness department, and it literally fell apart on me.

    I still highly recommend the cheap $10 badger brushes from Hong Kong - there is no reason to doubt their authenticity, as pretty much all badger hair comes from China. The one's from Franks Shaving in China cost about $20, and have been very higly rated by various users at Badger and Blade.
    Cheers,
    Renato

    6/11/13 at 6:45pm

    jpipes3 said:



    I have a boar and three badgers, and the boar hasn't been touched for months and months. Everyone has their own personal taste, but for me, it's no contest. If you were on an extremely tight budget then a $10 boar would do just fine, however.

    6/11/13 at 7:26pm

    heperd said:



    Not sure what mine is but it works just fine. It was really cheap so maybe boar? Is that what most cheap ones are made of?

    I was thinking recently that the way I feel about shaving accessories is the way other people feel about fragrances- I have one good set that works for me and have no interest in collecting multiple different brushes or razors. 

    6/12/13 at 7:59am

    Jasman said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Renato View Post

    I forgot to mention that if one uses shave soap sticks - where one wets one's face, applies the stick to the face, and then lathers it up with a brush - then badger brushes tend to do the job a bit more easily and quickly, and it feels better, compared to using a new boar brush. However, when the boar brush softens up a bit with repeated usage, there's not much difference - only problem is, my cheap boar brush was finally getting there in the softness department, and it literally fell apart on me.

    I still highly recommend the cheap $10 badger brushes from Hong Kong - there is no reason to doubt their authenticity, as pretty much all badger hair comes from China. The one's from Franks Shaving in China cost about $20, and have been very higly rated by various users at Badger and Blade.
    Cheers,
    Renato

    I don't use a shaving stick - as of now I'm still using the Van Der Haagen Deluxe starter kit with the blue/green bowl, 'unscented' soap and boar brush, but I build the lather on my face, rather than in a bowl.

    7/2/13 at 4:15pm

    hednic said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jpipes3 View Post

    I have a boar and three badgers, and the boar hasn't been touched for months and months. Everyone has their own personal taste, but for me, it's no contest.
    Once I felt the badger, it was bye bye boar!

    10/6/13 at 6:38am

    Ken_Russell said:



    With apologies to bump this thread after quite a while and also for possibly getting a bit off-topic: how would the HJM badger brush be rated by BN wet shavers? This one of the few types of natural bristles shaving brush of a more serious, more renowned brand available where I live and I might consider buying one. But before taking the plunge, being very receptive to any BN recommendations, for whom I gratefully thank in advance.  

    10/6/13 at 8:46am

    Marais said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ken_Russell View Post

    With apologies to bump this thread after quite a while and also for possibly getting a bit off-topic: how would the HJM badger brush be rated by BN wet shavers? This one of the few types of natural bristles shaving brush of a more serious, more renowned brand available where I live and I might consider buying one. But before taking the plunge, being very receptive to any BN recommendations, for whom I gratefully thank in advance.  

    I've got an HJM synthetic fibre brush. It's OK. It dries very quickly indeed so I use it as a travel brush. It's a bit too floppy and the knot is a bit smaller than I prefer though. If they do a natural bristle one it'll probably be a bit stiffer. All Muhle products tend to be well-made.

    10/6/13 at 8:47am

    Ken_Russell said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Marais View Post


    I've got an HJM synthetic fibre brush. It's OK. It dries very quickly indeed so I use it as a travel brush. It's a bit too floppy and the knot is a bit smaller than I prefer though. If they do a natural bristle one it'll probably be a bit stiffer. All Muhle products tend to be well-made.

     

    Thanks. 

    10/6/13 at 3:47pm

    Dennard said:



    My favourite brush is a Semogue Owner's Club boar. I primarily use shave soaps and enjoy the combination of good backbone and soft feel when a boar brush is broken in.