Baked Dirt and Wet Leaves..?

    Baked Dirt and Wet Leaves..?

    post #1 of 11
    Thread Starter 

    One of the great things about fragrances is the ability for them to invoke sense memories. I love woody smells probably because they remind me of being in the woods...a place where it's easy to breathe deep and relax. I wear fragrance for myself, to take me to my happy place smiley.gif

    There are a few scents that I can think of that I would love to either use in a fragrance, or find one that includes or suggests them. I call them my "California Smells"...smells that remind me of going fishing as a kid in said state.

    The first is the smell of sun-baked dirt. Hot air, a slight breeze...trees...sand.

    The second has been tough for me to figure out where exactly it comes from, but it's a smell I associate with shady, tree-lined streams. I would literally go down to the water and sniff around trying to figure out where it was coming from. Every time I smelled it there were always two things present: deciduous trees and running water. I determined that it was most likely coming from the wet fallen leaves. I even went so far as to try to figure out what tree's leaves it was, and most times, cottonwood trees were present.

    Does anyone know what I'm talking about? I bet that people that are around it all the time don't even notice the smell, but it is so specific and obvious to me!

    post #2 of 11
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pelicanesqueView Post

    I bet that people that are around it all the time don't even notice the smell, but it is so specific and obvious to me!
    I think you are absolutely right about that.
    post #3 of 11

    You might try Mitti Attar, which is quite literally baked earth distilled into sandalwood. This is a subtle and delicate scent, but one that will probably hit a home-run with you! It's quite beautiful albeit a bit expensive. Christopher always carries it at White Lotus:

    http://www.whitelotusaromatics.com/product/mitti-attar

    post #4 of 11

    I wonder where these streams were where you were wandering around smelling this wonderful fragrance. Was this also in California?

    Years ago, while hopping over river stones at Happy Isles, a favorite spot where lots of rushing water converges that plunges down the many falls into Yosemite Valley at spring thaw, I came across a heavenly smell. Following my nose, I discovered that California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica) was growing abundantly in this setting. Huge bushes of it, well over my head, all very green and happy. You can use these leaves for cooking, etc, but be careful when crushing and smelling these fresh green leaves. The aroma is fantastic, but so ultra-pungent it will really knock you for a loop. Native peoples used this plant to cure headaches, but a blast of this can just as easily knock your sinuses completely out for a number of hours. Could it be this wonderfully fragrant laurel you're smelling, too, at the water's edge?

    Read more at:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umbellularia

    post #5 of 11
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NymphaeaView Post

    You might try Mitti Attar, which is quite literally baked earth distilled into sandalwood. This is a subtle and delicate scent, but one that will probably hit a home-run with you! It's quite beautiful albeit a bit expensive. Christopher always carries it at White Lotus:

    http://www.whitelotusaromatics.com/product/mitti-attar
    Wow! That sounds amazing!! Of course, it has to be nearly unattainable :P
    I will now embark on a mission to somehow smell this wonder-fragrance.
    Thanks!
    post #6 of 11
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mastorerView Post

    I wonder where these streams were where you were wandering around smelling this wonderful fragrance. Was this also in California?

    Years ago, while hopping over river stones at Happy Isles, a favorite spot where lots of rushing water converges that plunges down the many falls into Yosemite Valley at spring thaw, I came across a heavenly smell. Following my nose, I discovered that California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica) was growing abundantly in this setting. Huge bushes of it, well over my head, all very green and happy. You can use these leaves for cooking, etc, but be careful when crushing and smelling these fresh green leaves. The aroma is fantastic, but so ultra-pungent it will really knock you for a loop. Native peoples used this plant to cure headaches, but a blast of this can just as easily knock your sinuses completely out for a number of hours. Could it be this wonderfully fragrant laurel you're smelling, too, at the water's edge?

    Read more at:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umbellularia

    I have smelled this "wet leaf" smell around streams and lakes in California: the bay area/central CA mostly, but elsewhere in the state as well (Eastern Sierras, for instance). I have also smelled it in Zion National Park in Utah, though, so that makes me think that it wouldn't specifically be this laurel. I'd be interested in smelling this laurel! Sounds like it would be a nice addition to the olfactory landscape. We have mountain laurel here in New York that blooms right about now, but hadn't noticed a smell before.

    Oh, Yosemite! If someone were to bottle that up, I would bathe in it! It would be akin to bathing in magic, I would imagine.

    Update: I looked at the range map and saw the the CA bay laurel also grows in Big Sur, another place that smells amazing! Hmmm...

    post #7 of 11

    actually, i do know what you mean but i don't think it is the laurel since i also get that wet stream smell in the Pacific Northwest and in the American MidWest

    I suspect it is more to do with moses, maybe algae in the stream near the edge?

    My favourite though is a combo of your dry baked earth and the wet stream - the smell of the earth in the first 10 minutes of rain

    What in the world is that wonderful smell and has it ever been captured in a scent? Sigh.

    post #8 of 11

    Demeter made a fragrance of earth after the rain. Called 'Dirt'.

    post #9 of 11
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by belz0008View Post

    actually, i do know what you mean but i don't think it is the laurel since i also get that wet stream smell in the Pacific Northwest and in the American MidWest

    I suspect it is more to do with moses, maybe algae in the stream near the edge?

    My favourite though is a combo of your dry baked earth and the wet stream - the smell of the earth in the first 10 minutes of rain

    What in the world is that wonderful smell and has it ever been captured in a scent? Sigh.


    From what I read, I think mitti attar might be pretty close to what you're after! I'm hoping to find a reasonably-priced sample somewhere so that I can actually smell it, instead of just dream about it.

    post #10 of 11
    CB I Hate Perfume makes the most unbelievable scent. BlaBlack Marchck March. I think it's going to change your life. It's like lying in a pile of fallen leaves in moist spring dirt. Like nothing I've ever known to come from a bottle.

    From the CB site:
    "A fresh clean scent composed of Rain Drops, Leaf Buds, Wet Twigs, Tree Sap, Bark, Mossy Earth and the faintest hint of Spring.

    Flower Bulbs as pretty and bright as rain drops on black twigs in March"
    post #11 of 11
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NymphaeaView Post

    You might try Mitti Attar...

    +1

    class="

    6/8/13 at 4:02pm

    pelicanesque said:



    One of the great things about fragrances is the ability for them to invoke sense memories. I love woody smells probably because they remind me of being in the woods...a place where it's easy to breathe deep and relax. I wear fragrance for myself, to take me to my happy place smiley.gif

    There are a few scents that I can think of that I would love to either use in a fragrance, or find one that includes or suggests them. I call them my "California Smells"...smells that remind me of going fishing as a kid in said state.

    The first is the smell of sun-baked dirt. Hot air, a slight breeze...trees...sand.

    The second has been tough for me to figure out where exactly it comes from, but it's a smell I associate with shady, tree-lined streams. I would literally go down to the water and sniff around trying to figure out where it was coming from. Every time I smelled it there were always two things present: deciduous trees and running water. I determined that it was most likely coming from the wet fallen leaves. I even went so far as to try to figure out what tree's leaves it was, and most times, cottonwood trees were present.

    Does anyone know what I'm talking about? I bet that people that are around it all the time don't even notice the smell, but it is so specific and obvious to me!

    6/8/13 at 10:15pm

    hednic said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pelicanesqueView Post

    I bet that people that are around it all the time don't even notice the smell, but it is so specific and obvious to me!
    I think you are absolutely right about that.

    6/27/13 at 11:39am

    Nymphaea said:



    You might try Mitti Attar, which is quite literally baked earth distilled into sandalwood. This is a subtle and delicate scent, but one that will probably hit a home-run with you! It's quite beautiful albeit a bit expensive. Christopher always carries it at White Lotus:

    http://www.whitelotusaromatics.com/product/mitti-attar

    6/27/13 at 3:05pm

    mastorer said:



    I wonder where these streams were where you were wandering around smelling this wonderful fragrance. Was this also in California?

    Years ago, while hopping over river stones at Happy Isles, a favorite spot where lots of rushing water converges that plunges down the many falls into Yosemite Valley at spring thaw, I came across a heavenly smell. Following my nose, I discovered that California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica) was growing abundantly in this setting. Huge bushes of it, well over my head, all very green and happy. You can use these leaves for cooking, etc, but be careful when crushing and smelling these fresh green leaves. The aroma is fantastic, but so ultra-pungent it will really knock you for a loop. Native peoples used this plant to cure headaches, but a blast of this can just as easily knock your sinuses completely out for a number of hours. Could it be this wonderfully fragrant laurel you're smelling, too, at the water's edge?

    Read more at:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umbellularia

    6/28/13 at 5:40am

    pelicanesque said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NymphaeaView Post

    You might try Mitti Attar, which is quite literally baked earth distilled into sandalwood. This is a subtle and delicate scent, but one that will probably hit a home-run with you! It's quite beautiful albeit a bit expensive. Christopher always carries it at White Lotus:

    http://www.whitelotusaromatics.com/product/mitti-attar
    Wow! That sounds amazing!! Of course, it has to be nearly unattainable :P
    I will now embark on a mission to somehow smell this wonder-fragrance.
    Thanks!

    6/28/13 at 8:04am

    pelicanesque said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mastorerView Post

    I wonder where these streams were where you were wandering around smelling this wonderful fragrance. Was this also in California?

    Years ago, while hopping over river stones at Happy Isles, a favorite spot where lots of rushing water converges that plunges down the many falls into Yosemite Valley at spring thaw, I came across a heavenly smell. Following my nose, I discovered that California bay laurel (Umbellularia californica) was growing abundantly in this setting. Huge bushes of it, well over my head, all very green and happy. You can use these leaves for cooking, etc, but be careful when crushing and smelling these fresh green leaves. The aroma is fantastic, but so ultra-pungent it will really knock you for a loop. Native peoples used this plant to cure headaches, but a blast of this can just as easily knock your sinuses completely out for a number of hours. Could it be this wonderfully fragrant laurel you're smelling, too, at the water's edge?

    Read more at:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umbellularia

    I have smelled this "wet leaf" smell around streams and lakes in California: the bay area/central CA mostly, but elsewhere in the state as well (Eastern Sierras, for instance). I have also smelled it in Zion National Park in Utah, though, so that makes me think that it wouldn't specifically be this laurel. I'd be interested in smelling this laurel! Sounds like it would be a nice addition to the olfactory landscape. We have mountain laurel here in New York that blooms right about now, but hadn't noticed a smell before.

    Oh, Yosemite! If someone were to bottle that up, I would bathe in it! It would be akin to bathing in magic, I would imagine.

    Update: I looked at the range map and saw the the CA bay laurel also grows in Big Sur, another place that smells amazing! Hmmm...

    7/8/13 at 9:41pm

    belz0008 said:



    actually, i do know what you mean but i don't think it is the laurel since i also get that wet stream smell in the Pacific Northwest and in the American MidWest

    I suspect it is more to do with moses, maybe algae in the stream near the edge?

    My favourite though is a combo of your dry baked earth and the wet stream - the smell of the earth in the first 10 minutes of rain

    What in the world is that wonderful smell and has it ever been captured in a scent? Sigh.

    7/10/13 at 12:29am

    mumsy said:



    Demeter made a fragrance of earth after the rain. Called 'Dirt'.

    7/15/13 at 9:18pm

    pelicanesque said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by belz0008View Post

    actually, i do know what you mean but i don't think it is the laurel since i also get that wet stream smell in the Pacific Northwest and in the American MidWest

    I suspect it is more to do with moses, maybe algae in the stream near the edge?

    My favourite though is a combo of your dry baked earth and the wet stream - the smell of the earth in the first 10 minutes of rain

    What in the world is that wonderful smell and has it ever been captured in a scent? Sigh.


    From what I read, I think mitti attar might be pretty close to what you're after! I'm hoping to find a reasonably-priced sample somewhere so that I can actually smell it, instead of just dream about it.

    10/8/13 at 2:42am

    Fancypancy said:



    CB I Hate Perfume makes the most unbelievable scent. BlaBlack Marchck March. I think it's going to change your life. It's like lying in a pile of fallen leaves in moist spring dirt. Like nothing I've ever known to come from a bottle.

    From the CB site:
    "A fresh clean scent composed of Rain Drops, Leaf Buds, Wet Twigs, Tree Sap, Bark, Mossy Earth and the faintest hint of Spring.

    Flower Bulbs as pretty and bright as rain drops on black twigs in March"

    10/13/13 at 1:23pm

    purplebird7 said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NymphaeaView Post

    You might try Mitti Attar...

    +1





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