A response to the thread "Which do you prefer, projection or sillage?"

    A response to the thread "Which do you prefer, projection or sillage?"

    post #1 of 4
    Thread Starter 
    The only difference I see in this distinction is whether you're standing still or moving. If you're moving, the passage of air over the scented area is leaving a trail, and if you're still, it's evaporation without air friction.

    If you're standing still, it's often a function of body temperature: if your body temperature is a little higher, you project a little more.

    The distinction that is more telling to me is the one between sillage (or projection, if you must distinguish them) and longevity. Some scents evaporate over a longer period of time because of factors such as fixation and strength. Fixation has to do with heavier molecules (usually base notes) helping "hold on" to other, more volatile notes in the mix, thus slowing the overall evaporation of the scent by keeping it on the skin longer. Strength has to do with percentage of odorant material in the scent, i. e., EdC concentration vs. EdT, EdP, and pure perfume concentrations. The greater the concentration of odorant material (as a percentage of the total solution), the more projection is potentially available. Even with a higher proportion of essential oils, absolutes, and concretes, the amount of fixatives is crucial.

    On this last point, for example, in different formulations, the proportion of top to middle to base notes is different.

    In eaux de toilette, typically, 50% of the odorant material is top notes, 30% middle notes, and only 20% base notes. Fixation is weak, because most fixative materials are in the base, and he base is the lowest proportion of the three stages of the pyramid.

    Look at these comparisons of typical proportions and strengths:

    • Eaux de toilette: 50% top notes; 30% middle notes; and 20% base notes; 8-15% total odorant materials.
    • Eaux de parfum: 40% top notes; 30% middle notes; and 30% base notes; 15-20% total odorant materials.
    • Pure perfume (extrait): 20% top notes; 30% middle notes; and 50% base notes; 20-25% or more total odorant materials.

    So you see that between EdT and extrait, the proportions of top to base notes are reversed, and that's why perfumes project more than EdTs. A 50% base note formulation is heavier in resinoids and fixatives, holding the scent longer and improving longevity. Perfumes are also more expensive because of this. While there are many exceptions to this, in general, most base note materials are more expensive than most top notes and heart notes (although some of these can be quite expensive, too at least the superior sources of jasmine, rose, and so on.)

    Also, the overall odorant materials content (higher proportions between scented materials and diluting material, such as alcohol and water) improves both longevity and projection.

    One more thing: Projection is also a function of the presence of animal
    materials in perfume. Something about animal materials causes a greater level of diffusion of the whole mix of scent materials. Now that many animal materials have been replaced by synthetics, even many perfume-strength scents no longer pack the wallop they once did. Natural animal materials that are easier to obtain and less intrusive to the animals to produce are still in limited use, however: beeswax, castoreum, ambergris, and natural civet are still available, though very expensive to produce, and consequently much less in demand. Genuine musk is almost impossible to obtain, because the musk deer is really an endangered species. Some plant materials, such as orris butter, are also not only fixative in nature, but paradoxically, also aid in diffusion.

    I hope this has been informative, and I apologize for the length of it.
    post #2 of 4
    Wow! Great entry! I just learned a hell of a lot. Any knowledge is greatly appreciated to a newbie like me! I'm definitely gonna go check out some of your other posts. Thanks!
    post #3 of 4
    Thread Starter 

    Skin scents

    SculptureOfSoul rightly responded in the original thread that some people observe that sillage can be less with EdPs and pure perfumes because more base notes fix more of the most volatile components, increasing longevity, but lowering projection.

    This can be true, of course, and often is. The use of fixatives is a trade-off for projection, in a way. There are other factors, however, that can mitigate this effect. One is that there's more perfume material in these formulations, percentage-wise, and that ups the potential for more scenting power. To exploit that potential requires some additional factors, however.

    One factor in this is that some materials have a lower scent detection threshold than others. That is, a much smaller amount of these is much more detectable than larger amounts of other materials. Beta-damascenone in rose oil is one such. It's only less than one percent of the total scent material in rose oil, but it provides about ninety percent of the total rose impression because it's detectable to the nose at lower thresholds than the other components in rose oil. Higher quality oils used in higher density EdPs and pure perfumes can sometimes function more effectively than the stuff that gets put into cheaper juice.

    The other advantage of the bigger budgets that EdPs and perfumes enjoy is that they can make use of costlier animal-derived materials that really boost projection. Where this is done, you get the multiple advantages of more odorants, more fixation, and more diffusion all at once.

    I hope that helps put all these factors into better perspective.
    post #4 of 4
    Started of with a crystal clear explanation, and went on higher to an absolute master class! bravo!
    class="

    9/11/10 at 3:16am

    JaimeB said:



    The only difference I see in this distinction is whether you're standing still or moving. If you're moving, the passage of air over the scented area is leaving a trail, and if you're still, it's evaporation without air friction.

    If you're standing still, it's often a function of body temperature: if your body temperature is a little higher, you project a little more.

    The distinction that is more telling to me is the one between sillage (or projection, if you must distinguish them) and longevity. Some scents evaporate over a longer period of time because of factors such as fixation and strength. Fixation has to do with heavier molecules (usually base notes) helping "hold on" to other, more volatile notes in the mix, thus slowing the overall evaporation of the scent by keeping it on the skin longer. Strength has to do with percentage of odorant material in the scent, i. e., EdC concentration vs. EdT, EdP, and pure perfume concentrations. The greater the concentration of odorant material (as a percentage of the total solution), the more projection is potentially available. Even with a higher proportion of essential oils, absolutes, and concretes, the amount of fixatives is crucial.

    On this last point, for example, in different formulations, the proportion of top to middle to base notes is different.

    In eaux de toilette, typically, 50% of the odorant material is top notes, 30% middle notes, and only 20% base notes. Fixation is weak, because most fixative materials are in the base, and he base is the lowest proportion of the three stages of the pyramid.

    Look at these comparisons of typical proportions and strengths:

    • Eaux de toilette: 50% top notes; 30% middle notes; and 20% base notes; 8-15% total odorant materials.
    • Eaux de parfum: 40% top notes; 30% middle notes; and 30% base notes; 15-20% total odorant materials.
    • Pure perfume (extrait): 20% top notes; 30% middle notes; and 50% base notes; 20-25% or more total odorant materials.

    So you see that between EdT and extrait, the proportions of top to base notes are reversed, and that's why perfumes project more than EdTs. A 50% base note formulation is heavier in resinoids and fixatives, holding the scent longer and improving longevity. Perfumes are also more expensive because of this. While there are many exceptions to this, in general, most base note materials are more expensive than most top notes and heart notes (although some of these can be quite expensive, too at least the superior sources of jasmine, rose, and so on.)

    Also, the overall odorant materials content (higher proportions between scented materials and diluting material, such as alcohol and water) improves both longevity and projection.

    One more thing: Projection is also a function of the presence of animal
    materials in perfume. Something about animal materials causes a greater level of diffusion of the whole mix of scent materials. Now that many animal materials have been replaced by synthetics, even many perfume-strength scents no longer pack the wallop they once did. Natural animal materials that are easier to obtain and less intrusive to the animals to produce are still in limited use, however: beeswax, castoreum, ambergris, and natural civet are still available, though very expensive to produce, and consequently much less in demand. Genuine musk is almost impossible to obtain, because the musk deer is really an endangered species. Some plant materials, such as orris butter, are also not only fixative in nature, but paradoxically, also aid in diffusion.

    I hope this has been informative, and I apologize for the length of it.

    9/11/10 at 8:53pm

    CanwllCorfe said:



    Wow! Great entry! I just learned a hell of a lot. Any knowledge is greatly appreciated to a newbie like me! I'm definitely gonna go check out some of your other posts. Thanks!

    9/12/10 at 4:18pm

    JaimeB said:



    Skin scents

    SculptureOfSoul rightly responded in the original thread that some people observe that sillage can be less with EdPs and pure perfumes because more base notes fix more of the most volatile components, increasing longevity, but lowering projection.

    This can be true, of course, and often is. The use of fixatives is a trade-off for projection, in a way. There are other factors, however, that can mitigate this effect. One is that there's more perfume material in these formulations, percentage-wise, and that ups the potential for more scenting power. To exploit that potential requires some additional factors, however.

    One factor in this is that some materials have a lower scent detection threshold than others. That is, a much smaller amount of these is much more detectable than larger amounts of other materials. Beta-damascenone in rose oil is one such. It's only less than one percent of the total scent material in rose oil, but it provides about ninety percent of the total rose impression because it's detectable to the nose at lower thresholds than the other components in rose oil. Higher quality oils used in higher density EdPs and pure perfumes can sometimes function more effectively than the stuff that gets put into cheaper juice.

    The other advantage of the bigger budgets that EdPs and perfumes enjoy is that they can make use of costlier animal-derived materials that really boost projection. Where this is done, you get the multiple advantages of more odorants, more fixation, and more diffusion all at once.

    I hope that helps put all these factors into better perspective.

    5/17/11 at 2:07pm

    sanuly said:



    Started of with a crystal clear explanation, and went on higher to an absolute master class! bravo!





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