A Post in the Thread "When and how did your real fragrance journey begin?"

    A Post in the Thread "When and how did your real fragrance journey begin?"

    post #1 of 2
    Thread Starter 
    Very interesting questions, ctran019! Thanks for asking.

    I grew up in a household where people sometimes wore scent, so I could say that I was interested/curious about it from an early age. My real interest began sometime around age 30, and it took off pretty quickly after that. I'm not sure exactly what sparked it; maybe it was that I started finding more people who wore scent. At least, that's what I think it was.

    Once I became interested, I began to read about it and try to identify some of the more exotic ingredients, especially things with historical interest, like incense, or things that were very exotic or rare, or unexpected (like some of the animal materials, such as ambergris or musk).

    I'm the kind of person who, once my curiosity about a subject is piqued, becomes insatiable for more and more knowledge about it. I think that may be because of my academic training in research, or maybe just a sign of a kind of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Anyway, I think without the academic factor, I wouldn't have gotten as deep into it as I have.

    Another side of it is that fragrance is such a sensory/sensual experience. I have a strong interest in flavors and cooking as well, which is of course, part of the same appeal of the sense of smell. A lot of physiologists feel that the sense of smell is the most primitive (meaning the earliest) of all the senses (with the exception of the sense of touch), and smell perception and interpretation is very deeply located in the most primitive part of the human brain.

    Then, there is the whole aspect of aesthetics, the art of fragrance design and the canons of judgment and taste regarding scents. A long and rich history of the art of perfumery is another aspect of scent that opens up a whole new area of research and goes far beyond the mere materials and chemistry of it into the social and creative side of its role in human life.

    Beyond that, the commercial side of perfume, its marketing, economics, production, and distribution, has implications for questions of conspicuous consumption of luxury goods, consumerism, government regulation (the whole IFRA question), raw materials sourcing, and the concentration of scent manufacturing in a handful of multinationals.

    So you see, my friends, that it is an area of interest that has potential for being inexhaustible, constantly evolving, growing, changing... There's a lot to get into besides just deciding what to buy or what to wear. That's only the tip of the iceberg... and of course, the most fun!
    post #2 of 2
    Jim,
    Its nice to read about how your journey started and to recap some of our conversation.
    My fragrance journey also began at a young age - being surrounded by family and friends. Upon joining basenotes in 2006, your writing and reviews played a role in moving me along my journey. While the beauty of fragrance is experienced through the sense of smell, it can also be expressed through language. Merci encore.
    J'espere que vous etes bien! Au revoir,

    Laroche
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    2/15/11 at 8:29am

    JaimeB said:



    Very interesting questions, ctran019! Thanks for asking.

    I grew up in a household where people sometimes wore scent, so I could say that I was interested/curious about it from an early age. My real interest began sometime around age 30, and it took off pretty quickly after that. I'm not sure exactly what sparked it; maybe it was that I started finding more people who wore scent. At least, that's what I think it was.

    Once I became interested, I began to read about it and try to identify some of the more exotic ingredients, especially things with historical interest, like incense, or things that were very exotic or rare, or unexpected (like some of the animal materials, such as ambergris or musk).

    I'm the kind of person who, once my curiosity about a subject is piqued, becomes insatiable for more and more knowledge about it. I think that may be because of my academic training in research, or maybe just a sign of a kind of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Anyway, I think without the academic factor, I wouldn't have gotten as deep into it as I have.

    Another side of it is that fragrance is such a sensory/sensual experience. I have a strong interest in flavors and cooking as well, which is of course, part of the same appeal of the sense of smell. A lot of physiologists feel that the sense of smell is the most primitive (meaning the earliest) of all the senses (with the exception of the sense of touch), and smell perception and interpretation is very deeply located in the most primitive part of the human brain.

    Then, there is the whole aspect of aesthetics, the art of fragrance design and the canons of judgment and taste regarding scents. A long and rich history of the art of perfumery is another aspect of scent that opens up a whole new area of research and goes far beyond the mere materials and chemistry of it into the social and creative side of its role in human life.

    Beyond that, the commercial side of perfume, its marketing, economics, production, and distribution, has implications for questions of conspicuous consumption of luxury goods, consumerism, government regulation (the whole IFRA question), raw materials sourcing, and the concentration of scent manufacturing in a handful of multinationals.

    So you see, my friends, that it is an area of interest that has potential for being inexhaustible, constantly evolving, growing, changing... There's a lot to get into besides just deciding what to buy or what to wear. That's only the tip of the iceberg... and of course, the most fun!

    2/15/11 at 10:49am

    laroche said:



    Jim,
    Its nice to read about how your journey started and to recap some of our conversation.
    My fragrance journey also began at a young age - being surrounded by family and friends. Upon joining basenotes in 2006, your writing and reviews played a role in moving me along my journey. While the beauty of fragrance is experienced through the sense of smell, it can also be expressed through language. Merci encore.
    J'espere que vous etes bien! Au revoir,

    Laroche





Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000