Against Petitesse and Stinginess in Modern Perfumery. A new start.

    Against Petitesse and Stinginess in Modern Perfumery. A new start.

    post #1 of 2
    Thread Starter 
    Introduction

    I once worked for a miserable, wretched little man, in every sense of those words, who wanted me to produce beautiful things in his name and on his behalf, but with neither a budget nor a staff. I tried in vain to explain what he never seems to have understood, and no doubt still does not today: If you want nice things, you have to pay for them. If you can't pay for them, you can't have them. Shortly thereafter, perhaps predictably, I was laid off.

    The point of this poignant little autobiographical anecdote may be conveyed equally well through a hypothetical thought experiment. Imagine that someone invited you to a five-star restaurant and then, indignantly decrying the menu prices, asked you to drink only water and to stare at an empty plate while he ate the least expensive appetizer. You might want to say that he was a despicable cheapskate, but it would be in no way unreasonable for you to claim, I think, that your host was simply insane.

    Perfume is a luxury. There are plenty of people on this planet who have never sniffed the stuff and certainly do not have the time to learn how to distinguish a chypre from an oriental from a fruity-floral perfume. They are too busy trying to locate some potable water or gather up food for their next day's meals or even to find a shelter in which to sleep.

    This context makes it puzzling to me that there should be so much manifest pettiness in the world of perfume today. It is high time that perfumistas everywhere united to take the villains to task. We, as patrons of perfume houses and purveyors, are not their slaves but the very source of their wealth. It is just, therefore, and necessary that we assert our rights before them.
    post #2 of 2
    Good blog.

    If I don't get top service from a company or store, I can easily buy something somewhere else--period. And I have.
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    8/25/11 at 7:20am

    sherapop said:



    Introduction

    I once worked for a miserable, wretched little man, in every sense of those words, who wanted me to produce beautiful things in his name and on his behalf, but with neither a budget nor a staff. I tried in vain to explain what he never seems to have understood, and no doubt still does not today: If you want nice things, you have to pay for them. If you can't pay for them, you can't have them. Shortly thereafter, perhaps predictably, I was laid off.

    The point of this poignant little autobiographical anecdote may be conveyed equally well through a hypothetical thought experiment. Imagine that someone invited you to a five-star restaurant and then, indignantly decrying the menu prices, asked you to drink only water and to stare at an empty plate while he ate the least expensive appetizer. You might want to say that he was a despicable cheapskate, but it would be in no way unreasonable for you to claim, I think, that your host was simply insane.

    Perfume is a luxury. There are plenty of people on this planet who have never sniffed the stuff and certainly do not have the time to learn how to distinguish a chypre from an oriental from a fruity-floral perfume. They are too busy trying to locate some potable water or gather up food for their next day's meals or even to find a shelter in which to sleep.

    This context makes it puzzling to me that there should be so much manifest pettiness in the world of perfume today. It is high time that perfumistas everywhere united to take the villains to task. We, as patrons of perfume houses and purveyors, are not their slaves but the very source of their wealth. It is just, therefore, and necessary that we assert our rights before them.

    8/26/11 at 12:33pm

    Primrose said:



    Good blog.

    If I don't get top service from a company or store, I can easily buy something somewhere else--period. And I have.





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