100 Fragrances Every Frag-Head Guy Should Try, part 11: Creed & the Aquatics

    100 Fragrances Every Frag-Head Guy Should Try, part 11: Creed & the Aquatics

    post #1 of 6
    Thread Starter 
    Sorry I took a little time away, but Im back!

    For those who missed the start of my little project, I was inspired by NowSmellThiss 100 Perfumes Every Perfumista Must Try. I thought it would be fun to do a men's version, or at least list with the reasoning told from a masculine point of view. Im not pretending to be an expert, just an avid fan and I look forward to seeing as many comments as possible, especially from people who disagree with my picks or have suggestions of their own. With that, we get to the dawn of modern mens perfumery:

    Creed and the Aquatics

    Whatever your opinion of Creeds questionable history and royal lineage may be, theres no denying that they pretty much rule the mens luxury fragrance market now and thats largely because of their biggest aesthetic contribution to modern perfumery, the invention and perfection of the aquatic scent.

    33. Green Irish Tweed by Creed



    In 1985, Olivier Creed (with possible uncredited help from French nose Pierre Bourdon), combined Allyl Amyl Glycolate, Dihydromyrcenol, and Ambrox and created a revolution. Somehow, this trio of ingredients combined to create a whole new kind of smell Its a weird smell that simultaneously calls to mind a murky, mossy beach and the nose-tingling ammonia in a window cleaner.

    By teaming this synthetic trio with bergamot, violet leaf, and a bunch more supporting players, Creed created a whole new perfume dynamic that almost instantly made everything else feel outdated, a deep, dark, emotionally satisfying yet moody expression of modern masculinity that, most importantly, wasnt just another woody chypre.

    34. Millésime Impérial by Creed



    Over the last 25 years, Creed has put just about any mix of ingredients it can imagine over their trademark Allyl Amyl Glycolate/Dihydromyrcenol/Ambrox aquatic mix. From deep tobacco and woods to coconut to tea, nothing has been safe from Creeds aquatic-creating tentacles. Some of these have been artistically inspiring, while others are a bit lame. I personally picked Millésime Impérial for this list because its aesthetically pleasing and also a good opposite end of the spectrum from Green Irish Tweed.

    If Green Irish Tweed is a dank, slightly moody green interpretation of aquatics, Millésime Impérial is a bright, refreshing shot of sunshine. With a nod and a wink to CK One, it uses a bright, laundry-clean mix of lemon and herbaceous greens with a pinch of melon on top of its Allyl/Dihydro/Ambrox mixture, resulting in a golden yellow shot of summertime in a bottle.

    If you only try two Creeds, I think Millésime Impérial and Green Irish Tweed are the best of the bunch, as well as giving a good sense of the two ends of the aquatic spectrum.
    post #2 of 6
    These are definitely the most important Creeds - even though I don't own either. Good call!

    I agree - these are must-sniffs. Ironically, among all of your hundred that SHOULD be sniffed by new male perfumistas, these two are almost guaranteed TO be sniffed.
    post #3 of 6
    Do you know I checked your blog EVERY DAY? Welcome back!
    post #4 of 6
    Oh my I abhor both of these, it seems this category of masculine perfumery just doesn't 'fit' me. Oh well, no biggie, there are hundreds of thousands of other scents, right?
    post #5 of 6
    I've been enjoying these blog entries as well. And they're educational: this rundown on Creed's Millesime base really suggests the reason for the polarity of this house. It didn't occur to me until today when I sampled Tabarome Millesime for the first time. What the heck is this, I wondered, an aquatic with a bit of tobacco tossed in? Very odd on my skin, to put it favorably. If you like this base, I'm sure you'd like most Creeds, if not, well... thanks for the insight!
    post #6 of 6
    I wish i could understand the love for Millesime Imperial, wich smells to me just like a cheap violet aroma that a lot of masculine cheap fragrances are based on. It has a really plastic aroma...
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    10/16/11 at 4:52pm

    rogalal said:



    Sorry I took a little time away, but Im back!

    For those who missed the start of my little project, I was inspired by NowSmellThiss 100 Perfumes Every Perfumista Must Try. I thought it would be fun to do a men's version, or at least list with the reasoning told from a masculine point of view. Im not pretending to be an expert, just an avid fan and I look forward to seeing as many comments as possible, especially from people who disagree with my picks or have suggestions of their own. With that, we get to the dawn of modern mens perfumery:

    Creed and the Aquatics

    Whatever your opinion of Creeds questionable history and royal lineage may be, theres no denying that they pretty much rule the mens luxury fragrance market now and thats largely because of their biggest aesthetic contribution to modern perfumery, the invention and perfection of the aquatic scent.

    33. Green Irish Tweed by Creed



    In 1985, Olivier Creed (with possible uncredited help from French nose Pierre Bourdon), combined Allyl Amyl Glycolate, Dihydromyrcenol, and Ambrox and created a revolution. Somehow, this trio of ingredients combined to create a whole new kind of smell Its a weird smell that simultaneously calls to mind a murky, mossy beach and the nose-tingling ammonia in a window cleaner.

    By teaming this synthetic trio with bergamot, violet leaf, and a bunch more supporting players, Creed created a whole new perfume dynamic that almost instantly made everything else feel outdated, a deep, dark, emotionally satisfying yet moody expression of modern masculinity that, most importantly, wasnt just another woody chypre.

    34. Millésime Impérial by Creed



    Over the last 25 years, Creed has put just about any mix of ingredients it can imagine over their trademark Allyl Amyl Glycolate/Dihydromyrcenol/Ambrox aquatic mix. From deep tobacco and woods to coconut to tea, nothing has been safe from Creeds aquatic-creating tentacles. Some of these have been artistically inspiring, while others are a bit lame. I personally picked Millésime Impérial for this list because its aesthetically pleasing and also a good opposite end of the spectrum from Green Irish Tweed.

    If Green Irish Tweed is a dank, slightly moody green interpretation of aquatics, Millésime Impérial is a bright, refreshing shot of sunshine. With a nod and a wink to CK One, it uses a bright, laundry-clean mix of lemon and herbaceous greens with a pinch of melon on top of its Allyl/Dihydro/Ambrox mixture, resulting in a golden yellow shot of summertime in a bottle.

    If you only try two Creeds, I think Millésime Impérial and Green Irish Tweed are the best of the bunch, as well as giving a good sense of the two ends of the aquatic spectrum.

    10/17/11 at 9:06pm

    Redneck Perfumisto said:



    These are definitely the most important Creeds - even though I don't own either. Good call!

    I agree - these are must-sniffs. Ironically, among all of your hundred that SHOULD be sniffed by new male perfumistas, these two are almost guaranteed TO be sniffed.

    10/18/11 at 6:05pm

    jujy54 said:



    Do you know I checked your blog EVERY DAY? Welcome back!

    10/22/11 at 3:33pm

    mikeperez23 said:



    Oh my I abhor both of these, it seems this category of masculine perfumery just doesn't 'fit' me. Oh well, no biggie, there are hundreds of thousands of other scents, right?

    11/3/11 at 10:14pm

    Al Gae said:



    I've been enjoying these blog entries as well. And they're educational: this rundown on Creed's Millesime base really suggests the reason for the polarity of this house. It didn't occur to me until today when I sampled Tabarome Millesime for the first time. What the heck is this, I wondered, an aquatic with a bit of tobacco tossed in? Very odd on my skin, to put it favorably. If you like this base, I'm sure you'd like most Creeds, if not, well... thanks for the insight!

    11/19/11 at 6:25pm

    rickbr said:



    I wish i could understand the love for Millesime Imperial, wich smells to me just like a cheap violet aroma that a lot of masculine cheap fragrances are based on. It has a really plastic aroma...





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