how to classify fragrances/develop my "nose"

    how to classify fragrances/develop my "nose"

    post #1 of 8
    Thread Starter 

    hi everyone,

    i am new to this and want to become more astute where my fragrances are concerned. as i read your comments i notice scents being called a leather or a floral and such. the list below are my fragrances. can someone tell me which they are?  how do i become more knowlegdeable.  is there a book, website, resource i can refer to?  

    Montale Red Vetyver

    Atelier Trefle Pur

    Czech & Speake no. 88

    Comme des Garcons Amazingreen

    Etro Heliotrope

    Serge Lutens Chergui

    Annick Goutal Eau D'Hadrien

    M.Micallef Emir

    Caron Yatagan

    Van Cleef & Arpels Midnight in Paris

    thank you all in advance

    post #2 of 8
    I would say that this website is a very good source of enlightenment. I have learned a great deal from the very knowledgeable people here who share their opinions, thoughts and experience. Just stick around and explore the different forums.
    post #3 of 8

    There are many classifications, one you can find easily is Edward's

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fragrance_wheel

    But this is only one of the possible ones, and it is also a little more difficult to understand for a new person. The Osmotheque (the perfume museum in Versailles) also publishes a more straightforward (though perhaps less complete) classification des parfums, but unfortunately their book is not distributed in the US. Also, I have found Roja Dove's book the essence of perfume a good starter, though it's quite simple and a touch dull.

     

    As hednic was saying, there's really no substitute to smelling many frags and learning to recognize the main notes.

     

    In your list, Eau d'Hadrien is a citrus, Amazingreen green-woody, Yatagan is woody with a green top, Heliotrope is technically a floral, though it smells almondy (ie gourmand).

     

    cacio

    post #4 of 8
    For me it was just about taking the time to study the scents and allow my mind to "get wired up" to understand many of the notes. My blog has some articles about ways to think about notes. For example, herbal notes tend to be dry and have a kind of sandpaper texture. Other things notes can provide include richness, body, and directionality.
    post #5 of 8
    Thread Starter 

    thank you so much for the info but more importantly for replying specifically in identifying some of my fragrances, funny i would have never thought of Heliotrope as a floral.  thank you very much.  i will follow your advice about smelling many fragrances (the idea is fun!)  but i first must know generally, i suppose, what a leather smells like, what vetyver, etc smell like how in the world do i give my nose a base/basic scent inventory first to be able to differentiate scents/specific ingredients in a fragrance later?  i am very new to this but i want to be knowledgeable.  thanks for your time and help

    post #6 of 8

    Just tap in ' fragrance genres' on Google. There will be plenty of sites.

    post #7 of 8

    As for recognizing specific notes or materials, ideally one would want to have the material in isolation,but that's often difficult if one is not a perfumer and has the raw materials available. What one can do is to smell many frags in the same category or with the same material, and from that one should be able to get an idea of the main accord.

     

    Incidentally, many notes (like woody, leather, incense etc) do not refer to a specific material, but are often used to refer to a variety of different materials or accords that smell different. For instance, woody can refer to sharp cedar or to smooth milky sandalwood. Leather could be smooth suede or hard tanning agents.

     

    cacio

    post #8 of 8
    todg~~& all responders on this thread~~I'm a perfume virgin too, this is my 1st post here. I do feel a new obsession taking root. There's so much to learn & the whole subject has become a brand new fascination for me. The OP took the words right out of my mouth....I want to develop a "nose" if that is possible. Is it a talent, meaning something you're born with? or is it something that can be taught?
    I'm an artist and have worked in several media, mostly glass, fibers, and needlework, color being my mainstay. I've also had a gardening (flowers mostly) obsession for many decades so botanicals, ornamental horticulture, herbals and finally aromatherapy and art-soapmaking lead me directly into the fine art of perfumery.
    It's the aesthetic value of fragrance that's so exciting to me. I've also been collecting catalytic fragrance lamps and making my own scented fuel which is likewise a lovely smelling activity. I'm not that much of a purist since using essential oils with fragrance lamps and soaps is too expensive for me. I do use the synthetic knock-off designer fragrance oils from Saveonscents.com in my lamp fuel & soap, and they are superb, not cheap smelling whatsoever. For example, even what I'd consider a cheap perfume (Victoria's Secret Very Sexy) is exceptional. Their designer fragrances are likewise exquisite, believe it or not.
    I have learned that first impressions of a fragrance can be misleading since several essential oils I disliked at first have grown on me, kinda like the taste for beer! Another request for help is in my search for a good, strong neroli that has lasting power, and is fairly inexpensive. happy.gif

    At any rate, any suggestions or guide to educating myself would be greatly appreciated. smiley.gif
    : > ) : >
    class="

    6/14/13 at 6:07am

    todg said:



    hi everyone,

    i am new to this and want to become more astute where my fragrances are concerned. as i read your comments i notice scents being called a leather or a floral and such. the list below are my fragrances. can someone tell me which they are?  how do i become more knowlegdeable.  is there a book, website, resource i can refer to?  

    Montale Red Vetyver

    Atelier Trefle Pur

    Czech & Speake no. 88

    Comme des Garcons Amazingreen

    Etro Heliotrope

    Serge Lutens Chergui

    Annick Goutal Eau D'Hadrien

    M.Micallef Emir

    Caron Yatagan

    Van Cleef & Arpels Midnight in Paris

    thank you all in advance

    6/14/13 at 7:00am

    hednic said:



    I would say that this website is a very good source of enlightenment. I have learned a great deal from the very knowledgeable people here who share their opinions, thoughts and experience. Just stick around and explore the different forums.

    6/14/13 at 7:12am

    cacio said:



    There are many classifications, one you can find easily is Edward's

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fragrance_wheel

    But this is only one of the possible ones, and it is also a little more difficult to understand for a new person. The Osmotheque (the perfume museum in Versailles) also publishes a more straightforward (though perhaps less complete) classification des parfums, but unfortunately their book is not distributed in the US. Also, I have found Roja Dove's book the essence of perfume a good starter, though it's quite simple and a touch dull.

     

    As hednic was saying, there's really no substitute to smelling many frags and learning to recognize the main notes.

     

    In your list, Eau d'Hadrien is a citrus, Amazingreen green-woody, Yatagan is woody with a green top, Heliotrope is technically a floral, though it smells almondy (ie gourmand).

     

    cacio

    6/14/13 at 8:11am

    Bigsly said:



    For me it was just about taking the time to study the scents and allow my mind to "get wired up" to understand many of the notes. My blog has some articles about ways to think about notes. For example, herbal notes tend to be dry and have a kind of sandpaper texture. Other things notes can provide include richness, body, and directionality.

    6/17/13 at 6:20am

    todg said:



    thank you so much for the info but more importantly for replying specifically in identifying some of my fragrances, funny i would have never thought of Heliotrope as a floral.  thank you very much.  i will follow your advice about smelling many fragrances (the idea is fun!)  but i first must know generally, i suppose, what a leather smells like, what vetyver, etc smell like how in the world do i give my nose a base/basic scent inventory first to be able to differentiate scents/specific ingredients in a fragrance later?  i am very new to this but i want to be knowledgeable.  thanks for your time and help

    6/17/13 at 7:10am

    Kaern said:



    Just tap in ' fragrance genres' on Google. There will be plenty of sites.

    6/17/13 at 10:11am

    cacio said:



    As for recognizing specific notes or materials, ideally one would want to have the material in isolation,but that's often difficult if one is not a perfumer and has the raw materials available. What one can do is to smell many frags in the same category or with the same material, and from that one should be able to get an idea of the main accord.

     

    Incidentally, many notes (like woody, leather, incense etc) do not refer to a specific material, but are often used to refer to a variety of different materials or accords that smell different. For instance, woody can refer to sharp cedar or to smooth milky sandalwood. Leather could be smooth suede or hard tanning agents.

     

    cacio

    9/10/13 at 12:00pm

    scbennett said:



    todg~~& all responders on this thread~~I'm a perfume virgin too, this is my 1st post here. I do feel a new obsession taking root. There's so much to learn & the whole subject has become a brand new fascination for me. The OP took the words right out of my mouth....I want to develop a "nose" if that is possible. Is it a talent, meaning something you're born with? or is it something that can be taught?
    I'm an artist and have worked in several media, mostly glass, fibers, and needlework, color being my mainstay. I've also had a gardening (flowers mostly) obsession for many decades so botanicals, ornamental horticulture, herbals and finally aromatherapy and art-soapmaking lead me directly into the fine art of perfumery.
    It's the aesthetic value of fragrance that's so exciting to me. I've also been collecting catalytic fragrance lamps and making my own scented fuel which is likewise a lovely smelling activity. I'm not that much of a purist since using essential oils with fragrance lamps and soaps is too expensive for me. I do use the synthetic knock-off designer fragrance oils from Saveonscents.com in my lamp fuel & soap, and they are superb, not cheap smelling whatsoever. For example, even what I'd consider a cheap perfume (Victoria's Secret Very Sexy) is exceptional. Their designer fragrances are likewise exquisite, believe it or not.
    I have learned that first impressions of a fragrance can be misleading since several essential oils I disliked at first have grown on me, kinda like the taste for beer! Another request for help is in my search for a good, strong neroli that has lasting power, and is fairly inexpensive. happy.gif

    At any rate, any suggestions or guide to educating myself would be greatly appreciated. smiley.gif
    : > ) : >