What does "BALMY" mean anyway?

    What does "BALMY" mean anyway?

    post #1 of 11
    Thread Starter 

      I see the word "balmy" used a lot when people describe fragrances.

     

     

      I was beginning to think it meant something along the lines of thick, dense, and heavy, but I've also seen it used to mean soft and enveloping, which isn't necessarily the same thing. Ambre Russe and Eau Sauvage Parfum are thick and heavy, imo, but they're not soft. Givenchy Play Intense is soft and enveloping to some extent, but it's not necessarily heavy. Both have been described as "balmy"...whatever that means. 

     

     

       And then more recently I saw the term "balmy" used to connote camphor.  I think drseid said something like, "It's a very balmy fragrance. Think Tiger Balm," or something to that effect, which is a very different interpretation than the other two, a much more literal interpretation.  But unless I'm mistaken, there's no camphor whatsoever in Eau Sauvage Parfum, Ambre Russe, or Givenchy Play Intense, so this would suggest a completely different meaning than the "balmy" that's used to describe them.

     

      I suppose a fragrance could be both definitions of balmy...but that's not the point.

     

     

      So what's going on here?

     

     Any experts care to chime in?   I'd like to try to pin down a correct definition of the term. 

     

     

     Btw, drseid, if I misquoted you or completely mistook you for someone else, my apologies, I'm going off memory. 


    Edited by Buysblind - 6/18/13 at 3:51pm
    post #2 of 11
    No expert here. My guess - I understand it to me soothing with a slightly medicinal quality/vibe/feeling.
    post #3 of 11
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hednic View Post

    No expert here. My guess - I understand it to me soothing with a slightly medicinal quality/vibe/feeling.

     

       

         Appreciate your input.

    post #4 of 11

    This is a good question !

    post #5 of 11

    As usual, I don't think it is a technical term, nor that there is a unique definition. As you point out, people use it for different purposes. Either to mean warm and soothing, or, possibly less often, to mean something like a balm, whatever the balm one has in mind. In this latter sense, it might be perhaps better to use different terms, like balsamic (for resins) or camphoraceous,

     

    cacio

    post #6 of 11

    Well, Dictionary.com describes 'balmy' as:

     
    1. mild and refreshing; soft; soothing: balmy weather.
    2. having the qualities of balm; aromatic; fragrant: balmy leaves.

     

     

    I concur with cacio.  That is how I would use the word, using it for warm and soothing.

    post #7 of 11

    happy,joyous. something that puts a smile on your face

    post #8 of 11
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Nymphaea View Post

    Well, Dictionary.com describes 'balmy' as:

     
    1. mild and refreshing; soft; soothing: balmy weather.
    2. having the qualities of balm; aromatic; fragrant: balmy leaves.

     

     

    English is not my mother tongue, of course, but when I use balmy I think of something that is both soothing etc and has balsamic, aromatic qualities. A scent can be soft, soothing, comforting without being balsamic (i.e- benzoin) or being aromatic without being soft (i.e.- mint). In my own language- Italian- we have a single word for it, balsamico, that translates better with balmy than with the almost identical balsamic...

    post #9 of 11
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cacio View Post

    As usual, I don't think it is a technical term, nor that there is a unique definition. As you point out, people use it for different purposes. Either to mean warm and soothing, or, possibly less often, to mean something like a balm, whatever the balm one has in mind. In this latter sense, it might be perhaps better to use different terms, like balsamic (for resins) or camphoraceous,

     

    cacio

     

       Nice summation, Cacio.  I ended up posting this thread in the male forum as it was moving so slowly over here at first.  The way you just broke it down kind of summarizes the entire discussion that took place over there. 

    post #10 of 11

    I'm glad this question was asked, i always assumed it referred to a sort of medicinal soft petroleum wax smell like lip balm!  No wonder i couldn't find a balmy fragrance....guess what, i still can't lol  I don't have a damn clue.

    post #11 of 11

    "Balmy Days & Sundays by Ineke"

    Seems this fragrance would clear it up.

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    6/18/13 at 3:37pm

    Buysblind said:



      I see the word "balmy" used a lot when people describe fragrances.

     

     

      I was beginning to think it meant something along the lines of thick, dense, and heavy, but I've also seen it used to mean soft and enveloping, which isn't necessarily the same thing. Ambre Russe and Eau Sauvage Parfum are thick and heavy, imo, but they're not soft. Givenchy Play Intense is soft and enveloping to some extent, but it's not necessarily heavy. Both have been described as "balmy"...whatever that means. 

     

     

       And then more recently I saw the term "balmy" used to connote camphor.  I think drseid said something like, "It's a very balmy fragrance. Think Tiger Balm," or something to that effect, which is a very different interpretation than the other two, a much more literal interpretation.  But unless I'm mistaken, there's no camphor whatsoever in Eau Sauvage Parfum, Ambre Russe, or Givenchy Play Intense, so this would suggest a completely different meaning than the "balmy" that's used to describe them.

     

      I suppose a fragrance could be both definitions of balmy...but that's not the point.

     

     

      So what's going on here?

     

     Any experts care to chime in?   I'd like to try to pin down a correct definition of the term. 

     

     

     Btw, drseid, if I misquoted you or completely mistook you for someone else, my apologies, I'm going off memory. 


    Edited by Buysblind - 6/18/13 at 3:51pm

    6/18/13 at 7:07pm

    hednic said:



    No expert here. My guess - I understand it to me soothing with a slightly medicinal quality/vibe/feeling.

    6/19/13 at 3:58am

    Buysblind said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hednic View Post

    No expert here. My guess - I understand it to me soothing with a slightly medicinal quality/vibe/feeling.

     

       

         Appreciate your input.

    6/19/13 at 9:36am

    Birdboy48 said:



    This is a good question !

    6/19/13 at 10:35am

    cacio said:



    As usual, I don't think it is a technical term, nor that there is a unique definition. As you point out, people use it for different purposes. Either to mean warm and soothing, or, possibly less often, to mean something like a balm, whatever the balm one has in mind. In this latter sense, it might be perhaps better to use different terms, like balsamic (for resins) or camphoraceous,

     

    cacio

    6/19/13 at 12:01pm

    Nymphaea said:



    Well, Dictionary.com describes 'balmy' as:

     
    1. mild and refreshing; soft; soothing: balmy weather.
    2. having the qualities of balm; aromatic; fragrant: balmy leaves.

     

     

    I concur with cacio.  That is how I would use the word, using it for warm and soothing.

    6/19/13 at 12:12pm

    Tony T said:



    happy,joyous. something that puts a smile on your face

    6/19/13 at 12:19pm

    iodine said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Nymphaea View Post

    Well, Dictionary.com describes 'balmy' as:

     
    1. mild and refreshing; soft; soothing: balmy weather.
    2. having the qualities of balm; aromatic; fragrant: balmy leaves.

     

     

    English is not my mother tongue, of course, but when I use balmy I think of something that is both soothing etc and has balsamic, aromatic qualities. A scent can be soft, soothing, comforting without being balsamic (i.e- benzoin) or being aromatic without being soft (i.e.- mint). In my own language- Italian- we have a single word for it, balsamico, that translates better with balmy than with the almost identical balsamic...

    6/19/13 at 12:37pm

    Buysblind said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cacio View Post

    As usual, I don't think it is a technical term, nor that there is a unique definition. As you point out, people use it for different purposes. Either to mean warm and soothing, or, possibly less often, to mean something like a balm, whatever the balm one has in mind. In this latter sense, it might be perhaps better to use different terms, like balsamic (for resins) or camphoraceous,

     

    cacio

     

       Nice summation, Cacio.  I ended up posting this thread in the male forum as it was moving so slowly over here at first.  The way you just broke it down kind of summarizes the entire discussion that took place over there. 

    6/20/13 at 5:30pm

    Odorloader said:



    I'm glad this question was asked, i always assumed it referred to a sort of medicinal soft petroleum wax smell like lip balm!  No wonder i couldn't find a balmy fragrance....guess what, i still can't lol  I don't have a damn clue.

    6/21/13 at 5:55am

    Odorloader said:



    "Balmy Days & Sundays by Ineke"

    Seems this fragrance would clear it up.