Which vintage fragrance to get?

    Which vintage fragrance to get?

    post #1 of 20
    Thread Starter 

    I am very interested in finding a vintage perfume on eBay in which some of its ingredients are banned, and compare it to the modern reformulated version. I want to find out if it is really that different. I don't need to wear it, I just want experiment and have some fun. Any suggestions?

    post #2 of 20

    Arm yourself with patience and be prepared for some turned purchases.

    I would look into Chypre by Coty, which is essentially Chypre 1.0. It doesn't exist anymore, but it will show what a chypre should smell like. You can then compare to whatever former chypre is still on the market (Chanel pour un homme, eau sauvage, new york, mitsouko, whatever) and get angry at IFRA's restrictions. The reedition of Chypre by coty can be had for btw $50 and $100, though it doesn't appear too frequently. Unfortunately, vintage Guerlains and Chanels are simply too expensive for a casual purchase.

    Alternatively, you could check some of the masculine 80s powerhouses and see whether they still smell ok. Things like Kouros.

    cacio

    post #3 of 20
    Try to get vintage Fahrenheit and compare it with what's out there now, or vintage Eau Sauvage.
    post #4 of 20
    Thread Starter 
    Cacio, Chypre by Coty does sound interesting, because me as a fragrance newbie, don't know much about Chypre fragrances. (Coincidentally, I smelled Le Labo's Ylang 49 today, which they claim falls under the Chypre category, and I don't like it very much.)

    I saw a very small vintage Guerlain Mitsoku (spelling?) on eBay at an ok price, I bet the modern version is reformulated?

    Hednic, I have a bottle of Fahrenheit, but it's not that old (a few years old?) and I don't like it too much. When was Fahrenheit first released?
    post #5 of 20

    I don't perceive any chypre base in the Labo Ylang. It's a big floral up top, the drydown is somewhat clean and not chypre (the chypre base, if present, comes in the drydown). Indeed, there is simply no old chypre around, because the key ingredient, oakmoss, is now severely restricted. There are some fragrances that try to replicate some of the aspects of a chypre base via different combinations (eg patchouli-vetiver type of combos), but they don't smell quite like old chypres (though they may smell good on their own).

    If you are old enough (>40 yrs old), you'll certainly recognize the smell of a chypre base as something that was in the air back then, even though you won't be able to connect it to any specific perfume.

    Mitsouko has been reformulated a few times. The debate is still on about whether the current version is ok - there was some talk that the Guerlain perfumer was able to distill oakmoss without the IFRA offending component, but I don't know how it ended up.

    cacio


    Edited by cacio - 6/20/13 at 8:17am
    post #6 of 20
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Magic KetchupView Post....I want to find out if it is really that different....

    They usually are.

    post #7 of 20
    Vintage Emeraud, any good quality leather fragrance (Bandit, Cabochard), vintage VC&A's First, any good quality chypre with real oakmoss and non synthetic rose - rule of thumb: this last one should make you mouth watery.
    post #8 of 20
    I have a vintage Fahrenheit and it feels dense to the nose compared to the new one. As to Eau Sauvage, it closely smells like a more complex but still similar, less expensive version of a classic eau de cologne, as attested in a hand to hand comparison with a cheapy, Agua de Pravia, by Puig (not Heno de Pravia, that is a different one).
    post #9 of 20
    I have a very early Fahrenheit as well (the one with the yellow crescent on the box) and it is noticeably different to the modern one. I agree its denser, smoother and develops differently on the skin.
    post #10 of 20

    Egoiste

    post #11 of 20
    Vintage Fahrenheit is an excellent choice. Another one I love is Egoiste Cologne Concentree. And my recent re-discovery, Or Black - it is outstanding.
    post #12 of 20
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by remikView Post

    And my recent re-discovery, Or Black - it is outstanding.

    Yet another good one to compare versions of.
    post #13 of 20
    Diorella, Eau Sauvage, Vent Vert, Jolie Madame, Bandit, Mitsouko, L'Heure Bleue, Emeraude, L'Origan, Chypre (good luck finding the real deal parfum), Diorissimo, etc.
    post #14 of 20

    Eau Sauvage

    post #15 of 20
    An inexpensive way to go is to buy vintage from a decanting service, find out what you like, and then start your quest for a vintage bottle.
    post #16 of 20
    Thread Starter 

    Finally smelledMitsouko for the first time at a department store and I loved it. For some reasons the musky note smells delicious like chicken wings LOL. Since it smells very good already, I wonder if a vintage version would reason smell any greater?

    BTW I also smelled Guerlain Vetiver for the first time - it smelled like mouthwash?

    post #17 of 20

    Well, if you like Mitsouko, you're likely going to like other chypres as well. I have not smelled the latest, so I don't know how it compares, but oakmoss shines especially in the base, so perhaps the modern isn't as long lasting as the old.

    Vetivers in general smell fresh and slightly green-grassy. Some people love them, some people don't. With time, you'll probably encounter a few more, after which you'll be able to see if you don't like this specific one, or you don't like vetiver per se.

    cacio

    post #18 of 20
    I was just sorting some bottles in my collection and found an old, vintage bottle of Cool Water. Lord almighty, that is some great stuff. The current formulation is like 10 times diluted version of that. Vintage Cool Water beats the crap out of the almighty GIT.... which I own, like, and wear frequently in the summer. If you can find a vintage bottle of Cool Water, with script lettering - BUY IT!!

    6/19/13 at 5:12pm

    Magic Ketchup said:



    I am very interested in finding a vintage perfume on eBay in which some of its ingredients are banned, and compare it to the modern reformulated version. I want to find out if it is really that different. I don't need to wear it, I just want experiment and have some fun. Any suggestions?

    6/19/13 at 7:11pm

    cacio said:



    Arm yourself with patience and be prepared for some turned purchases.

    I would look into Chypre by Coty, which is essentially Chypre 1.0. It doesn't exist anymore, but it will show what a chypre should smell like. You can then compare to whatever former chypre is still on the market (Chanel pour un homme, eau sauvage, new york, mitsouko, whatever) and get angry at IFRA's restrictions. The reedition of Chypre by coty can be had for btw $50 and $100, though it doesn't appear too frequently. Unfortunately, vintage Guerlains and Chanels are simply too expensive for a casual purchase.

    Alternatively, you could check some of the masculine 80s powerhouses and see whether they still smell ok. Things like Kouros.

    cacio

    6/19/13 at 7:28pm

    hednic said:



    Try to get vintage Fahrenheit and compare it with what's out there now, or vintage Eau Sauvage.

    6/19/13 at 8:24pm

    Magic Ketchup said:



    Cacio, Chypre by Coty does sound interesting, because me as a fragrance newbie, don't know much about Chypre fragrances. (Coincidentally, I smelled Le Labo's Ylang 49 today, which they claim falls under the Chypre category, and I don't like it very much.)

    I saw a very small vintage Guerlain Mitsoku (spelling?) on eBay at an ok price, I bet the modern version is reformulated?

    Hednic, I have a bottle of Fahrenheit, but it's not that old (a few years old?) and I don't like it too much. When was Fahrenheit first released?

    6/19/13 at 8:56pm

    cacio said:



    I don't perceive any chypre base in the Labo Ylang. It's a big floral up top, the drydown is somewhat clean and not chypre (the chypre base, if present, comes in the drydown). Indeed, there is simply no old chypre around, because the key ingredient, oakmoss, is now severely restricted. There are some fragrances that try to replicate some of the aspects of a chypre base via different combinations (eg patchouli-vetiver type of combos), but they don't smell quite like old chypres (though they may smell good on their own).

    If you are old enough (>40 yrs old), you'll certainly recognize the smell of a chypre base as something that was in the air back then, even though you won't be able to connect it to any specific perfume.

    Mitsouko has been reformulated a few times. The debate is still on about whether the current version is ok - there was some talk that the Guerlain perfumer was able to distill oakmoss without the IFRA offending component, but I don't know how it ended up.

    cacio


    Edited by cacio - 6/20/13 at 8:17am

    6/20/13 at 6:16am

    pluran said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Magic KetchupView Post....I want to find out if it is really that different....

    They usually are.

    6/20/13 at 6:33am

    Pollux said:



    Vintage Emeraud, any good quality leather fragrance (Bandit, Cabochard), vintage VC&A's First, any good quality chypre with real oakmoss and non synthetic rose - rule of thumb: this last one should make you mouth watery.

    6/20/13 at 6:37am

    Pollux said:



    I have a vintage Fahrenheit and it feels dense to the nose compared to the new one. As to Eau Sauvage, it closely smells like a more complex but still similar, less expensive version of a classic eau de cologne, as attested in a hand to hand comparison with a cheapy, Agua de Pravia, by Puig (not Heno de Pravia, that is a different one).

    6/20/13 at 6:49am

    Xscent said:



    I have a very early Fahrenheit as well (the one with the yellow crescent on the box) and it is noticeably different to the modern one. I agree its denser, smoother and develops differently on the skin.

    6/20/13 at 9:08am

    mccann690 said:



    Egoiste

    6/20/13 at 9:13am

    remik said:



    Vintage Fahrenheit is an excellent choice. Another one I love is Egoiste Cologne Concentree. And my recent re-discovery, Or Black - it is outstanding.

    6/23/13 at 9:55am

    hednic said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by remikView Post

    And my recent re-discovery, Or Black - it is outstanding.

    Yet another good one to compare versions of.

    6/23/13 at 10:55am

    treeman5823 said:



    Diorella, Eau Sauvage, Vent Vert, Jolie Madame, Bandit, Mitsouko, L'Heure Bleue, Emeraude, L'Origan, Chypre (good luck finding the real deal parfum), Diorissimo, etc.

    6/23/13 at 1:38pm

    Tony T said:



    Eau Sauvage

    6/23/13 at 5:50pm

    Curly11 said:



    An inexpensive way to go is to buy vintage from a decanting service, find out what you like, and then start your quest for a vintage bottle.

    6/23/13 at 7:13pm

    Magic Ketchup said:



    Finally smelledMitsouko for the first time at a department store and I loved it. For some reasons the musky note smells delicious like chicken wings LOL. Since it smells very good already, I wonder if a vintage version would reason smell any greater?

    BTW I also smelled Guerlain Vetiver for the first time - it smelled like mouthwash?

    6/23/13 at 7:42pm

    cacio said:



    Well, if you like Mitsouko, you're likely going to like other chypres as well. I have not smelled the latest, so I don't know how it compares, but oakmoss shines especially in the base, so perhaps the modern isn't as long lasting as the old.

    Vetivers in general smell fresh and slightly green-grassy. Some people love them, some people don't. With time, you'll probably encounter a few more, after which you'll be able to see if you don't like this specific one, or you don't like vetiver per se.

    cacio

    6/24/13 at 11:32am

    remik said:



    I was just sorting some bottles in my collection and found an old, vintage bottle of Cool Water. Lord almighty, that is some great stuff. The current formulation is like 10 times diluted version of that. Vintage Cool Water beats the crap out of the almighty GIT.... which I own, like, and wear frequently in the summer. If you can find a vintage bottle of Cool Water, with script lettering - BUY IT!!





Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000