IFRA regulations 2013

    IFRA regulations 2013

    post #1 of 11
    Thread Starter 

    Now we're at the midpoint of 2013, I've been wondering about the current situation with IFRA.

    To be more specific, does anyone know whether further restrictions are expected for 2013/14, and if so when they will come into effect? Will we know about them in advance so that we can begin to stockpile?

    I recall reading some scary (and maybe overdone) stories about possible restrictions on lemon, jasmine, rose, clove, etc. If they turn out to be true, thousands of fragrances - even in their current state - will be doomed. I'd hate to be caught napping.

    post #2 of 11

    There are normally updates on this subject in a 'sticky' in the DIY Section, but alternative ingredients are also being used too.

    The IFRA website has some information.

    post #3 of 11
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by saminlondonView Post

    Now we're at the midpoint of 2013, I've been wondering about the current situation with IFRA.

    To be more specific, does anyone know whether further restrictions are expected for 2013/14, and if so when they will come into effect? Will we know about them in advance so that we can begin to stockpile?

    I recall reading some scary (and maybe overdone) stories about possible restrictions on lemon, jasmine, rose, clove, etc. If they turn out to be true, thousands of fragrances - even in their current state - will be doomed. I'd hate to be caught napping.


    There are already regulations on all of the ingredients you mentioned. Not banned, but perfumers are only allowed to use certain amounts within a composition. It's that way for most naturals, and more are on the way.

    post #4 of 11
    Thread Starter 

    Thank you. I know that the changes are incremental, but I suppose what I'm asking is: are we expecting a new raft of rules so drastic that fragrances currently in the shops will need to be reformulated beyond all recognition?

    The recent restriction of oakmoss and other ingredients was a big shock, but several newspaper articles at the end of last year seemed to suggest that oakmoss and tree moss could be banned outright, while citral, coumarin and eugenol (maybe others too?) would be severely restricted. While previous changes were self- (IFRA-) imposed, these would be imposed by the EU, if they chose to adopt the recommendations.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/12/16/us-france-perfume-idUSBRE8BF02D20121216

    Does anyone know the latest on this?

    post #5 of 11
    I find all of this about restrictions on what can or cannot be used very informative and interesting, but as a collector it doesn't bother me or make me nervous at all. Now, if i were a perfumer it would be a different story for me.
    post #6 of 11

    The restrictions show no sign of stopping and I fear perfumers will be forced to rely solely on synthetics in the future. Then there will be restrictions on certain chemicals and eventually the whole industry will grind to a halt. That's my cheery outlook anyway in this litigious world cry.gif

    Hopefully not in my lifetime though happy.gif

    post #7 of 11

    A difficult subject, although I believe that some Houses have started using other, as yet unregulated, naturals in compositions.

    It is certainly a challenging time for perfumers for many reasons in my opinion.

    post #8 of 11
    Back in 2005 (I think) when The Guide appeared, Tania Sanchez said words to the effect of 'if you love it grab a couple of back ups NOW because tomorrow it may be different'.

    She was right and the recent slim 'follow up' from LT & TS is a sad indictment of what the IFRA was complicit in allowing the EU to do to the industry.

    I see questions from time to time here along the lines of 'will it get worse?'. Well, ask yourself. You have a clutch of scientists and researchers employed on a government project, presumably with decent holidays and benefits, whose sole mandate is to find 'potential allergens' and whatnot in natural materials and their derivatives.

    Do you honestly think they are gonna turn round to their EU employers and say 'hey, done all we can, we reckon the perfume guys are good to go now - thanks and we're out of here'?

    Of course it's going to get worse.
    post #9 of 11

    There are still people working outside the regulations, albeit with increasing difficulty.

    Perhaps novel approaches are required these days - just a personal opinion as usual from me.

    post #10 of 11

    I have little concern with the future of perfumery; Perfumers will make the best of what they have. What does concern me is the rapid change in regulations, so that today's launch has to be reformulated tomorrow. Perfumers will not dare to use "suspect" materials for fear of them being banned in the further, their creativity will be compromised. However what upsets me is the fate of the older, classics; they have already been compromised, and will soon be destroyed. No Chypres, no Fougeres. They will exist in name only. This has already happened, and will get worse.

    post #11 of 11

    Yep, they are not paying these scientists *not* to find things. "Doing a good job" pretty much by definition means finding more "dangerous" ingredients.

    David is right : Perfumers will work with whatever they have, so they will always have work. But at the same time, I rarely hear rave reviews of frags that have been reformulated, so it's hard not to see these restrictions as having a negative impact on what's possible.

    The part about even recent releases needing to be reformulated is something I think all aficionados are distressed by though. A person likes to think they have an understanding of things, but these days when I read back over the reviews in the directory, I have no idea what kind of faith I can put in them. Which of any number of iterations is the reviewer talking about ? The "real" stuff, or the "shadow of it's former self" stuff ? There is no way to really tell. And to think that this is only going to be a continuing problem, even with frags we think of as new on the market ?

    When members of a groups can't trust that they are all talking about the same thing, those sorts of uncertainties don't provide much of a foundation for a hobby I'm afraid. Just look at all the anguish the Creed-heads go through. I can't imagine it's fun for them.

    Of course the public just buys what's there at the counter, so perhaps it won't make much of an impact on sales as far as the manufacturers are concerned, but it sews distrust and uncertainty, and puts the hobby on a shaky footing I think. Particularly for those who may be new to it.

    class="

    6/20/13 at 3:50am

    saminlondon said:



    Now we're at the midpoint of 2013, I've been wondering about the current situation with IFRA.

    To be more specific, does anyone know whether further restrictions are expected for 2013/14, and if so when they will come into effect? Will we know about them in advance so that we can begin to stockpile?

    I recall reading some scary (and maybe overdone) stories about possible restrictions on lemon, jasmine, rose, clove, etc. If they turn out to be true, thousands of fragrances - even in their current state - will be doomed. I'd hate to be caught napping.

    6/20/13 at 4:42am

    lpp said:



    There are normally updates on this subject in a 'sticky' in the DIY Section, but alternative ingredients are also being used too.

    The IFRA website has some information.

    6/20/13 at 6:05am

    pluran said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by saminlondonView Post

    Now we're at the midpoint of 2013, I've been wondering about the current situation with IFRA.

    To be more specific, does anyone know whether further restrictions are expected for 2013/14, and if so when they will come into effect? Will we know about them in advance so that we can begin to stockpile?

    I recall reading some scary (and maybe overdone) stories about possible restrictions on lemon, jasmine, rose, clove, etc. If they turn out to be true, thousands of fragrances - even in their current state - will be doomed. I'd hate to be caught napping.


    There are already regulations on all of the ingredients you mentioned. Not banned, but perfumers are only allowed to use certain amounts within a composition. It's that way for most naturals, and more are on the way.

    6/20/13 at 6:29am

    saminlondon said:



    Thank you. I know that the changes are incremental, but I suppose what I'm asking is: are we expecting a new raft of rules so drastic that fragrances currently in the shops will need to be reformulated beyond all recognition?

    The recent restriction of oakmoss and other ingredients was a big shock, but several newspaper articles at the end of last year seemed to suggest that oakmoss and tree moss could be banned outright, while citral, coumarin and eugenol (maybe others too?) would be severely restricted. While previous changes were self- (IFRA-) imposed, these would be imposed by the EU, if they chose to adopt the recommendations.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/12/16/us-france-perfume-idUSBRE8BF02D20121216

    Does anyone know the latest on this?

    6/20/13 at 6:45am

    hednic said:



    I find all of this about restrictions on what can or cannot be used very informative and interesting, but as a collector it doesn't bother me or make me nervous at all. Now, if i were a perfumer it would be a different story for me.

    6/20/13 at 6:55am

    Kaern said:



    The restrictions show no sign of stopping and I fear perfumers will be forced to rely solely on synthetics in the future. Then there will be restrictions on certain chemicals and eventually the whole industry will grind to a halt. That's my cheery outlook anyway in this litigious world cry.gif

    Hopefully not in my lifetime though happy.gif

    6/20/13 at 9:14am

    lpp said:



    A difficult subject, although I believe that some Houses have started using other, as yet unregulated, naturals in compositions.

    It is certainly a challenging time for perfumers for many reasons in my opinion.

    6/21/13 at 9:01pm

    mr. reasonable said:



    Back in 2005 (I think) when The Guide appeared, Tania Sanchez said words to the effect of 'if you love it grab a couple of back ups NOW because tomorrow it may be different'.

    She was right and the recent slim 'follow up' from LT & TS is a sad indictment of what the IFRA was complicit in allowing the EU to do to the industry.

    I see questions from time to time here along the lines of 'will it get worse?'. Well, ask yourself. You have a clutch of scientists and researchers employed on a government project, presumably with decent holidays and benefits, whose sole mandate is to find 'potential allergens' and whatnot in natural materials and their derivatives.

    Do you honestly think they are gonna turn round to their EU employers and say 'hey, done all we can, we reckon the perfume guys are good to go now - thanks and we're out of here'?

    Of course it's going to get worse.

    6/22/13 at 2:02am

    lpp said:



    There are still people working outside the regulations, albeit with increasing difficulty.

    Perhaps novel approaches are required these days - just a personal opinion as usual from me.

    6/22/13 at 2:14am

    David Ruskin said:



    I have little concern with the future of perfumery; Perfumers will make the best of what they have. What does concern me is the rapid change in regulations, so that today's launch has to be reformulated tomorrow. Perfumers will not dare to use "suspect" materials for fear of them being banned in the further, their creativity will be compromised. However what upsets me is the fate of the older, classics; they have already been compromised, and will soon be destroyed. No Chypres, no Fougeres. They will exist in name only. This has already happened, and will get worse.

    6/22/13 at 9:10am

    Birdboy48 said:



    Yep, they are not paying these scientists *not* to find things. "Doing a good job" pretty much by definition means finding more "dangerous" ingredients.

    David is right : Perfumers will work with whatever they have, so they will always have work. But at the same time, I rarely hear rave reviews of frags that have been reformulated, so it's hard not to see these restrictions as having a negative impact on what's possible.

    The part about even recent releases needing to be reformulated is something I think all aficionados are distressed by though. A person likes to think they have an understanding of things, but these days when I read back over the reviews in the directory, I have no idea what kind of faith I can put in them. Which of any number of iterations is the reviewer talking about ? The "real" stuff, or the "shadow of it's former self" stuff ? There is no way to really tell. And to think that this is only going to be a continuing problem, even with frags we think of as new on the market ?

    When members of a groups can't trust that they are all talking about the same thing, those sorts of uncertainties don't provide much of a foundation for a hobby I'm afraid. Just look at all the anguish the Creed-heads go through. I can't imagine it's fun for them.

    Of course the public just buys what's there at the counter, so perhaps it won't make much of an impact on sales as far as the manufacturers are concerned, but it sews distrust and uncertainty, and puts the hobby on a shaky footing I think. Particularly for those who may be new to it.





Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000