Feeding the Monster: IFRA and the EU Parliament

    Feeding the Monster: IFRA and the EU Parliament

    post #1 of 8
    Thread Starter 

    http://tiny.cc/16o2yw

    post #2 of 8

    Thank you for posting this.

    post #3 of 8

    This is not new; the IFRA regulations concerning the matching of fragrances being taboo have been around for at least three years. In the opinion of most in the trade (of Perfumery) they are unworkable.

    post #4 of 8
    Yes, thanks for this.
    post #5 of 8
    Thanks, pluran.
    post #6 of 8

    As I understand, it's only a matter of weeks after a new frag has come out before the big companies have run the thing through their Gas Chromatography machines, to figure out what it's made of.

    This may not have any bearing on scent-matching, but it seems like a common practice.

    post #7 of 8
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Birdboy48View Post

    As I understand, it's only a matter of weeks after a new frag has come out before the big companies have run the thing through their Gas Chromatography machines, to figure out what it's made of.

    This may not have any bearing on scent-matching, but it seems like a common practice.

    It is common practice for a variety of reasons; only one of which is the direct copying of the fragrance. Many fragrance houses make a good living out of creating "knock offs", there is a thriving trade in certain parts of the world for these . But there is also the phenomenon called "the Trickle Down Effect", which requires knowing the formulation of a successful fragrance and then modifying it for use in other applications.

    post #8 of 8
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Birdboy48View Post

    As I understand, it's only a matter of weeks after a new frag has come out before the big companies have run the thing through their Gas Chromatography machines, to figure out what it's made of.

    This may not have any bearing on scent-matching, but it seems like a common practice.

    Definitely. It would be great to know all those formulas. :-)

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by David RuskinView Post

    It is common practice for a variety of reasons; only one of which is the direct copying of the fragrance. Many fragrance houses make a good living out of creating "knock offs", there is a thriving trade in certain parts of the world for these . But there is also the phenomenon called "the Trickle Down Effect", which requires knowing the formulation of a successful fragrance and then modifying it for use in other applications.

    Thanks, David Ruskin

    It reminds me of what Luca Turin wrote back in 2004. This is part of it:

    “A few years ago a committee was set up in France to look into the problem of plagiarism in fragrance. A jury composed of professionals and perfume lovers was to decide whether a given fragrance was a blatant copy of an existing one, and act as an expert witness in several juicy lawsuits. The idea foundered when it became clear that such a committee would probably reject some of the greatest fragrances ever made: Rive Gauche was an unsweetened Calandre , Dolce Vita the dusky sister of Féminité du Bois, Lolita Lempicka an ornate variation (the first of many) on Angel. In each case, however, the copy was arguably better than the original. Perfumery is still a classical art in which, as Charles Colton once put it, imitation is the sincerest flattery............

    ..........The fact is that perfumes, like species, usually evolve in incremental steps. When closely related, they can even interbreed to produce rare and splendid hybrids..........This is the matchmaker’s dream come true, a perfect heir to several princely houses of fragrance. Its lineage is second to none: in the beginning there was Diorella, the first fragrance to break free from the notion that flowers were wholesome, with an overripe note that urged one not to delay tasting the forbidden. Then it’s creator Edmond Roudnitska apparently took a contrary tack and worked with Jacques Polge on the pallid and haughty Cristalle, a floral form bathed in the cold light of a sculptor’s studio.........”

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    6/22/13 at 2:13am

    pluran said:



    http://tiny.cc/16o2yw

    6/22/13 at 2:54am

    lpp said:



    Thank you for posting this.

    6/22/13 at 5:24am

    David Ruskin said:



    This is not new; the IFRA regulations concerning the matching of fragrances being taboo have been around for at least three years. In the opinion of most in the trade (of Perfumery) they are unworkable.

    6/22/13 at 7:27am

    hednic said:



    Yes, thanks for this.

    6/22/13 at 7:52am

    mr. reasonable said:



    Thanks, pluran.

    6/22/13 at 9:28am

    Birdboy48 said:



    As I understand, it's only a matter of weeks after a new frag has come out before the big companies have run the thing through their Gas Chromatography machines, to figure out what it's made of.

    This may not have any bearing on scent-matching, but it seems like a common practice.

    6/23/13 at 1:35am

    David Ruskin said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Birdboy48View Post

    As I understand, it's only a matter of weeks after a new frag has come out before the big companies have run the thing through their Gas Chromatography machines, to figure out what it's made of.

    This may not have any bearing on scent-matching, but it seems like a common practice.

    It is common practice for a variety of reasons; only one of which is the direct copying of the fragrance. Many fragrance houses make a good living out of creating "knock offs", there is a thriving trade in certain parts of the world for these . But there is also the phenomenon called "the Trickle Down Effect", which requires knowing the formulation of a successful fragrance and then modifying it for use in other applications.

    6/23/13 at 2:38am

    pluran said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Birdboy48View Post

    As I understand, it's only a matter of weeks after a new frag has come out before the big companies have run the thing through their Gas Chromatography machines, to figure out what it's made of.

    This may not have any bearing on scent-matching, but it seems like a common practice.

    Definitely. It would be great to know all those formulas. :-)

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by David RuskinView Post

    It is common practice for a variety of reasons; only one of which is the direct copying of the fragrance. Many fragrance houses make a good living out of creating "knock offs", there is a thriving trade in certain parts of the world for these . But there is also the phenomenon called "the Trickle Down Effect", which requires knowing the formulation of a successful fragrance and then modifying it for use in other applications.

    Thanks, David Ruskin

    It reminds me of what Luca Turin wrote back in 2004. This is part of it:

    “A few years ago a committee was set up in France to look into the problem of plagiarism in fragrance. A jury composed of professionals and perfume lovers was to decide whether a given fragrance was a blatant copy of an existing one, and act as an expert witness in several juicy lawsuits. The idea foundered when it became clear that such a committee would probably reject some of the greatest fragrances ever made: Rive Gauche was an unsweetened Calandre , Dolce Vita the dusky sister of Féminité du Bois, Lolita Lempicka an ornate variation (the first of many) on Angel. In each case, however, the copy was arguably better than the original. Perfumery is still a classical art in which, as Charles Colton once put it, imitation is the sincerest flattery............

    ..........The fact is that perfumes, like species, usually evolve in incremental steps. When closely related, they can even interbreed to produce rare and splendid hybrids..........This is the matchmaker’s dream come true, a perfect heir to several princely houses of fragrance. Its lineage is second to none: in the beginning there was Diorella, the first fragrance to break free from the notion that flowers were wholesome, with an overripe note that urged one not to delay tasting the forbidden. Then it’s creator Edmond Roudnitska apparently took a contrary tack and worked with Jacques Polge on the pallid and haughty Cristalle, a floral form bathed in the cold light of a sculptor’s studio.........”