Cheap fragrances, headache, nausea, vomiting, why? Low quality Aromachemicals?

    Cheap fragrances, headache, nausea, vomiting, why? Low quality Aromachemicals?

    post #1 of 48
    Thread Starter 

    What is it about some fragrances that causes headaches and nausea? I actually vomited from the smell of a cheap perfume. The aromachemicals and essential oils in all perfumes are the same. I mean, the same essential oils  and aromachemicals found in the most expensive perfumes, can also be found in the cheapest perfumes. 

    Is that true?

     

    But, why is it that some of the cheapest perfumes cause such terrible symptoms, while the more expensive perfumes do not? Is it just that sometimes the cheaper perfumes have a very high concentration of a certain aromachemical that some people may be too sensitive to it?

     

     

    I am not talking about inhaling large amounts of perfume. Just being in the same room as someone wearing certain "cheap perfumes" is enough to trigger symptoms

    of headache, nausea, and vomiting. 

     

    Are there certain aromachemicals that are so cheap and low quality, that they should never be used in quality fragrances due to their ability to cause such problems as headache and nausea?
    post #2 of 48

     Either I liked a fragrance someone was wearing or I didn't. Fortunately, I haven't had any of those symptoms from a fragrance I didn't like. 

    post #3 of 48

    idk

    post #4 of 48
    I'll bet an expert from the DIY forum would have a concrete and technical answer for you. To me it just seems that people react differently to different chemicals. Perhaps it's the way certain companies blend them? Just a guess.
    post #5 of 48
    Thread Starter 

    Should I move this to the DIY forum? You may be right there may be be more answers there about this.

    post #6 of 48
    Perhaps it's a personal issue as it doesn't seem to be mentioned often?
    post #7 of 48

    Some blends work, others don't.   I have moved from one train carriage to another because I could not stand the smell of a fellow traveller's perfume.   Some smells can cause quite an extreme reaction.   I don't think it has anything to do with the quality or cost of a raw material, just the way they are blended together.

     

    How would you define cheap?   The actual cost of what is is a bottle of perfume doesn't vary by much, between the most expensive and the cheapest.

    post #8 of 48

    Luckily I've experienced such symptoms only when encountering the unwashed. I guess some perfumes, esp when overapplied and cloying, could cause an unwell feeling, depending on temperature, overall well-being, etc.

    post #9 of 48
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Russel View Post

    Luckily I've experienced such symptoms only when encountering the unwashed. I guess some perfumes, esp when overapplied and cloying, could cause an unwell feeling, depending on temperature, overall well-being, etc.

     

    True. Same with food or drink, can be nausea-inducing in excess.

    post #10 of 48

    you have bugatti veyron but you are not a smart driver

    the machine is very good at there where it is but if you are not enough to handle that 

    then this kind of ''1001'' HP beast is nothing but a bone snatcher for a naive.

    ''cheap'' and ''expensive'' is all about how you deal with what you have. where you are a ''perfumer'' of ''perfume lover''  :) 

    post #11 of 48

    I'm made nauseous by certain genres more than anything -- especially ones that rely on the same basic blends. Most "sporty" flanker-type fragrances, fragrances that open with on overly-chemical marine/grapefruit/lemon vibe, those "clean" scents (that smell anything but), and super-dry musks, all have a visceral effect on me akin to nails on a chalkboard. There's something shrill about many of them that just cuts right through me to the point where I have a difficult time being around them. The chemicals used in many are the same within the genre, so I generally keep my distance unless one gets inordinate praise, then I'll go check it out but approach with caution.

     

    I also have a similar issue with overly-sweet gourmand stuff -- in fact, most gourmand. But rather than getting a headache like I do from the ones mentioned above, they simply turn my stomach (although there are a few that I can handle). 

     

    You may have seen a recent thread(s) on synthetic vs. cloying -- that's generally my issue: the overly chemical smelling "sport" scents and the syrupy chocolatey gourmands. It's not cheap aroma chemicals per se, it's just the aesthetics and composition of a genre causes a negative response in me in the same way that certain foods might -- so it's more about personal taste than anything.

    post #12 of 48

    It's not what you do, it's the way that you do it.

    post #13 of 48

    a cheap fragrance that makes me puke literally... Musc Ravageur

    post #14 of 48
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by orloq View Post

    a cheap fragrance that makes me puke literally... Musc Ravageur

     

    Cheap?  Blimey - you must be loaded shocked.gif

    post #15 of 48
    Lucky I guess that I have never had a fragrance affect me adversely. I would hate to think that one I had spent a lot of money on what cause me discomfort.
    post #16 of 48
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hednic View Post

    Lucky I guess that I have never had a fragrance affect me adversely. I would hate to think that one I had spent a lot of money on what cause me discomfort.

    Me either I might not like something and maybe say "OMG that's bad" and wash it off at first opportunity but never had any nausea, headaches or adverse allergic reactions to anything

    post #17 of 48

    I'll take that back, some real heavy white florals make me sneeze sometimes but only a few times until the full blast of them tones down

    post #18 of 48

    There were way too many copycat frags, thos 1990's Men's Sports fragrances, that all had the same base, and they ALL gave me a headache.

     

    Fresh Hyacinth flowers, Paper white Hyacinth, Stargazer lillies, all types of Jasmine flowers, Tulips, Daffodils, they all give me raging headaches.

     

    I had to stop wearing Terre de'Hermes, because it gave me headaches.

     

    All those stupid Men's Sports fragrances were one of the primary reasons I started into Perfumery, which was to make my own scents that didn't give me a headache...  That, and that I CAN'T STAND VANILLA, which seems to be mindnumbingly pervasive.  So ruling out vanilclass="

    7/1/13 at 3:24pm

    kamas said:



    What is it about some fragrances that causes headaches and nausea? I actually vomited from the smell of a cheap perfume. The aromachemicals and essential oils in all perfumes are the same. I mean, the same essential oils  and aromachemicals found in the most expensive perfumes, can also be found in the cheapest perfumes. 

    Is that true?

     

    But, why is it that some of the cheapest perfumes cause such terrible symptoms, while the more expensive perfumes do not? Is it just that sometimes the cheaper perfumes have a very high concentration of a certain aromachemical that some people may be too sensitive to it?

     

     

    I am not talking about inhaling large amounts of perfume. Just being in the same room as someone wearing certain "cheap perfumes" is enough to trigger symptoms

    of headache, nausea, and vomiting. 

     

    Are there certain aromachemicals that are so cheap and low quality, that they should never be used in quality fragrances due to their ability to cause such problems as headache and nausea?

    7/1/13 at 3:33pm

    sjg3839 said:



     Either I liked a fragrance someone was wearing or I didn't. Fortunately, I haven't had any of those symptoms from a fragrance I didn't like. 

    7/1/13 at 5:33pm

    Tony T said:



    idk

    7/1/13 at 6:07pm

    hednic said:



    I'll bet an expert from the DIY forum would have a concrete and technical answer for you. To me it just seems that people react differently to different chemicals. Perhaps it's the way certain companies blend them? Just a guess.

    7/1/13 at 9:39pm

    kamas said:



    Should I move this to the DIY forum? You may be right there may be be more answers there about this.

    7/2/13 at 1:10am

    lpp said:



    Perhaps it's a personal issue as it doesn't seem to be mentioned often?

    7/2/13 at 1:37am

    David Ruskin said:



    Some blends work, others don't.   I have moved from one train carriage to another because I could not stand the smell of a fellow traveller's perfume.   Some smells can cause quite an extreme reaction.   I don't think it has anything to do with the quality or cost of a raw material, just the way they are blended together.

     

    How would you define cheap?   The actual cost of what is is a bottle of perfume doesn't vary by much, between the most expensive and the cheapest.

    7/2/13 at 2:56am

    Russel said:



    Luckily I've experienced such symptoms only when encountering the unwashed. I guess some perfumes, esp when overapplied and cloying, could cause an unwell feeling, depending on temperature, overall well-being, etc.

    7/2/13 at 3:45am

    Ken Cosgrove said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Russel View Post

    Luckily I've experienced such symptoms only when encountering the unwashed. I guess some perfumes, esp when overapplied and cloying, could cause an unwell feeling, depending on temperature, overall well-being, etc.

     

    True. Same with food or drink, can be nausea-inducing in excess.

    7/2/13 at 10:34pm

    Tallat said:



    you have bugatti veyron but you are not a smart driver

    the machine is very good at there where it is but if you are not enough to handle that 

    then this kind of ''1001'' HP beast is nothing but a bone snatcher for a naive.

    ''cheap'' and ''expensive'' is all about how you deal with what you have. where you are a ''perfumer'' of ''perfume lover''  :) 

    7/2/13 at 11:04pm

    deadidol said:



    I'm made nauseous by certain genres more than anything -- especially ones that rely on the same basic blends. Most "sporty" flanker-type fragrances, fragrances that open with on overly-chemical marine/grapefruit/lemon vibe, those "clean" scents (that smell anything but), and super-dry musks, all have a visceral effect on me akin to nails on a chalkboard. There's something shrill about many of them that just cuts right through me to the point where I have a difficult time being around them. The chemicals used in many are the same within the genre, so I generally keep my distance unless one gets inordinate praise, then I'll go check it out but approach with caution.

     

    I also have a similar issue with overly-sweet gourmand stuff -- in fact, most gourmand. But rather than getting a headache like I do from the ones mentioned above, they simply turn my stomach (although there are a few that I can handle). 

     

    You may have seen a recent thread(s) on synthetic vs. cloying -- that's generally my issue: the overly chemical smelling "sport" scents and the syrupy chocolatey gourmands. It's not cheap aroma chemicals per se, it's just the aesthetics and composition of a genre causes a negative response in me in the same way that certain foods might -- so it's more about personal taste than anything.

    7/3/13 at 1:37am

    David Ruskin said:



    It's not what you do, it's the way that you do it.

    7/3/13 at 6:20am

    orloq said:



    a cheap fragrance that makes me puke literally... Musc Ravageur

    7/3/13 at 6:34am

    Kaern said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by orloq View Post

    a cheap fragrance that makes me puke literally... Musc Ravageur

     

    Cheap?  Blimey - you must be loaded shocked.gif

    7/3/13 at 11:16am

    hednic said:



    Lucky I guess that I have never had a fragrance affect me adversely. I would hate to think that one I had spent a lot of money on what cause me discomfort.

    7/3/13 at 2:04pm

    Katana said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hednic View Post

    Lucky I guess that I have never had a fragrance affect me adversely. I would hate to think that one I had spent a lot of money on what cause me discomfort.

    Me either I might not like something and maybe say "OMG that's bad" and wash it off at first opportunity but never had any nausea, headaches or adverse allergic reactions to anything

    7/3/13 at 2:06pm

    Katana said:



    I'll take that back, some real heavy white florals make me sneeze sometimes but only a few times until the full blast of them tones down

    8/14/13 at 9:56pm

    pkiler said:



    There were way too many copycat frags, thos 1990's Men's Sports fragrances, that all had the same base, and they ALL gave me a headache.

     

    Fresh Hyacinth flowers, Paper white Hyacinth, Stargazer lillies, all types of Jasmine flowers, Tulips, Daffodils, they all give me raging headaches.

     

    I had to stop wearing Terre de'Hermes, because it gave me headaches.

     

    All those stupid Men's Sports fragrances were one of the primary reasons I started into Perfumery, which was to make my own scents that didn't give me a headache...  That, and that I CAN'T STAND VANILLA, which seems to be mindnumbingly pervasive.  So ruling out vanilclass="