IFRA PERFUME REGULATIONS ABOUT MATERIALS AND THEIR EFFECT ON SMELL

    IFRA PERFUME REGULATIONS ABOUT MATERIALS AND THEIR EFFECT ON SMELL

    post #1 of 11
    Thread Starter 

    I am aware that these last decades there have been some regulations about the change in usage of some ingredients and replacement by others by the perfume organisation.


    1)Can you tell me these last 20 years,how many times thesre regulations were put out and you were forced to change the ingredients?

    2)Do companies find the 100% correct alternatives so that the smell not to be affected?

     

    thanks

    post #2 of 11

    Read the stickie on IFRA, there is a lot of useful information there.

     

    In answer to question Number 2.   Every time a change is made in the formulation, the resulting perfume will be different.   Sometimes the change is very small, other times it will be very noticeable.   It depends on how easy it is to replace a particular smell.   Oakmoss, for example, is impossible to replace and so any fragrance depending on Oakmoss is going to be very different, as we have already seen.

    post #3 of 11
    Thread Starter 

    do you know if the following materials were forced to be replaced?

     

     

    -peony

    -chamomile

    -cedarwood

    -geranium leaves

    post #4 of 11
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pistola View Post

    do you know if the following materials were forced to be replaced?

     

     

    -peony

    -chamomile

    -cedarwood

    -geranium leaves

    Look on the IFRA web site or the stickie about IFRA and find out.   As far as I am aware there is no Peony extract that is used in Perfumery.

    post #5 of 11

    I am not aware of oakmoss being banned but rather the recommended percentage being changed. I also heard that the chemical lobby groups are trying to impose the use of the synthetic version called Evernys on the grounds that it's safer. I thought that the oakmoss with the atranol removed was already proved to be safe.

     

    I work with a specialist in cosmetic regulation in the UK and to this day they and the chemistry experts cannot reply to what is exactly going to change as the information communicated is not clear at all.

     

    Someone can enlighten?

    post #6 of 11

    You can still use oakmoss, but you can't really make traditional chypre perfumes, which are based on oakmoss, because the percentage is traditionally too high. You can have an oakmoss note, but you can't really have an oakmoss perfume, like a traditional chypre. The whole point of a chypre is oakmoss.

     

    Not any more. Therein lies the rub. You have to use the synthetic.
     

    post #7 of 11
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Parfumsisabelle View Post
    what is exactly going to change as the information communicated is not clear at all.

    You're not actually asking for clarity and reason, are you?

     

    :-)

    post #8 of 11

    Of course not:) All I understand from this mumbo-jumbo is that it means more money to fork out for the perfumes to make their way onto the market... 

    post #9 of 11

    Indeed Oakmoss has not been banned but as DST explained its use has been reduced to such a low level as to render traditional Chypres (such as Mitsouko and Miss Dior) impossible.   Evernyl has been around for ages as a cheaper alternative; it has never been used as a replacement.   The latest IFRA regulations spell the end of traditional Chypres and possible Fougeres.

     

    I quite agree about the complexity of the information.  Have you seen the newly designed IFRA site?   One of the ugliest sites I have been on, and I can almost believe it has been made as difficult to navigate as is possible to put everyone off using it.

    post #10 of 11

    to quote myself from my recent profile posted to CaFleureBon:

     

    "On American Perumery: I am an American, not French.  I am not trying to be French, just working on being myself.  America and American Perfumery can certainly stand on its own two feet.  And I certainly don’t want a ridiculous tyrannical foreign body like IFRA telling me what Perfumery is.  IFRA is destroying Real Perfumery.  IFRA is Evil.  Most all perfumers feel the same, but many face getting fired if they speak up publicly about this travesty.  I am my own boss, and so can make Real Perfumes and not get fired. Independent Artisanal American Perfumery is presently still free to be THE MOST BEAUTIFUL perfumery on the planet.  That’s what I try to make…   I hope that I succeed, and that I can retain my freedom to make Beauty and Grace manifest in perfumes."

    post #11 of 11

    Calm down Paul, it's only a smell.

     

    I'm not sure that IFRA is evil,  I think it was originally well intentioned; just got lost along the way.   There is a basis of truth in what it does which applies even in "Merca. 

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    7/5/13 at 1:24pm

    pistola said:



    I am aware that these last decades there have been some regulations about the change in usage of some ingredients and replacement by others by the perfume organisation.


    1)Can you tell me these last 20 years,how many times thesre regulations were put out and you were forced to change the ingredients?

    2)Do companies find the 100% correct alternatives so that the smell not to be affected?

     

    thanks

    7/6/13 at 1:30am

    David Ruskin said:



    Read the stickie on IFRA, there is a lot of useful information there.

     

    In answer to question Number 2.   Every time a change is made in the formulation, the resulting perfume will be different.   Sometimes the change is very small, other times it will be very noticeable.   It depends on how easy it is to replace a particular smell.   Oakmoss, for example, is impossible to replace and so any fragrance depending on Oakmoss is going to be very different, as we have already seen.

    7/6/13 at 3:57am

    pistola said:



    do you know if the following materials were forced to be replaced?

     

     

    -peony

    -chamomile

    -cedarwood

    -geranium leaves

    7/6/13 at 5:22am

    David Ruskin said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pistola View Post

    do you know if the following materials were forced to be replaced?

     

     

    -peony

    -chamomile

    -cedarwood

    -geranium leaves

    Look on the IFRA web site or the stickie about IFRA and find out.   As far as I am aware there is no Peony extract that is used in Perfumery.

    7/6/13 at 10:58am

    Parfumsisabelle said:



    I am not aware of oakmoss being banned but rather the recommended percentage being changed. I also heard that the chemical lobby groups are trying to impose the use of the synthetic version called Evernys on the grounds that it's safer. I thought that the oakmoss with the atranol removed was already proved to be safe.

     

    I work with a specialist in cosmetic regulation in the UK and to this day they and the chemistry experts cannot reply to what is exactly going to change as the information communicated is not clear at all.

     

    Someone can enlighten?

    7/7/13 at 3:16am

    DrSmellThis said:



    You can still use oakmoss, but you can't really make traditional chypre perfumes, which are based on oakmoss, because the percentage is traditionally too high. You can have an oakmoss note, but you can't really have an oakmoss perfume, like a traditional chypre. The whole point of a chypre is oakmoss.

     

    Not any more. Therein lies the rub. You have to use the synthetic.
     

    9/7/13 at 11:00pm

    pkiler said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Parfumsisabelle View Post
    what is exactly going to change as the information communicated is not clear at all.

    You're not actually asking for clarity and reason, are you?

     

    :-)

    9/7/13 at 11:58pm

    Parfumsisabelle said:



    Of course not:) All I understand from this mumbo-jumbo is that it means more money to fork out for the perfumes to make their way onto the market... 

    9/8/13 at 5:05am

    David Ruskin said:



    Indeed Oakmoss has not been banned but as DST explained its use has been reduced to such a low level as to render traditional Chypres (such as Mitsouko and Miss Dior) impossible.   Evernyl has been around for ages as a cheaper alternative; it has never been used as a replacement.   The latest IFRA regulations spell the end of traditional Chypres and possible Fougeres.

     

    I quite agree about the complexity of the information.  Have you seen the newly designed IFRA site?   One of the ugliest sites I have been on, and I can almost believe it has been made as difficult to navigate as is possible to put everyone off using it.

    9/8/13 at 8:42am

    pkiler said:



    to quote myself from my recent profile posted to CaFleureBon:

     

    "On American Perumery: I am an American, not French.  I am not trying to be French, just working on being myself.  America and American Perfumery can certainly stand on its own two feet.  And I certainly don’t want a ridiculous tyrannical foreign body like IFRA telling me what Perfumery is.  IFRA is destroying Real Perfumery.  IFRA is Evil.  Most all perfumers feel the same, but many face getting fired if they speak up publicly about this travesty.  I am my own boss, and so can make Real Perfumes and not get fired. Independent Artisanal American Perfumery is presently still free to be THE MOST BEAUTIFUL perfumery on the planet.  That’s what I try to make…   I hope that I succeed, and that I can retain my freedom to make Beauty and Grace manifest in perfumes."

    9/8/13 at 11:31am

    David Ruskin said:



    Calm down Paul, it's only a smell.

     

    I'm not sure that IFRA is evil,  I think it was originally well intentioned; just got lost along the way.   There is a basis of truth in what it does which applies even in "Merca. 





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