Is it just me or are scents today one noted?

    Is it just me or are scents today one noted?

    post #1 of 23
    Thread Starter 

    Maybe my nose just really sucks, maybe that's the case, and my collection is not that extense so far, but most of the perfumes I wear I just sense one smell throughout and most of them are gone in less than an hour.

    The only perfumes were I have felt different stages, they smell one way in the beginning, and another throughout are Chanel Number 5, Madonna's Truth Or Dare and Fracas. The others I really can't distinguish much, I feel colorblind =(cry.gif

    post #2 of 23
    I would do a little more exploring and trying more scents. There is a vast array of fragrances out there. You're bound to find still others which you can detect different stages of development.
    post #3 of 23
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hednicView Post

    I would do a little more exploring and trying more scents. There is a vast array of fragrances out there. You're bound to find still others which you can detect different stages of development.

    Well I have many more that I want to try, but I still feel like I can't sense anything

    post #4 of 23

    The demise of oakmoss, animalic musks, and sandalwood, the traditional drydown materials, certainly doesn't help. And my skin is very dry and I tend to have longevity issues too.

    I think the concept of a three stage pyramid is exagerated. It clearly doesn't describe most of the current stuff. But even for old stuff, it usually doesn't mean three completely different smells. Distinct, but related, phases are noticeable perhaps only in vintage old classics: citrus or aldehydic top, sometimes lasting literally minutes, followed by a heart (say floral), finally morphing into a drydown (whether chypre or sandalwood or what else). Of course now oakmoss is restricted and sandalwood unavailable.

    cacio

    post #5 of 23
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cacioView Post

    The demise of oakmoss, animalic musks, and sandalwood, the traditional drydown materials, certainly doesn't help. And my skin is very dry and I tend to have longevity issues too.

    I think the concept of a three stage pyramid is exagerated. It clearly doesn't describe most of the current stuff. But even for old stuff, it usually doesn't mean three completely different smells. Distinct, but related, phases are noticeable perhaps only in vintage old classics: citrus or aldehydic top, sometimes lasting literally minutes, followed by a heart (say floral), finally morphing into a drydown (whether chypre or sandalwood or what else). Of course now oakmoss is restricted and sandalwood unavailable.

    cacio


    That is a very good point. I made a thread about brands or perfumes in particular that one just has to know, like what it's done in literature, where there are some books you just have to read, and I only got bitchiness and rudeness from everyone, so I'll try again, can you give me the lowdown on the perfumes I just have to try? the ones which are most complex?

    And the journey you describe I've clearly felt it with Fracas for instance

    post #6 of 23
    Thread Starter 

    Why is sandalwood restricted?

    post #7 of 23

    The more you explore and the more you learn of the individual notes (by smelling the actual chemicals or essential oils/absolutes in isolation, ideally!) the more variety you'll find in scents. I remember back in the day I literally believed most aquatics smelled the same, and it's because i didn't have the mental constructs in place to actually properly evaluate the differences. Now I have to laugh when someone says something like "D&G Light Blue PH smells JUST like AdG!"

    One scent I've test recently where the evolution is masterful and almost every note can be smelled, clearly, at some stage of the evolution is Kilian's Incense Oud. The start is clearly grapefruit and cardamom flanked by a somewhat soapy geranium, this transitions to an oud/rose heart and then the incense starts to rise. Later, the soft and slightly smoky oakmoss is clear as day in the base.

    post #8 of 23
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SculptureOfSoulView Post

    The more you explore and the more you learn of the individual notes (by smelling the actual chemicals or essential oils/absolutes in isolation, ideally!) the more variety you'll find in scents. I remember back in the day I literally believed most aquatics smelled the same, and it's because i didn't have the mental constructs in place to actually properly evaluate the differences. Now I have to laugh when someone says something like "D&G Light Blue PH smells JUST like AdG!"

    One scent I've test recently where the evolution is masterful and almost every note can be smelled, clearly, at some stage of the evolution is Kilian's Incense Oud. The start is clearly grapefruit and cardamom flanked by a somewhat soapy geranium, this transitions to an oud/rose heart and then the incense starts to rise. Later, the soft and slightly smoky oakmoss is clear as day in the base.

    I'll have to try that one

    post #9 of 23

    As one who had similar impressions about many "modern" fragrances, I personally was able to appreciate the scent pyramid pretty clearly on most of the Parfums de Marly line. There's no reason for me to think your nose is identical to mine, but it might be a place to start - particularly since there's a fairly large offering from that house.

    post #10 of 23

    Sandalwood isn't restricted. Indian Sandalwood is almost impossible to find now.

    In answer to your question; it's you.

    post #11 of 23

    I'm thinking maybe you heard something about the evolution of perfume composition and then jumped to a premature conclusion about perfumes when smelling them. Smell more with an open mind, and you will discover a lot more going on. It takes a little bit of time for your nose to grow, but not like Pinnochio. :)

    What is true of modern perfumes are two things related to your comments, having to do with a relatively greater reliance on synthetics (they've been in use for all of modern pefumery), and the relative reduction (not elimenation) of the percentage of natural materials.

    One, it is somewhat more common, and somewhat has been popular, to make perfumes with a more "horizontal" minset, having a single scent theme (not so often a single note) that lasts for much of a perfume's life. The defining characteristic of such perfumes is that the ingredients have similar evaporation patterns, so that you most always smell most everything. I'm no authority on what perfumes are currently popular, though.

    To complete that thought, a more "vertical" mindset would look at a narrow smell theme, or a "single smell" with top, mid and base characteristics. That view allows you to trace a smell like an unfolding story. A balanced approach is to compose perfume with a balance of a vertical/horizontal outlook. When I plan a perfume, I plan it both ways, which is probably just obsessive-compulsiveness.

    A second characteristiic of modern perfumes relates to the greater availability and/or greater number of quality materials, making it easier to use aromachemicals that last as well as having top and or mid characteristics. What that means is if there is an aspect of a perfume you want to last a certain time, there are often options for getting you there, as compared to before in history.

    An essential oil or natural substance is a mixture of chemicals with different evaporation patterns already, so it's just harder to have a horizontal perfume. For example, one might suppose of bay rum as a one note, horizontal perfume, since it's typically composed mostly of bay. But really, smearing just bay on yourself does involve an unfolding story, since it's an essential oil. Same with all other natural materials, or most. (I suppose rosewood has more horizontal characteristics due to the linalool, and clove is another example,depending on the variety.). It's easier to find synthetic materials that just are what they are, and it's easier to find more materials period these days, thousands of them.

    post #12 of 23

    Regarding the must smell, the Osmotheque uses the lineup I have described in a thread during their smelling sessions:

    http://www.basenotes.net/t/364803/osmotheque-visit-and-samples

    Unfortunately, most are discontinued or reformulated, so one pretty much has to go to the osmotheque. Among the few classics in reasonable state, I think one can look into some Guerlains (Mitsouko, despite the oakmoss, Jicky, Shalimar-which as an oriental doesn't have a progression, though), Chanel (Cuir de Russie, Bois des Isles, Cristalle, No 19), some Piguet (Bandit, Futur, Baghari), and the occasional Caron extrait that hasn't been defaced (En Avion, Acaciosa, a few others). I'm not sure any classic Dior still exists.

    cacio

    post #13 of 23
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by David RuskinView Post

    Sandalwood isn't restricted. Indian Sandalwood is almost impossible to find now.

    In answer to your question; it's you.


    Yeah how would you know

    post #14 of 23
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DrSmellThisView Post

    I'm thinking maybe you heard something about the evolution of perfume composition and then jumped to a premature conclusion about perfumes when smelling them. Smell more with an open mind, and you will discover a lot more going on. It takes a little bit of time for your nose to grow, but not like Pinnochio. :)

    What is true of modern perfumes are two things related to your comments, having to do with a relatively greater reliance on synthetics (they've been in use for all of modern pefumery), and the relative reduction (not elimenation) of the percentage of natural materials.

    One, it is somewhat more common, and somewhat has been popular, to make perfumes with a more "horizontal" minset, having a single scent theme (not so often a single note) that lasts for much of a perfume's life. The defining characteristic of such perfumes is that the ingredients have similar evaporation patterns, so that you most always smell most everything. I'm no authority on what perfumes are currently popular, though.

    To complete that thought, a more "vertical" mindset would look at a narrow smell theme, or a "single smell" with top, mid and base characteristics. That view allows you to trace a smell like an unfolding story. A balanced approach is to compose perfume with a balance of a vertical/horizontal outlook. When I plan a perfume, I plan it both ways, which is probably just obsessive-compulsiveness.

    A second characteristiic of modern perfumes relates to the greater availability and/or greater number of quality materials, making it easier to use aromachemicals that last as well as having top and or mid characteristics. What that means is if there is an aspect of a perfume you want to last a certain time, there are often options for getting you there, as compared to before in history.

    An essential oil or natural substance is a mixture of chemicals with different evaporation patterns already, so it's just harder to have a horizontal perfume. For example, one might suppose of bay rum as a one note, horizontal perfume, since it's typically composed mostly of bay. But really, smearing just bay on yourself does involve an unfolding story, since it's an essential oil. Same with all other natural materials, or most. (I suppose rosewood has more horizontal characteristics due to the linalool, and clove is another example,depending on the variety.). It's easier to find synthetic materials that just are what they are, and it's easier to find more materials period these days, thousands of them.


    That's what Luca Turin said, that most perfumes today just put all the notes together in the first sniff, to ensure people buy them more quickly I guess

    post #15 of 23

    Blohan - if you wish to check out the Single Note area in respect of Sandalwood, I posted a link earlier to a very informative website which will provide further reading.

    post #16 of 23




Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000