Oak Moss 65% TEC

    Oak Moss 65% TEC

    post #1 of 11
    Thread Starter 

    What does the 65% refer to? What is "TEC"?

    post #2 of 11

    I'm guessing that it is a 65.0% solution of Oakmoss in TEC.   TEC is TriEthyl Citrate, an odourless solvent.

    post #3 of 11
    Thread Starter 

    That's what I'm guessing as well, but the ambiguity for me is whether it's the oak moss absolute or the TEC that's 65% of the solution.

     

    Edit: Called a vendor who sells it. 65% oak moss.

    post #4 of 11

    Oakmoss absolute is a very hard substance which is difficult to use.   It is often softened by adding a small amount of a solvent.   I guess the 65.0% Oakmoss you mention as been diluted with TEC achieve this.   65.0% Oakmoss, 35.0% TEC.  

    post #5 of 11
    Thread Starter 
    I figured as much as to why it was diluted. I just needed to know which was at which concentration so I can do the math properly when I dilute it to 10% oak moss in solvent.
    post #6 of 11

    You're welcome.

    post #7 of 11

    Can I just jump onto this with a further question (that I think I know the answer to already)? So if I have a material that's 50% TEC (oakwood, in this case), should that be consideration for further dilution in blending, or should I simply treat the material like I would any other and dilute as my nose sees fit? Even at 50% it's quite goopy). 

    post #8 of 11

    Various solvents are added to those substances which are very hard, or very viscous to help in compounding.   Oakmoss, Treemoss and Benzoin are all let down with various solvents.   The most common are Benzyl Benzoate, Iso Propyl Myristate and Triethyl Citrate.   If you think your Oakwood 50.0% is still too viscous, or too strong then dilute away.   As you are keeping notes, you know what you have done, and you know what the final concentration of your diluted solution is; don't you? 

    post #9 of 11
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by David Ruskin View Post
    As you are keeping notes, you know what you have done, and you know what the final concentration of your diluted solution is; don't you? 

    In theory, yes. I actually haven't tried working with this one yet (I'm not sure what I'd do with it yet). I'll play around and see what happens.

    post #10 of 11
    Thread Starter 
    I say dilute it further especially when you are testing new blends out, as it gives a closer approximation of how the scent opens up in a finished blend and it saves the raw stuff from being wasted. Testing blends at 10% is less costly than at 50%. Plus, it's still "goopy", and that's a pain to work with.
    post #11 of 11

    Thanks for the tips, all. I'm going to approach this one with caution as it is a pricey material.

     

    I might try wearing a small amount of it neat (20%?) for a while to get a better feel of it.

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    7/16/13 at 1:53am

    nefastvs said:



    What does the 65% refer to? What is "TEC"?

    7/16/13 at 2:36am

    David Ruskin said:



    I'm guessing that it is a 65.0% solution of Oakmoss in TEC.   TEC is TriEthyl Citrate, an odourless solvent.

    7/16/13 at 10:42am

    nefastvs said:



    That's what I'm guessing as well, but the ambiguity for me is whether it's the oak moss absolute or the TEC that's 65% of the solution.

     

    Edit: Called a vendor who sells it. 65% oak moss.

    7/16/13 at 10:59am

    David Ruskin said:



    Oakmoss absolute is a very hard substance which is difficult to use.   It is often softened by adding a small amount of a solvent.   I guess the 65.0% Oakmoss you mention as been diluted with TEC achieve this.   65.0% Oakmoss, 35.0% TEC.  

    7/16/13 at 11:05am

    nefastvs said:



    I figured as much as to why it was diluted. I just needed to know which was at which concentration so I can do the math properly when I dilute it to 10% oak moss in solvent.

    7/16/13 at 11:50am

    David Ruskin said:



    You're welcome.

    7/17/13 at 11:49am

    deadidol said:



    Can I just jump onto this with a further question (that I think I know the answer to already)? So if I have a material that's 50% TEC (oakwood, in this case), should that be consideration for further dilution in blending, or should I simply treat the material like I would any other and dilute as my nose sees fit? Even at 50% it's quite goopy). 

    7/17/13 at 12:02pm

    David Ruskin said:



    Various solvents are added to those substances which are very hard, or very viscous to help in compounding.   Oakmoss, Treemoss and Benzoin are all let down with various solvents.   The most common are Benzyl Benzoate, Iso Propyl Myristate and Triethyl Citrate.   If you think your Oakwood 50.0% is still too viscous, or too strong then dilute away.   As you are keeping notes, you know what you have done, and you know what the final concentration of your diluted solution is; don't you? 

    7/17/13 at 12:05pm

    deadidol said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by David Ruskin View Post
    As you are keeping notes, you know what you have done, and you know what the final concentration of your diluted solution is; don't you? 

    In theory, yes. I actually haven't tried working with this one yet (I'm not sure what I'd do with it yet). I'll play around and see what happens.

    7/17/13 at 12:12pm

    nefastvs said:



    I say dilute it further especially when you are testing new blends out, as it gives a closer approximation of how the scent opens up in a finished blend and it saves the raw stuff from being wasted. Testing blends at 10% is less costly than at 50%. Plus, it's still "goopy", and that's a pain to work with.

    7/17/13 at 12:17pm

    deadidol said:



    Thanks for the tips, all. I'm going to approach this one with caution as it is a pricey material.

     

    I might try wearing a small amount of it neat (20%?) for a while to get a better feel of it.