"Perfumerbook"

    "Perfumerbook"

    post #1 of 5
    Thread Starter 

    What's your opinion about Glen O. Brechbill's books?

    I had a look on his site "perfumerbook.com" , there's plenty of perfumery books -hundreds of pages- for free.

    Very unusual.

    post #2 of 5
    It is unusual that someone would release an immense document like that for free. I think it is rather sketchy, but perhaps I'm being overly cynical.
    post #3 of 5
    Thanks for the post. Very interesting stuff. I don't agree with the whole "everything has to natural" people, it's very unsustainable. I can't remember who it was but he said "synthetics are the bones and naturals the flesh of a fragrance", or something to that degree.
    post #4 of 5
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by elevationView Post

    I don't agree with the whole "everything has to natural" people,

    according to them, we should eliminate Chanel nr.5 since it contained the "new" chemical nitro ( = explosive) musks.grin.gif

    post #5 of 5

    I recently found these documents, and I think they are extremely interesting. Brechbill offers a mix of factual, practical information about fragrance ingredients and their aroma profiles, plus some useful formulas to try if you have the components.

    He also relates his personal story, which is ends unfortunately with his being fired, which he believes is related to a scam in which two companies stole trade secrets from another company. (I hope I have explained his story accurately in my attempt to be concise.)

    I give him credit for being generous with information that might allow new perfumers to embark on a course of self-education. Aspiring perfumers still would need to purchase a large number of aroma chemicals and natural materials, and there are so many listed that it would be hard to decide which to buy. Also, some of the companies that produce them would probably only deal with wholesale buyers.

    Although it would be a huge endeavor, this information might offer a starting point for those who can't or don't want to enroll in perfumery school and feel comfortable experimenting on their own.

    The amount of work he put into publishing this huge reference online indicates that he believes in freedom of information. I think a person could learn a lot from Mr. Brechbill.

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    7/18/13 at 7:00pm

    Andre Moreau said:



    What's your opinion about Glen O. Brechbill's books?

    I had a look on his site "perfumerbook.com" , there's plenty of perfumery books -hundreds of pages- for free.

    Very unusual.

    7/20/13 at 5:05pm

    Curly11 said:



    It is unusual that someone would release an immense document like that for free. I think it is rather sketchy, but perhaps I'm being overly cynical.

    7/21/13 at 3:50pm

    elevation said:



    Thanks for the post. Very interesting stuff. I don't agree with the whole "everything has to natural" people, it's very unsustainable. I can't remember who it was but he said "synthetics are the bones and naturals the flesh of a fragrance", or something to that degree.

    7/22/13 at 12:03pm

    Andre Moreau said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by elevationView Post

    I don't agree with the whole "everything has to natural" people,

    according to them, we should eliminate Chanel nr.5 since it contained the "new" chemical nitro ( = explosive) musks.grin.gif

    7/26/13 at 5:36pm

    purplebird7 said:



    I recently found these documents, and I think they are extremely interesting. Brechbill offers a mix of factual, practical information about fragrance ingredients and their aroma profiles, plus some useful formulas to try if you have the components.

    He also relates his personal story, which is ends unfortunately with his being fired, which he believes is related to a scam in which two companies stole trade secrets from another company. (I hope I have explained his story accurately in my attempt to be concise.)

    I give him credit for being generous with information that might allow new perfumers to embark on a course of self-education. Aspiring perfumers still would need to purchase a large number of aroma chemicals and natural materials, and there are so many listed that it would be hard to decide which to buy. Also, some of the companies that produce them would probably only deal with wholesale buyers.

    Although it would be a huge endeavor, this information might offer a starting point for those who can't or don't want to enroll in perfumery school and feel comfortable experimenting on their own.

    The amount of work he put into publishing this huge reference online indicates that he believes in freedom of information. I think a person could learn a lot from Mr. Brechbill.





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