How can i create male fragrance, based on those oils?

    How can i create male fragrance, based on those oils?

    post #1 of 5
    Thread Starter 

    I have following essential oils, they are 100% natural, were expensive:

    Cedarwood

    Grapefruit
    Bergamot
    Clary Sage
    Ylang
    Rosemary
    Patchouli
    Cinnamon
    Lavender
    Cypress
    And Sweet almond oil and jojoba oil.
    I would like to take few of this oils and create something deep, strongly male, arousal, sexual and long lasting? (to attract women)
    post #2 of 5

    Which cedarwood oil do you have? For a very masculine fragrance you'll want to go fairly heavy on the base notes (cedarwood, patchouli etc) and middle notes (sage, cinnamon etc). Although the top notes are still important and will need to be used in good measure if they aren't to become drowned out.


    Edited by Pears - 7/22/13 at 8:08am
    post #3 of 5
    Thread Starter 

    Cedrus Atlantica Oil

    post #4 of 5

    If they were expensive, then you were ripped off.

    post #5 of 5

    Tough to do with those alone. I'd probably try ylang, with a dash of cinnamon, patchouli and a bergamot top, but not optimistic about that as a complete perfume. It would be in the direction of a perfume but not balanced. Your basenotes are lacking, for one thing, and the ingredients are not sufficient to avoid a thin, harsh effect.

    I'd also dilute to 10% and at least learn to optimise a lavender-clary accord as a useful exercise. You could use that knowledge then to, again, start going in the direction of a perfume. Other important exercises would be making cypress/lavender, and lavender/bergamot accords. Those top note exercises can then be combined. But you lack basenotes to make important accords.

    A lot of posters recently seem to want instant brilliant miracles from nothing with little effort/expense/time, and have not yet learned appropriate respect for the art. It's awkward then to advise properly.

    Virginia cedar has some sexy, perfumey characteristics, and no reason you can't wear a little. But again, that's not close to a perfume.

    Patchouli can be extremely sexy in the context of a perfume, especially if the oil is aged well; but you are lacking the ingredients to easily make that happen. But experiment with a patchouli-ylang accord, as a learning exercise. Both are very sexy oils. But as a duo I'd say it is incomplete. Both have a harsh edge. Same with patchouli-cedar, although certainly trying to make an accord between the two would be informative.

    The most important accords are between things with similar evaoporation profiles, and complimentary attributes, and you lack options here. For example, patchouli-musk is a basic chypre accord

    You have enough to start learning with. How's that? Then you need to read and learn more first. Then you will have to buy other ingredients.


    Edited by DrSmellThis - 7/23/13 at 12:55pm
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    7/21/13 at 10:58pm

    zanakan said:



    I have following essential oils, they are 100% natural, were expensive:

    Cedarwood

    Grapefruit
    Bergamot
    Clary Sage
    Ylang
    Rosemary
    Patchouli
    Cinnamon
    Lavender
    Cypress
    And Sweet almond oil and jojoba oil.
    I would like to take few of this oils and create something deep, strongly male, arousal, sexual and long lasting? (to attract women)

    7/22/13 at 7:16am

    Pears said:



    Which cedarwood oil do you have? For a very masculine fragrance you'll want to go fairly heavy on the base notes (cedarwood, patchouli etc) and middle notes (sage, cinnamon etc). Although the top notes are still important and will need to be used in good measure if they aren't to become drowned out.


    Edited by Pears - 7/22/13 at 8:08am

    7/22/13 at 8:07am

    zanakan said:



    Cedrus Atlantica Oil

    7/22/13 at 11:51pm

    pkiler said:



    If they were expensive, then you were ripped off.

    7/23/13 at 11:50am

    DrSmellThis said:



    Tough to do with those alone. I'd probably try ylang, with a dash of cinnamon, patchouli and a bergamot top, but not optimistic about that as a complete perfume. It would be in the direction of a perfume but not balanced. Your basenotes are lacking, for one thing, and the ingredients are not sufficient to avoid a thin, harsh effect.

    I'd also dilute to 10% and at least learn to optimise a lavender-clary accord as a useful exercise. You could use that knowledge then to, again, start going in the direction of a perfume. Other important exercises would be making cypress/lavender, and lavender/bergamot accords. Those top note exercises can then be combined. But you lack basenotes to make important accords.

    A lot of posters recently seem to want instant brilliant miracles from nothing with little effort/expense/time, and have not yet learned appropriate respect for the art. It's awkward then to advise properly.

    Virginia cedar has some sexy, perfumey characteristics, and no reason you can't wear a little. But again, that's not close to a perfume.

    Patchouli can be extremely sexy in the context of a perfume, especially if the oil is aged well; but you are lacking the ingredients to easily make that happen. But experiment with a patchouli-ylang accord, as a learning exercise. Both are very sexy oils. But as a duo I'd say it is incomplete. Both have a harsh edge. Same with patchouli-cedar, although certainly trying to make an accord between the two would be informative.

    The most important accords are between things with similar evaoporation profiles, and complimentary attributes, and you lack options here. For example, patchouli-musk is a basic chypre accord

    You have enough to start learning with. How's that? Then you need to read and learn more first. Then you will have to buy other ingredients.


    Edited by DrSmellThis - 7/23/13 at 12:55pm





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