Baieido Incense Reviews

    Baieido Incense Reviews

    post #1 of 35
    Thread Starter 

    I have been buying up different Baieido incenses and here is my take on a few I have purchased.

    KOBUNBOKU

    This is their standard and apparently best selling line which is very affordable and of a high quality. The smell is of Sandalwood with a light subtle clean flowery smell. It's very nice and kind of addictive. There is not much depth to the scent but it is high quality, incense you can buy lots of just to burn everyday.

    BAIEIDO EXCELLENT TOKUSEN KOBUNBOKU

    This is the premium incense of the Kobunboku range and my favorite. I love how this smells as it has a very spiritual vibe and is quite complex.

    I get sandalwood mixed in with green plant like smells along with a very lovely spiritual agarwood smell that I never get sick of smelling. It smells a little like the Oud in Tom Fords Oud Wood but more natural and better.

    The stick burns for 30 mins and unfurls to give you a complex olfactory experience with the woods and plant like smells only to uplift you with the almost mystical like agarwood note. I really like this incense.

    BYAKUDAN KOUBUNBOKU - EXTRA SANDALWOOD INCENSE


    I love this very affordable Sandalwood incense and hand on my heart this is the best Sandalwood incense I have smelled. I have some Indian Sandalwood incense from Pure Incense that I loved before this and that now smells crude in comparison.

    The smell is one of a very refined woods with a slight creamy almost crystalline aroma that is multifaceted. In a way that on just one smell you are experiencing different aspects of the Mysore heartwood at once. When you are hit with the smoke it really is heavenly.

    Now what I found different in this than the Indian variety is that this is the smell of burning sandalwood with the emphasis on WOODs. Where with the Indian variety they use the oil and usually they add vanilla in the base to make it more sweet.

    Smelling Baeido's natural though I believe they have added a few herbs or spice to complement the Sandalwood is so much better than the oil added to bamboo stick variety.

    This is a gorgeous sandalwood that captures the magic of the Mysore heartwood and it can be had for a very reasonable price. I have spent a lot of time and effort trying to smell the "good stuff" in expensive synthetic colognes. Where all along under my nose you can experience the heavenly smell of Mysore in a incense.

    KAI UN KOH INCENSE

    Apparently this incense is from a ancient traditional Japanese recipe used in temples in days gone by. Also it is different in that the sticks are slightly thicker than the very thin usual Japanese sticks and are squared off at both ends.

    I found this to smell very spicy and earthy with that slight smell of burning woods. It also has a freshness about it. if you could imagine walking through a forest early one morning and smell the earthy smell of burning woods on the breeze that also has a spicy aroma then you are nearly there.

    I like this but after a while my nose starts to filter out the scent that I begin not to smell it. It's really strange to be surrounded by its smoke up close but not smell anything. Sometimes it's fine and I can smell it but at other times I get olfactory fatigue with this one.

    FINAL THOUGHTS

    All I have left that I want to smell from Baeido isKaden Kobunboku and Shu Koh Koku.

    From all the different ones I have tried I have been impressed with the quality and natural complex woody smells.

    The only problem I have had is that sometimes because the incense is very subtle is that my noise has a tendency to filter out the smell so you tend not to smell it. I'm not sure if this is olfactory fatigue or that my nose has gotten used to the smell so I cannot smell it. Sometimes I have had to walk out of a room and then back in again to smell the fragrance anew.

    All in all a wonderful range of incense fragrances!

    post #2 of 35

    Thanks for taking the time to do this, Jack.

    I totally agree that they're a different experience to 'normal' incense.

    Did you read in the article on the Home page where the Master explains 'listening' to the scent? - it is something for me to do, possibly after further reading.

    post #3 of 35
    Thread Starter 

    I have just read that article lpp, thanks I would have missed it otherwise. It was very insightful and written in a really wonderful way.

    post #4 of 35

    It made me want to find out more, Jack, which is usually a good sign!

    Fascinating area.

    Will you be exploring other makes as well?

    post #5 of 35
    Thread Starter 

    I want to explore more incenses from Shoyeido, this time from their premium range. I have my eye on a few from their range. I do love the woody dominated and complex blends that the Japanese do so well in their incense.

    post #6 of 35

    Yes, they really do manage to blend the woods amazingly well!

    And I think that I'd rather use them sparingly at special times than miss out on their beauty and skill in favour of something less special.

    The subtlety impresses me - that's why the bit in the article about 'listening' to them made sense to me.

    Just random, 'in the same room as' background smelling doesn't do them any justice, does it?

    post #7 of 35
    Thread Starter 

    The great thing though is that they have "Daily Incenses" which can be used as a background everyday incense as well as others that you would you use for quiet periods of reflection and meditation. So you can have the best of both worlds so to speak.

    post #8 of 35

    Yes, hoping that some of those 'Daily' ones (amongst others) will be here from Japan tomorrow :)

    It's definitely a fascinating area to explore, but the woodsy ones are the ones that appeal most to me - so far!

    I think that some tea ones are coming too, although I forget which brands.

    post #9 of 35
    Thread Starter 

    That sounds interesting please share your thoughts on what you think here or the other home fragrance thread may be more appropriate.

    I do have one Japanese floral incense called "Seeds Of Transformation" and it's stunning because of the high quality essential oil that is used. But it does not measure up to the complex woody aromas that you get with Baieido. I find lighting a stick at bedtime gives your mind the time to reflect on what you are smelling than would be the case normally. Helps me sleep too.

    You know that website " Esscence Of Ages" they do sample packs of the high end premium Japanese incenses which also include the top Kyra incense. At some point I will have to see for myself what all the fuss is about with the Kyra incense that you hear so much about.

    post #10 of 35

    Yes, Jack, they may be more appropriate in the other thread - I won't know until they arrive, but some were aloeswood and some might have been floral!

    Baleido are definitely excellent quality and the Kyara ones possibly the ones to aim for, although the sandalwood must be worth a try!

    The 'starter' NK one that I bought has encouraged me to explore the kyara further in the future as it's such a magical fragrance.

    I think that I appreciate them best at bedtime too.

    post #11 of 35

    These turned up today (very quickly) from the lovely Watari at kohgen who also sent an interesting sample that has not yet been identified due to lack of time.

    The translation from more than one Japanese website seems to show the Baieido brand as 'Incense plum Sakae Temple', but I've checked them out on the official Baieido website and they are both shown there so the serial numbers have been included below.

    The website recommends the first box as an economic choice.

    The first box contains Syukohkoku (#570), Vietnamese aloeswood with sandalwood and herbs. The sticks burn for about 30 minutes and are strong enough to scent a room. They're a little more harsh than the ones below, but are fine for everyday use as the box contains about 170 g - over 400, perhaps 500 sticks (descriptions seem to vary) @ 5250 yen. There is a slight hint of something a little bitter, like myrhh, to me in these at times, but they're very nice indeed.

    The other Baiedo one is Koko noe (#766), from the Super Premium series @ 1890 yen for about 50 sticks containing Kalimantan (Indonesian) aloeswood, beautifully presented in a Paulownia wood box.

    They burn for a little longer and are beautifully fragrant and more mellow.

    The packaging is simpler than the NK Kyara Kongo ones.

    post #12 of 35
    Thread Starter 

    They look great lpp, thanks for sharing. ThatSyukohkoku is the one I am working up to getting last as it's the most premium one ofthe affordable range. It's supposed to have a premium agarwood better than theKobunboku range. And I read that the Koko noe is nice and spicy.

    I found with Baieido that there is a learning curve in that they get better and better as you go along, and you pick up things later that you did not notice on the first few sticks you burn.

    post #13 of 35

    They're both quite spicy, Jack, and I was surprised by the distance that they permeated the house too! The fragrance also seems to be quite long-lasting.

    The sample is the kobunboku, but I haven't tried it yet!

    I think both that one and the Syukohkoku contain cloves & cassia.

    You're quite right about learning curves! There is so much skill in the blending - the Syukohkoku ones seem to alter a lot as they burn too - I'm getting a different scent from the one that's almost finished. I think that they are better from a distance, rather than close up too.

    I finally gave in and ordered the Seeds of Transformation ones too as lily sounds really nice :)

    (The other ones (The Vert) are French/Japanese by Esteban but out of stock on the manufacturer's website so I will just enjoy them unless they re-stock).

    Experimenting with these has really been quite a revelation to me - thank you!

    post #14 of 35
    Thread Starter 

    Looks like you have many happy days of burning those sticks. One thing I noticed is when I went back to burn some of these Indian sticks from Pure Incense is that they seemed crude in comparison to the Japanese ones. Where as before I really liked them and now I just can't burn them anymore.

    I think it's to do with the depth of the woody aromas and the complex blends that the Japanese incense has which is lacking with the Indian ones, they actually challenge the mind more in their scent profile and natural quality.

    You are going to love those "Seeds Of Transformation" incense sticks as they are stunningly beautiful. I have been burning them during the recent heatwave and it's been lovely to enjoy the scent of fresh lilies. In fact if you want to impress any visitors then these are the ones as they are real crowd pleasing show stoppers.lol

    post #15 of 35

    Yes, funnily enough Jack, I did burn an Indian one the other day and was very surprised!

    I hadn't really explored Japanese ones very far before.

    The Japanese recipes are very complex, though, in comparison and the ingredients are of a much higher quality too, plus the whole cultural thing behind it all - fascinating.

    The purity is definitely another consideration.

    I was also very pleased that the Baieido people seem to put their energy into the quality of the product, rather than the packaging - although there does seem to be quite a market for gift sets generally in the market.

    I'd much rather pay for the product than for the packaging or yet more holders!

    Can't wait to try the lily ones now!

    7/24/13 at 11:41am

    Jack Hunter said:



    I have been buying up different Baieido incenses and here is my take on a few I have purchased.

    KOBUNBOKU

    This is their standard and apparently best selling line which is very affordable and of a high quality. The smell is of Sandalwood with a light subtle clean flowery smell. It's very nice and kind of addictive. There is not much depth to the scent but it is high quality, incense you can buy lots of just to burn everyday.

    BAIEIDO EXCELLENT TOKUSEN KOBUNBOKU

    This is the premium incense of the Kobunboku range and my favorite. I love how this smells as it has a very spiritual vibe and is quite complex.

    I get sandalwood mixed in with green plant like smells along with a very lovely spiritual agarwood smell that I never get sick of smelling. It smells a little like the Oud in Tom Fords Oud Wood but more natural and better.

    The stick burns for 30 mins and unfurls to give you a complex olfactory experience with the woods and plant like smells only to uplift you with the almost mystical like agarwood note. I really like this incense.

    BYAKUDAN KOUBUNBOKU - EXTRA SANDALWOOD INCENSE


    I love this very affordable Sandalwood incense and hand on my heart this is the best Sandalwood incense I have smelled. I have some Indian Sandalwood incense from Pure Incense that I loved before this and that now smells crude in comparison.

    The smell is one of a very refined woods with a slight creamy almost crystalline aroma that is multifaceted. In a way that on just one smell you are experiencing different aspects of the Mysore heartwood at once. When you are hit with the smoke it really is heavenly.

    Now what I found different in this than the Indian variety is that this is the smell of burning sandalwood with the emphasis on WOODs. Where with the Indian variety they use the oil and usually they add vanilla in the base to make it more sweet.

    Smelling Baeido's natural though I believe they have added a few herbs or spice to complement the Sandalwood is so much better than the oil added to bamboo stick variety.

    This is a gorgeous sandalwood that captures the magic of the Mysore heartwood and it can be had for a very reasonable price. I have spent a lot of time and effort trying to smell the "good stuff" in expensive synthetic colognes. Where all along under my nose you can experience the heavenly smell of Mysore in a incense.

    KAI UN KOH INCENSE

    Apparently this incense is from a ancient traditional Japanese recipe used in temples in days gone by. Also it is different in that the sticks are slightly thicker than the very thin usual Japanese sticks and are squared off at both ends.

    I found this to smell very spicy and earthy with that slight smell of burning woods. It also has a freshness about it. if you could imagine walking through a forest early one morning and smell the earthy smell of burning woods on the breeze that also has a spicy aroma then you are nearly there.

    I like this but after a while my nose starts to filter out the scent that I begin not to smell it. It's really strange to be surrounded by its smoke up close but not smell anything. Sometimes it's fine and I can smell it but at other times I get olfactory fatigue with this one.

    FINAL THOUGHTS

    All I have left that I want to smell from Baeido isKaden Kobunboku and Shu Koh Koku.

    From all the different ones I have tried I have been impressed with the quality and natural complex woody smells.

    The only problem I have had is that sometimes because the incense is very subtle is that my noise has a tendency to filter out the smell so you tend not to smell it. I'm not sure if this is olfactory fatigue or that my nose has gotten used to the smell so I cannot smell it. Sometimes I have had to walk out of a room and then back in again to smell the fragrance anew.

    All in all a wonderful range of incense fragrances!

    7/24/13 at 12:16pm

    lpp said:



    Thanks for taking the time to do this, Jack.

    I totally agree that they're a different experience to 'normal' incense.

    Did you read in the article on the Home page where the Master explains 'listening' to the scent? - it is something for me to do, possibly after further reading.

    7/24/13 at 12:35pm

    Jack Hunter said:



    I have just read that article lpp, thanks I would have missed it otherwise. It was very insightful and written in a really wonderful way.

    7/24/13 at 12:53pm

    lpp said:



    It made me want to find out more, Jack, which is usually a good sign!

    Fascinating area.

    Will you be exploring other makes as well?

    7/24/13 at 1:05pm

    Jack Hunter said:



    I want to explore more incenses from Shoyeido, this time from their premium range. I have my eye on a few from their range. I do love the woody dominated and complex blends that the Japanese do so well in their incense.

    7/24/13 at 1:15pm

    lpp said:



    Yes, they really do manage to blend the woods amazingly well!

    And I think that I'd rather use them sparingly at special times than miss out on their beauty and skill in favour of something less special.

    The subtlety impresses me - that's why the bit in the article about 'listening' to them made sense to me.

    Just random, 'in the same room as' background smelling doesn't do them any justice, does it?

    7/24/13 at 1:29pm

    Jack Hunter said:



    The great thing though is that they have "Daily Incenses" which can be used as a background everyday incense as well as others that you would you use for quiet periods of reflection and meditation. So you can have the best of both worlds so to speak.

    7/24/13 at 1:34pm

    lpp said:



    Yes, hoping that some of those 'Daily' ones (amongst others) will be here from Japan tomorrow :)

    It's definitely a fascinating area to explore, but the woodsy ones are the ones that appeal most to me - so far!

    I think that some tea ones are coming too, although I forget which brands.

    7/24/13 at 1:44pm

    Jack Hunter said:



    That sounds interesting please share your thoughts on what you think here or the other home fragrance thread may be more appropriate.

    I do have one Japanese floral incense called "Seeds Of Transformation" and it's stunning because of the high quality essential oil that is used. But it does not measure up to the complex woody aromas that you get with Baieido. I find lighting a stick at bedtime gives your mind the time to reflect on what you are smelling than would be the case normally. Helps me sleep too.

    You know that website " Esscence Of Ages" they do sample packs of the high end premium Japanese incenses which also include the top Kyra incense. At some point I will have to see for myself what all the fuss is about with the Kyra incense that you hear so much about.

    7/24/13 at 2:11pm

    lpp said:



    Yes, Jack, they may be more appropriate in the other thread - I won't know until they arrive, but some were aloeswood and some might have been floral!

    Baleido are definitely excellent quality and the Kyara ones possibly the ones to aim for, although the sandalwood must be worth a try!

    The 'starter' NK one that I bought has encouraged me to explore the kyara further in the future as it's such a magical fragrance.

    I think that I appreciate them best at bedtime too.

    7/25/13 at 10:48am

    lpp said:



    These turned up today (very quickly) from the lovely Watari at kohgen who also sent an interesting sample that has not yet been identified due to lack of time.

    The translation from more than one Japanese website seems to show the Baieido brand as 'Incense plum Sakae Temple', but I've checked them out on the official Baieido website and they are both shown there so the serial numbers have been included below.

    The website recommends the first box as an economic choice.

    The first box contains Syukohkoku (#570), Vietnamese aloeswood with sandalwood and herbs. The sticks burn for about 30 minutes and are strong enough to scent a room. They're a little more harsh than the ones below, but are fine for everyday use as the box contains about 170 g - over 400, perhaps 500 sticks (descriptions seem to vary) @ 5250 yen. There is a slight hint of something a little bitter, like myrhh, to me in these at times, but they're very nice indeed.

    The other Baiedo one is Koko noe (#766), from the Super Premium series @ 1890 yen for about 50 sticks containing Kalimantan (Indonesian) aloeswood, beautifully presented in a Paulownia wood box.

    They burn for a little longer and are beautifully fragrant and more mellow.

    The packaging is simpler than the NK Kyara Kongo ones.

    7/25/13 at 12:32pm

    Jack Hunter said:



    They look great lpp, thanks for sharing. ThatSyukohkoku is the one I am working up to getting last as it's the most premium one ofthe affordable range. It's supposed to have a premium agarwood better than theKobunboku range. And I read that the Koko noe is nice and spicy.

    I found with Baieido that there is a learning curve in that they get better and better as you go along, and you pick up things later that you did not notice on the first few sticks you burn.

    7/25/13 at 12:54pm

    lpp said:



    They're both quite spicy, Jack, and I was surprised by the distance that they permeated the house too! The fragrance also seems to be quite long-lasting.

    The sample is the kobunboku, but I haven't tried it yet!

    I think both that one and the Syukohkoku contain cloves & cassia.

    You're quite right about learning curves! There is so much skill in the blending - the Syukohkoku ones seem to alter a lot as they burn too - I'm getting a different scent from the one that's almost finished. I think that they are better from a distance, rather than close up too.

    I finally gave in and ordered the Seeds of Transformation ones too as lily sounds really nice :)

    (The other ones (The Vert) are French/Japanese by Esteban but out of stock on the manufacturer's website so I will just enjoy them unless they re-stock).

    Experimenting with these has really been quite a revelation to me - thank you!

    7/25/13 at 1:15pm

    Jack Hunter said:



    Looks like you have many happy days of burning those sticks. One thing I noticed is when I went back to burn some of these Indian sticks from Pure Incense is that they seemed crude in comparison to the Japanese ones. Where as before I really liked them and now I just can't burn them anymore.

    I think it's to do with the depth of the woody aromas and the complex blends that the Japanese incense has which is lacking with the Indian ones, they actually challenge the mind more in their scent profile and natural quality.

    You are going to love those "Seeds Of Transformation" incense sticks as they are stunningly beautiful. I have been burning them during the recent heatwave and it's been lovely to enjoy the scent of fresh lilies. In fact if you want to impress any visitors then these are the ones as they are real crowd pleasing show stoppers.lol

    7/25/13 at 1:30pm

    lpp said:



    Yes, funnily enough Jack, I did burn an Indian one the other day and was very surprised!

    I hadn't really explored Japanese ones very far before.

    The Japanese recipes are very complex, though, in comparison and the ingredients are of a much higher quality too, plus the whole cultural thing behind it all - fascinating.

    The purity is definitely another consideration.

    I was also very pleased that the Baieido people seem to put their energy into the quality of the product, rather than the packaging - although there does seem to be quite a market for gift sets generally in the market.

    I'd much rather pay for the product than for the packaging or yet more holders!

    Can't wait to try the lily ones now!





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