Givescone, how "strong" is it?

    Givescone, how "strong" is it?

    post #1 of 6
    Thread Starter 

    for whatever reason, I'm not too fond of givescone, whenever I smell I blend containing it i fixate on it. Is it truly this strong? Do others have the same problem? I want to use it, but I cant get to seem to get it to "flatten" into the blends. Even in trace amounts, maybe this is a personal thing. Also I can remember the first place I smelled it, the recess monitor in 5th grade smelled of givescone and stale coffee. When I smell it all i see is her, disgusting.

    post #2 of 6

    Given that Givescone was released in about 1986, your 5th Grade monitor may not have been wearing something with Givescone, but maybe it was a Damascone. But I suppose it depends on how old you are. It certainly wouldn't have been *MY* 5th Grade teacher had it been 1986.

    The Damascone family is not used in very high concentration, certainly, probably less than 0.5%, maybe even 0.25% OR LESS.

    I realize that TGSC says 10% for Givescone, but that's always a guideline, and is open for interpretation.

    Every material needs to be employed for it's strengths, and not in opposition to it's weaknesses. Every material must be learned about to know these strengths and weaknesses.

    Continue to work to understand and then employ Givescone for it's strengths, so that you don't create a weakness out of it.

    post #3 of 6

    Hi Nostrille,

    I start to second Paul. I use my Givescone at 10% and 1% working dilutions. Although i think i did not use it above .2% of the total fragrance mixture, i see what you mean. I could easily classify that perfume with an overdose of Givesconeshocked.gif


    In my experience, Givescone tends to fade and smoothen in a blend after about 6 weeks of maturing.

    But then again, smell is a strange thing. If you have an emotional connotation with this scent, it will *always* be to much, if you are able to detect it. I one day ate a faulty raw oyster, can't stand the smell of them a mile away.embarassed.gif

    Happy perfuming, and feel free to visit my blog.

    post #4 of 6
    I totally agree with pkiler. It relates to Damascone family which is very powerful. Try using it below 0.5% or even lower like Paul rightly said.
    post #5 of 6

    But I have to say that I composed a blend two nights ago, using all very mild ingredients, (I am waiting to give it any strong elements to redirect the shape of it ...), and I have Givescone at 2.5% and I can't really say that iit is dominating, at all. There is a slight apple-y element in the notes currently, (and this will probably calm down with time as JSparla mentions...) and the rest is clean green citrusy, So it's hard for me to imagine how Givescone really becomes so prominent when almost every other item in this blend is not loud at all.

    Maybe I have found a good element for it, I'm not sure, except that it's not the loudest Kid on the block this time...

    post #6 of 6
    Thread Starter 

    Thanks for the feedback. I was in 5th grade in 1999. I recently mixed givescone in a 1:1 ratio with para cresyl methyl ether and was pleased with the way it blended, so it may be what I tend to combine it with that is the issue.

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    7/31/13 at 2:21pm

    nostrille said:



    for whatever reason, I'm not too fond of givescone, whenever I smell I blend containing it i fixate on it. Is it truly this strong? Do others have the same problem? I want to use it, but I cant get to seem to get it to "flatten" into the blends. Even in trace amounts, maybe this is a personal thing. Also I can remember the first place I smelled it, the recess monitor in 5th grade smelled of givescone and stale coffee. When I smell it all i see is her, disgusting.

    7/31/13 at 8:33pm

    pkiler said:



    Given that Givescone was released in about 1986, your 5th Grade monitor may not have been wearing something with Givescone, but maybe it was a Damascone. But I suppose it depends on how old you are. It certainly wouldn't have been *MY* 5th Grade teacher had it been 1986.

    The Damascone family is not used in very high concentration, certainly, probably less than 0.5%, maybe even 0.25% OR LESS.

    I realize that TGSC says 10% for Givescone, but that's always a guideline, and is open for interpretation.

    Every material needs to be employed for it's strengths, and not in opposition to it's weaknesses. Every material must be learned about to know these strengths and weaknesses.

    Continue to work to understand and then employ Givescone for it's strengths, so that you don't create a weakness out of it.

    8/1/13 at 12:44am

    jsparla said:



    Hi Nostrille,

    I start to second Paul. I use my Givescone at 10% and 1% working dilutions. Although i think i did not use it above .2% of the total fragrance mixture, i see what you mean. I could easily classify that perfume with an overdose of Givesconeshocked.gif


    In my experience, Givescone tends to fade and smoothen in a blend after about 6 weeks of maturing.

    But then again, smell is a strange thing. If you have an emotional connotation with this scent, it will *always* be to much, if you are able to detect it. I one day ate a faulty raw oyster, can't stand the smell of them a mile away.embarassed.gif

    Happy perfuming, and feel free to visit my blog.

    8/1/13 at 9:28am

    vicky2005 said:



    I totally agree with pkiler. It relates to Damascone family which is very powerful. Try using it below 0.5% or even lower like Paul rightly said.

    8/4/13 at 9:07pm

    pkiler said:



    But I have to say that I composed a blend two nights ago, using all very mild ingredients, (I am waiting to give it any strong elements to redirect the shape of it ...), and I have Givescone at 2.5% and I can't really say that iit is dominating, at all. There is a slight apple-y element in the notes currently, (and this will probably calm down with time as JSparla mentions...) and the rest is clean green citrusy, So it's hard for me to imagine how Givescone really becomes so prominent when almost every other item in this blend is not loud at all.

    Maybe I have found a good element for it, I'm not sure, except that it's not the loudest Kid on the block this time...

    8/6/13 at 3:54pm

    nostrille said:



    Thanks for the feedback. I was in 5th grade in 1999. I recently mixed givescone in a 1:1 ratio with para cresyl methyl ether and was pleased with the way it blended, so it may be what I tend to combine it with that is the issue.





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