Massive fragrance-flavor network graph

    Massive fragrance-flavor network graph

    post #1 of 16
    Thread Starter 
    Greetings. I'm not into fragrances necessarily, but I have had a strong nose ever since a "traumatic" olfactory incident: my apartment got covered in mold while I was away on a long vacation (to date, the apartment as well as my respiratory health are fine - my nose however has never been the same).
    It drives me nuts because I can smell things that other people can't smell, and most importantly, you can't google about smells - the internet is anosmic, apparently.
    My hyperosmia has motivated me to create this database:
    It cross-references over 3000 flavors/fragrances, using the Aldrich catalog index.
    With it you can see the relationship between aromas and their constituent chemicals. (Rosemary and moth balls is what got me started on this whole thing; they share eucalyptol.)
    *if you are not familiar with using google fusion network graphs, it should only take a few minutes of playing around to figure out how the filters work.
    **there are pretty good tutorials on how to use it, just youtube "google fusion graphs".
    update:
    As per nemenator's suggestion, I've done my best to strip-out only 'natural' chemical compounds, essential oils, etc. to create anAftelier Fragrance Wheel version of the network graph:

    ^here is a screenshot of what thenetwork graph looks like; the real fun, however, is inusingthe graph to answer questions you might have about the relationships between various odors and their correlating chemicals.


    Edited by nebule - 9/14/13 at 5:02pm
    post #2 of 16

    I was not able to make it work; me dumb! I was not aware that Rosemary Oil contained Napthalene either.

    post #3 of 16

    So awesome!! You've got to finish it!

    post #4 of 16

    Shame we don't all use IE/Chrome ;)

    post #5 of 16
    Thread Starter 
    if this helps...
    **it won't work the same on anything less than IE8; it works on Chrome.
    ***if all else fails, there are pretty good tutorials on how to use it.
    It's hard for me to tell for sure (probably because I don't know much at all about smell) but tar camphor is definitely a common chemical between rosemary and moth balls; I can't be certain that tar camphor and naphthalene are like the same thing...
    post #6 of 16
    Great work. This is want I am going to be doing for the next hour.
    post #7 of 16

    Nice idea!

    post #8 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nebuleView Post

    if this helps...
    **it won't work the same on anything less than IE8; it works on Chrome.
    ***if all else fails, there are pretty good tutorials on how to use it.
    It's hard for me to tell for sure (probably because I don't know much at all about smell) but tar camphor is definitely a common chemical between rosemary and moth balls; I can't be certain that tar camphor and naphthalene are like the same thing...

    As far as I am aware Rosemary does not contain Naphthalene. Old fashioned mothballs were only made of Naphthalene, but I think it has been banned now. Rosemary contains some Camphor (not much), it's main constituent is 1-8-Cineole which is found in Spike Lavender, Lavandin and Eucalyptus.

    As a total IT idiot, I have no idea what you mean by IE8 or Chrome.

    post #9 of 16

    IE8 is the Microsoft browser, David and Chrome is a Google browser!

    I think that they may still make Napthalene moth products in China, but am not too sure - the pheromone traps seem to be in use these days.

    We annoy them with patchouli or citric oils.

    post #10 of 16

    This is a great way of illustrating data connections. So I thought it would be useful to show the Essential Oils from the Aldrich data and their scents in a modern version of the Natural Fragrance Wheel.

    https://www.google.com/fusiontables/DataSource?docid=1rg2APmzy9tjvruNtbY0e6J8bn0Hcj5gfR7lLv8U#chartnew:id=3

    post #11 of 16
    Thread Starter 

    nice!!! So the Natural Fragrance Wheel deals only with essential oils..meaning any non-synthesized chemicals? Is this a universally-recognized classification system; is there such a thing? I want to do more w the data in terms of organization, but the smell-intelligentsia is kind of non-existent (except for this forum, of course), and I don't want to make more of a mess of it.

    also (since I'm fairly new to using g-docs etc), you were able to pull the original spreadsheet off, manipulate it and put it back on your own page?

    post #12 of 16
    Thread Starter 

    for David, I took a screenshot so you can see what it looks like (this is the natural oil version put up by nemenator). It shows how something like cardamom oil is in many categories at once, or how cognac oil is lonely.

    post #13 of 16

    OK, let's make our own mega 'Natural Fragrance Wheel' using 'natural' aromachemicals and essential oils & absolutes. First let's thank Nebule and Sigma Aldrich for the nice data, and export it into Excel. Then we show the compounds that include 'natural' (don't shoot me I am only the messenger) eg Vanillin (natural) by using Autofilter on the compound column and filtering for *natural* or *oil*. Then optionally: manually edit out the flavour-only chemicals eg meaty & cheesy, and some duplicate rows eg red thyme or white thyme which make no real difference. Then we copy the resulting spreadsheet into a new one and upload that to Google fusiontables, play around with the filters and the chart, et voila the definitive Natural Fragrance er, Wheel. Mandy Aftel, eat your heart out :)

    post #14 of 16
    Thread Starter 
    Almost done. Would you take out 'cheese', 'butter', and 'creamy' (that's anything under the 'fatty' category)?
    And (after filtering 'natural' and 'oil') are the leftover aldrich categories the same as the aftel's?
    post #15 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nebuleView Post

    for David, I took a screenshot so you can see what it looks like (this is the natural oil version put up by nemenator). It shows how something like cardamom oil is in many categories at once, or how cognac oil is lonely.

    Thank you, it is a very good idea and most useful to amateur and pros alike.

    post #16 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nebuleView Post

    Almost done. Would you take out 'cheese', 'butter', and 'creamy' (that's anything under the 'fatty' category)?
    And (after filtering 'natural' and 'oil') are the leftover aldrich categories the same as the aftel's?

    I think "Cheese", "butter", and "creamy" are three separate descriptors and should be kept in.

    class="

    8/12/13 at 8:58pm

    nebule said:



    Greetings. I'm not into fragrances necessarily, but I have had a strong nose ever since a "traumatic" olfactory incident: my apartment got covered in mold while I was away on a long vacation (to date, the apartment as well as my respiratory health are fine - my nose however has never been the same).
    It drives me nuts because I can smell things that other people can't smell, and most importantly, you can't google about smells - the internet is anosmic, apparently.
    My hyperosmia has motivated me to create this database:
    It cross-references over 3000 flavors/fragrances, using the Aldrich catalog index.
    With it you can see the relationship between aromas and their constituent chemicals. (Rosemary and moth balls is what got me started on this whole thing; they share eucalyptol.)
    *if you are not familiar with using google fusion network graphs, it should only take a few minutes of playing around to figure out how the filters work.
    **there are pretty good tutorials on how to use it, just youtube "google fusion graphs".
    update:
    As per nemenator's suggestion, I've done my best to strip-out only 'natural' chemical compounds, essential oils, etc. to create anAftelier Fragrance Wheel version of the network graph:

    ^here is a screenshot of what thenetwork graph looks like; the real fun, however, is inusingthe graph to answer questions you might have about the relationships between various odors and their correlating chemicals.


    Edited by nebule - 9/14/13 at 5:02pm

    8/13/13 at 11:16am

    David Ruskin said:



    I was not able to make it work; me dumb! I was not aware that Rosemary Oil contained Napthalene either.

    8/13/13 at 11:39am

    MonkeyBars said:



    So awesome!! You've got to finish it!

    8/13/13 at 11:41am

    lpp said:



    Shame we don't all use IE/Chrome ;)

    8/13/13 at 11:42am

    nebule said:



    if this helps...
    **it won't work the same on anything less than IE8; it works on Chrome.
    ***if all else fails, there are pretty good tutorials on how to use it.
    It's hard for me to tell for sure (probably because I don't know much at all about smell) but tar camphor is definitely a common chemical between rosemary and moth balls; I can't be certain that tar camphor and naphthalene are like the same thing...

    8/13/13 at 11:43am

    williampaul1969 said:



    Great work. This is want I am going to be doing for the next hour.

    8/13/13 at 11:40pm

    JEBeasley said:



    Nice idea!

    8/14/13 at 1:29am

    David Ruskin said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nebuleView Post

    if this helps...
    **it won't work the same on anything less than IE8; it works on Chrome.
    ***if all else fails, there are pretty good tutorials on how to use it.
    It's hard for me to tell for sure (probably because I don't know much at all about smell) but tar camphor is definitely a common chemical between rosemary and moth balls; I can't be certain that tar camphor and naphthalene are like the same thing...

    As far as I am aware Rosemary does not contain Naphthalene. Old fashioned mothballs were only made of Naphthalene, but I think it has been banned now. Rosemary contains some Camphor (not much), it's main constituent is 1-8-Cineole which is found in Spike Lavender, Lavandin and Eucalyptus.

    As a total IT idiot, I have no idea what you mean by IE8 or Chrome.

    8/14/13 at 1:35am

    lpp said:



    IE8 is the Microsoft browser, David and Chrome is a Google browser!

    I think that they may still make Napthalene moth products in China, but am not too sure - the pheromone traps seem to be in use these days.

    We annoy them with patchouli or citric oils.

    8/15/13 at 12:51pm

    nemenator said:



    This is a great way of illustrating data connections. So I thought it would be useful to show the Essential Oils from the Aldrich data and their scents in a modern version of the Natural Fragrance Wheel.

    https://www.google.com/fusiontables/DataSource?docid=1rg2APmzy9tjvruNtbY0e6J8bn0Hcj5gfR7lLv8U#chartnew:id=3

    8/15/13 at 2:12pm

    nebule said:



    nice!!! So the Natural Fragrance Wheel deals only with essential oils..meaning any non-synthesized chemicals? Is this a universally-recognized classification system; is there such a thing? I want to do more w the data in terms of organization, but the smell-intelligentsia is kind of non-existent (except for this forum, of course), and I don't want to make more of a mess of it.

    also (since I'm fairly new to using g-docs etc), you were able to pull the original spreadsheet off, manipulate it and put it back on your own page?

    8/15/13 at 2:21pm

    nebule said:



    for David, I took a screenshot so you can see what it looks like (this is the natural oil version put up by nemenator). It shows how something like cardamom oil is in many categories at once, or how cognac oil is lonely.

    8/15/13 at 3:27pm

    nemenator said:



    OK, let's make our own mega 'Natural Fragrance Wheel' using 'natural' aromachemicals and essential oils & absolutes. First let's thank Nebule and Sigma Aldrich for the nice data, and export it into Excel. Then we show the compounds that include 'natural' (don't shoot me I am only the messenger) eg Vanillin (natural) by using Autofilter on the compound column and filtering for *natural* or *oil*. Then optionally: manually edit out the flavour-only chemicals eg meaty & cheesy, and some duplicate rows eg red thyme or white thyme which make no real difference. Then we copy the resulting spreadsheet into a new one and upload that to Google fusiontables, play around with the filters and the chart, et voila the definitive Natural Fragrance er, Wheel. Mandy Aftel, eat your heart out :)

    8/15/13 at 6:22pm

    nebule said:



    Almost done. Would you take out 'cheese', 'butter', and 'creamy' (that's anything under the 'fatty' category)?
    And (after filtering 'natural' and 'oil') are the leftover aldrich categories the same as the aftel's?

    8/16/13 at 2:22am

    David Ruskin said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nebuleView Post

    for David, I took a screenshot so you can see what it looks like (this is the natural oil version put up by nemenator). It shows how something like cardamom oil is in many categories at once, or how cognac oil is lonely.

    Thank you, it is a very good idea and most useful to amateur and pros alike.

    8/16/13 at 2:24am

    David Ruskin said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nebuleView Post

    Almost done. Would you take out 'cheese', 'butter', and 'creamy' (that's anything under the 'fatty' category)?
    And (after filtering 'natural' and 'oil') are the leftover aldrich categories the same as the aftel's?

    I think "Cheese", "butter", and "creamy" are three separate descriptors and should be kept in.





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