Perfume art and art movements: what fragrance would you say fits what movement?

    Perfume art and art movements: what fragrance would you say fits what movement?

    post #1 of 90
    Thread Starter 

    Chandler Burr's Untitled series made me think about this topic again.

     

    So a call out to the art lovers and aesthetics connaisseurs:

     

    which particular fragrances do you think are an expression of a certain art movement (like for example Impressionism, Surrealism, Magic Realism etc)?

     

    Looking forward to your thoughts :)

    post #2 of 90

    Germaine Cellier's stuff (Fracas, Bandit) is often referred to as fauvist, because of the bold accords.

     

    For brutalism, a lot of modern niche stuff, from HdP's trio to some of the CDG series.

     

    Baroque: classic Amouages, the more structured Lutenses.

     

    Secretions Magnifique: conceptualism.  ELdO's graphic used to have a surrealist quality, though I don't think that would apply to the perfumes (save perhaps Jasmin et cigarette).

     

    cacio

    post #3 of 90
    Thread Starter 

    Thank you Cacio, for the interesting input! Are these examples of something you personally experience as such? 

    post #4 of 90

    Not sure this works undecided.gif

     

    Can't think of any linked to Futurism or Vorticism -- they would have to be moving happy.gif

    post #5 of 90
    Thread Starter 

    Cross posting from the Untitled series thread

    http://www.basenotes.net/t/378417/chandler-burr-untitled-s01e10

     

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by chandlerburr View Post

    <<are there any exemplary works of scented art by big brands or commercially trained perfumers that would fit the Romanticism bill?>>

    Irina, there are a huge number of Romanticist perfumes, and many absolutely extraordinary works since from the second work of olfactory art—1889, Jicky—that stylistic school completely dominated the medium for thirty to forty years. From Le Chypre de Coty (or the reconstructions I've smelled) to Fracas (but not Tabac Blond, whose huge presence is nevertheless reserved), the heaving bosoms and the stormy nights and the passionate declaiming are everywhere.   

     

    ....

    Romanticist style is dense and lush and turns on unbound emotion—in literature, in music, in poetry. That’s its formal mandate. It fills Vol de Nuit and Mitsouko. 

     
     

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by chandlerburr View Post

    Interestingly the world’s first work of olfactory art, Fougere Royale, by the brilliant Parquet, was not at all Romanticist; it is, startlingly enough, a proto-Minimalism, linear, translucent, palpably ordered and carefully built. The artist Rodrigo Flores-Roux did an extraordinary reconstruction of it, and the small bottle he gave me is sitting three feet away from me as a write this. I smell it regularly. Here's something from 1884 and it smells like 2016. It’s…breathtaking and utterly unexpected.

    Personally I'm still struggling with categorizing perfumes within the definition of various art movements...

    post #6 of 90

    Irina:

     

    yes, these were my impressions (or impressions I share). Not sure instead I agree with Chandler Burr's examples of romanticism, nor with FR as minimalist. Not certainly in what I've smelled. But it is true that it is abstract, so perhaps it's more an example of abstractism.

     

    I agrew with you anyway that in general it's not that perfume could be categorized neatly into one or the other art movement. Just vague impressions.

     

    cacio

    post #7 of 90
    Thread Starter 

    Indeed, dear Cacio, every time I give it a try, it leaves me puzzled. I may have found a trick though: I'm no longer trying to fit olfactory art in a classical art movements that mostly applies to paintings, but to art forms that are more dynamic like film, dance, writing and architecture.

     

    Meaning that this would be perfectly possible wink.gif

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kaern View Post

    Not sure this works undecided.gif

     

    Can't think of any linked to Futurism or Vorticism -- they would have to be moving happy.gif

    post #8 of 90

    Ugh. Labored and laboring.

    post #9 of 90

    I think this is a great intellectual exercise, but I'm still too ignorant in the land of fragrances to say much. 

     

    What I like to think about sometimes is what great literary or movie character would wear. I started "playing" with this after reading a blog post on Bois de Jasmin.

    post #10 of 90
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sycomore View Post

    I think this is a great intellectual exercise, but I'm still too ignorant in the land of fragrances to say much. 

     

    What I like to think about sometimes is what great literary or movie character would wear. I started "playing" with this after reading a blog post on Bois de Jasmin.

    Sounds like fun! thumbup.gif

    post #11 of 90
    This is an interesting subject and I'd like to read more. Do you think the categorization of perfumes has anything to do with the perfumer's intent (and I don't mean to say that Germaine Cellier sat down and said "ok I'm going to make a Brutalist perfume," but was there something about her intention, or Piguet's, that made it so)? Or does the resulting perfume itself somehow find its category? And why?
    post #12 of 90

    Kagey:

     

    probably most of the times perfumes are unrelated to specific movements of the period, though great perfumers did have an intent and a style. I think that Cellier clearly wanted something unconventional, bright colors, excitement, though she wasn't probably thinking about Matisse or German expressionists.

     

    And somehow I also think that chypres seem to go well with art deco, but that's probably just my impression.

     

    but I think that sometimes there was an intent to link to artistic movements of the period. For instance, Geza Schoen and the like are clearly making perfumes that are the exact equivalent of minimalism (eg the helmut lang, which also fit the aesthetic of the brand).

     

    As an aside, I recently saw and got a perfume at the New Museum in NYC, commissioned by the Japanese Pritzker prize winning firm SANAA, which wanted a perfume corresponding to its architectural style. The perfume is called translucence, corresponding to said aesthetic. Funnily, it's a modern bright floral with a fun fresh celery note.

     

    As for vorticism and futurism, how about dynamic perfumes like Feu d'Issey or Breath of God: every time one smells, there's something new popping up.

     

    cacio

    post #13 of 90
    Early Guerlains such as Après l'Ondée irresistibly evoke Impressionists like Renoir and Monet to me. Then, in another genre, Tabac Blond= Tamara de Lempicka. Thanks for the great question/topic!
    post #14 of 90
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cacio View Post

    Kagey:

    probably most of the times perfumes are unrelated to specific movements of the period, though great perfumers did have an intent and a style. I think that Cellier clearly wanted something unconventional, bright colors, excitement, though she wasn't probably thinking about Matisse or German expressionists.

    And somehow I also think that chypres seem to go well with art deco, but that's probably just my impression.

    but I think that sometimes there was an intent to link to artistic movements of the period. For instance, Geza Schoen and the like are clearly making perfumes that are the exact equivalent of minimalism (eg the helmut lang, which also fit the aesthetic of the brand).

    As an aside, I recently saw and got a perfume at the New Museum in NYC, commissioned by the Japanese Pritzker prize winning firm SANAA, which wanted a perfume corresponding to its architectural style. The perfume is called translucence, corresponding to said aesthetic. Funnily, it's a modern bright floral with a fun fresh celery note.

    As for vorticism and futurism, how about dynamic perfumes like Feu d'Issey or Breath of God: every time one smells, there's something new popping up.

    cacio

    Thanks, Cacio. Great post!

    When you say Geza Schoen and the like, who else do you mean? And do you think his compositions for Ormonde Jayne fit into the minimalist category? Is CK One a minimalist perfume? I could almost see it being postmodern, though that may be the ad campaign I'm remembering.

    I'd agree about chypres being Art Deco. I can understand your impression. I think my problem is that I don't know enough about art movements to be articulate about any of this! Really fascinating, though.
    post #15 of 90
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kagey View Post

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cacio View Post

    Kagey:

    probably most of the times perfumes are unrelated to specific movements of the period, though great perfumers did have an intent and a style. I think that Cellier clearly wanted something unconventional, bright colors, excitement, though she wasn't probably thinking about Matisse or German expressionists.

    And somehow I also think that chypres seem to go well with art deco, but that's probably just my impression.

    but I think that sometimes there was an intent to link to artistic movements of the period. For instance, Geza Schoen and the like are clearly making perfumes that are the exact equivalent of minimalism (eg the helmut lang, which also fit the aesthetic of the brand).

    As an aside, I recently saw and got a perfume at the New Museum in NYC, commissioned by the Japanese Pritzker prize winning firm SANAA, which wanted a perfume corresponding to its architectural style. The perfume is called translucence, corresponding to said aesthetic. Funnily, it's a modern bright floral with a fun fresh celery note.

    As for vorticism and futurism, how about dynamic perfumes like Feu d'Issey or Breath of God: every time one smells, there's something new popping up.

    cacio

    Thanks, Cacio. Great post!

    When you say Geza Schoen and the like, who else do you mean? And do you think his compositions for Ormonde Jayne fit into the minimalist category? Is CK One a minimalist perfume? I could almost see it being postmodern, though that may be the ad campaign I'm remembering.

    I'd agree about chypres being Art Deco. I can understand your impression. I think my problem is that I don't know enough about art movements to be articulate about any of this! Really fascinating, though.

    I think that in some ways, artistic movements are like the classifications of chemical reactions. Except for the most obvious, the only way to really be good at categorizing them is to have done quite a few categorizations already - to the point where it's second-nature.
    post #16 of 90

    8/14/13 at 3:10am

    Irina said:



    Chandler Burr's Untitled series made me think about this topic again.

     

    So a call out to the art lovers and aesthetics connaisseurs:

     

    which particular fragrances do you think are an expression of a certain art movement (like for example Impressionism, Surrealism, Magic Realism etc)?

     

    Looking forward to your thoughts :)

    8/14/13 at 5:30am

    cacio said:



    Germaine Cellier's stuff (Fracas, Bandit) is often referred to as fauvist, because of the bold accords.

     

    For brutalism, a lot of modern niche stuff, from HdP's trio to some of the CDG series.

     

    Baroque: classic Amouages, the more structured Lutenses.

     

    Secretions Magnifique: conceptualism.  ELdO's graphic used to have a surrealist quality, though I don't think that would apply to the perfumes (save perhaps Jasmin et cigarette).

     

    cacio

    8/14/13 at 6:30am

    Irina said:



    Thank you Cacio, for the interesting input! Are these examples of something you personally experience as such? 

    8/14/13 at 6:40am

    Kaern said:



    Not sure this works undecided.gif

     

    Can't think of any linked to Futurism or Vorticism -- they would have to be moving happy.gif

    8/16/13 at 1:21am

    Irina said:



    Cross posting from the Untitled series thread

    http://www.basenotes.net/t/378417/chandler-burr-untitled-s01e10

     

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by chandlerburr View Post

    <<are there any exemplary works of scented art by big brands or commercially trained perfumers that would fit the Romanticism bill?>>

    Irina, there are a huge number of Romanticist perfumes, and many absolutely extraordinary works since from the second work of olfactory art—1889, Jicky—that stylistic school completely dominated the medium for thirty to forty years. From Le Chypre de Coty (or the reconstructions I've smelled) to Fracas (but not Tabac Blond, whose huge presence is nevertheless reserved), the heaving bosoms and the stormy nights and the passionate declaiming are everywhere.   

     

    ....

    Romanticist style is dense and lush and turns on unbound emotion—in literature, in music, in poetry. That’s its formal mandate. It fills Vol de Nuit and Mitsouko. 

     
     

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by chandlerburr View Post

    Interestingly the world’s first work of olfactory art, Fougere Royale, by the brilliant Parquet, was not at all Romanticist; it is, startlingly enough, a proto-Minimalism, linear, translucent, palpably ordered and carefully built. The artist Rodrigo Flores-Roux did an extraordinary reconstruction of it, and the small bottle he gave me is sitting three feet away from me as a write this. I smell it regularly. Here's something from 1884 and it smells like 2016. It’s…breathtaking and utterly unexpected.

    Personally I'm still struggling with categorizing perfumes within the definition of various art movements...

    8/16/13 at 5:53am

    cacio said:



    Irina:

     

    yes, these were my impressions (or impressions I share). Not sure instead I agree with Chandler Burr's examples of romanticism, nor with FR as minimalist. Not certainly in what I've smelled. But it is true that it is abstract, so perhaps it's more an example of abstractism.

     

    I agrew with you anyway that in general it's not that perfume could be categorized neatly into one or the other art movement. Just vague impressions.

     

    cacio

    8/16/13 at 12:29pm

    Irina said:



    Indeed, dear Cacio, every time I give it a try, it leaves me puzzled. I may have found a trick though: I'm no longer trying to fit olfactory art in a classical art movements that mostly applies to paintings, but to art forms that are more dynamic like film, dance, writing and architecture.

     

    Meaning that this would be perfectly possible wink.gif

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kaern View Post

    Not sure this works undecided.gif

     

    Can't think of any linked to Futurism or Vorticism -- they would have to be moving happy.gif

    8/17/13 at 10:32am

    treeman5823 said:



    Ugh. Labored and laboring.

    8/17/13 at 10:53am

    sycomore said:



    I think this is a great intellectual exercise, but I'm still too ignorant in the land of fragrances to say much. 

     

    What I like to think about sometimes is what great literary or movie character would wear. I started "playing" with this after reading a blog post on Bois de Jasmin.

    8/17/13 at 11:06am

    Irina said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sycomore View Post

    I think this is a great intellectual exercise, but I'm still too ignorant in the land of fragrances to say much. 

     

    What I like to think about sometimes is what great literary or movie character would wear. I started "playing" with this after reading a blog post on Bois de Jasmin.

    Sounds like fun! thumbup.gif

    8/17/13 at 11:10am

    Kagey said:



    This is an interesting subject and I'd like to read more. Do you think the categorization of perfumes has anything to do with the perfumer's intent (and I don't mean to say that Germaine Cellier sat down and said "ok I'm going to make a Brutalist perfume," but was there something about her intention, or Piguet's, that made it so)? Or does the resulting perfume itself somehow find its category? And why?

    8/17/13 at 2:17pm

    cacio said:



    Kagey:

     

    probably most of the times perfumes are unrelated to specific movements of the period, though great perfumers did have an intent and a style. I think that Cellier clearly wanted something unconventional, bright colors, excitement, though she wasn't probably thinking about Matisse or German expressionists.

     

    And somehow I also think that chypres seem to go well with art deco, but that's probably just my impression.

     

    but I think that sometimes there was an intent to link to artistic movements of the period. For instance, Geza Schoen and the like are clearly making perfumes that are the exact equivalent of minimalism (eg the helmut lang, which also fit the aesthetic of the brand).

     

    As an aside, I recently saw and got a perfume at the New Museum in NYC, commissioned by the Japanese Pritzker prize winning firm SANAA, which wanted a perfume corresponding to its architectural style. The perfume is called translucence, corresponding to said aesthetic. Funnily, it's a modern bright floral with a fun fresh celery note.

     

    As for vorticism and futurism, how about dynamic perfumes like Feu d'Issey or Breath of God: every time one smells, there's something new popping up.

     

    cacio

    8/17/13 at 7:43pm

    jblanch1 said:



    Early Guerlains such as Après l'Ondée irresistibly evoke Impressionists like Renoir and Monet to me. Then, in another genre, Tabac Blond= Tamara de Lempicka. Thanks for the great question/topic!

    8/17/13 at 10:46pm

    Kagey said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cacio View Post

    Kagey:

    probably most of the times perfumes are unrelated to specific movements of the period, though great perfumers did have an intent and a style. I think that Cellier clearly wanted something unconventional, bright colors, excitement, though she wasn't probably thinking about Matisse or German expressionists.

    And somehow I also think that chypres seem to go well with art deco, but that's probably just my impression.

    but I think that sometimes there was an intent to link to artistic movements of the period. For instance, Geza Schoen and the like are clearly making perfumes that are the exact equivalent of minimalism (eg the helmut lang, which also fit the aesthetic of the brand).

    As an aside, I recently saw and got a perfume at the New Museum in NYC, commissioned by the Japanese Pritzker prize winning firm SANAA, which wanted a perfume corresponding to its architectural style. The perfume is called translucence, corresponding to said aesthetic. Funnily, it's a modern bright floral with a fun fresh celery note.

    As for vorticism and futurism, how about dynamic perfumes like Feu d'Issey or Breath of God: every time one smells, there's something new popping up.

    cacio

    Thanks, Cacio. Great post!

    When you say Geza Schoen and the like, who else do you mean? And do you think his compositions for Ormonde Jayne fit into the minimalist category? Is CK One a minimalist perfume? I could almost see it being postmodern, though that may be the ad campaign I'm remembering.

    I'd agree about chypres being Art Deco. I can understand your impression. I think my problem is that I don't know enough about art movements to be articulate about any of this! Really fascinating, though.

    8/17/13 at 11:17pm

    Redneck Perfumisto said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kagey View Post

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cacio View Post

    Kagey:

    probably most of the times perfumes are unrelated to specific movements of the period, though great perfumers did have an intent and a style. I think that Cellier clearly wanted something unconventional, bright colors, excitement, though she wasn't probably thinking about Matisse or German expressionists.

    And somehow I also think that chypres seem to go well with art deco, but that's probably just my impression.

    but I think that sometimes there was an intent to link to artistic movements of the period. For instance, Geza Schoen and the like are clearly making perfumes that are the exact equivalent of minimalism (eg the helmut lang, which also fit the aesthetic of the brand).

    As an aside, I recently saw and got a perfume at the New Museum in NYC, commissioned by the Japanese Pritzker prize winning firm SANAA, which wanted a perfume corresponding to its architectural style. The perfume is called translucence, corresponding to said aesthetic. Funnily, it's a modern bright floral with a fun fresh celery note.

    As for vorticism and futurism, how about dynamic perfumes like Feu d'Issey or Breath of God: every time one smells, there's something new popping up.

    cacio

    Thanks, Cacio. Great post!

    When you say Geza Schoen and the like, who else do you mean? And do you think his compositions for Ormonde Jayne fit into the minimalist category? Is CK One a minimalist perfume? I could almost see it being postmodern, though that may be the ad campaign I'm remembering.

    I'd agree about chypres being Art Deco. I can understand your impression. I think my problem is that I don't know enough about art movements to be articulate about any of this! Really fascinating, though.

    I think that in some ways, artistic movements are like the classifications of chemical reactions. Except for the most obvious, the only way to really be good at categorizing them is to have done quite a few categorizations already - to the point where it's second-nature.





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