Newb with questions

    Newb with questions

    post #1 of 23
    Thread Starter 

    Hello everyone, I have been lurking here for a few weeks and I have some questions.

    What is the difference between perfume and cologne ? Is perfume for women and cologne for men ?

    What does Pour Homme mean ? I see a lot of fragrances with Pour Homme

    What does flanker mean ?

    What is an atomizer ?

    How do you learn what notes are in a fragrance , Is there a list somewhere ?

    post #2 of 23

    Pour Homme = means For Men; opposite is Pour Femme

    As for Perfume and/or Cologne, personally, I find them interchangeable. But for majority of people I know, they think perfume is for women, and cologne is for men.

    I'll let the others answer the rest of your questions.

    Welcome to Basenotes!vrolijk_26.gif

    4509

    post #3 of 23
    Thread Starter 

    Del , Thank you .

    I had no idea cologne was going to be another expensive addicting hobby . Right now Im enjoying Dior Intense that I purchased today . Im 51 yrs old and have owned 3 bottles of cologne in my life , since I registered on this forum a week ago I now own 20 samples and 3 full bottles (Dior Intence , A Man malt , and 1 Million ) I have a list of about 20 others I like to own .

    post #4 of 23

    To add to what dell was saying, "cologne" is a term used in the united states, where many men would not even thing about getting anywhere near stuff that women use (perfume). But it's really the word used by some companies for perfumes marketed to men.

    There is also "Eau de Cologne", which is a more specific term: it refers to a low concentration of a fragrance (whether for men or for women), which however nowadays is not usually found (rather, one sees slightly higher concentrations like eau de toilette or eau de parfum).

    Finally, to add to the confusion, Eau de Cologne was originally a specific perfume recipe based on orange blossom/citrus (which was indeed low concentration). You still find eau de cologne in this sense (in some cases with the Italian name, Colonia).

    cacio

    post #5 of 23

    You're welcome, Mike!

    To continue, Flankers are just colognes named after a bottle. For example, there's Allure Homme by Chanel, and following that, Chanel released Allure Homme Sport, Allure Homme Edition Blanche, etc.... They follow the name of the original bottle. You'll read here on Basenotes that sometimes, a flanker can have a flanker, too. (eg. Allure Homme Sport Eau Extreme)

    @cacio, thanks for the extra knowledge!thumbup.gif

    4513

    post #6 of 23
    Thread Starter 

    Cacio thank you very much for that explanation , that clears up a lot for me . So the abrievations EDC, EDT, EDP that I have been seeing are strengths . So if I do come across something that is EDC should I stay away from it ? Is EDP stronger than EDT and would it cost more ?

    Del , I would have never figured out what Flanker was but it makes sense now , thank you . That is just crazy that a flanker could have a flanker .

    post #7 of 23

    Edc, edt, etc. do not refer to an absolute scale, so an edc of a perfume could actually be more concentrated than an edt of another perfume. More importantly, the strength of a perfume depends on the type of the ingredients used: some ingredients are very loud at minimal doses, and viceversa. So you shouldn't worry too much about this. Each perfume should be tested on its own to judge longevity and intensity.

    Besides, almost no perfume comes in different concentrations anymore, especially masculine ones. There's only one (for masculines typically corresponding to an edt). In the very few cases where this happens, we're more in the case of "flankers", because they are different in smell, it's not just a matter of concentration.

    There are still some feminines that come in different concentrations (especially for traditional brands like Chanel or Guerlain), and usually the edp is more intense than the edt. But in this case, again, also it's just not a matter of concentration, but the formulas are slightly different, typically edt have a fresher, lighter feel than the edp.

    cacio

    post #8 of 23

    Just to add a bit to del's comment about flankers: you can think of them as analogous to movie sequels. The studio or perfume house has invested lots and lots of money in publicizing a brand, and so it makes sense for them to introduce more products that take advantage of the name recognition they've already achieved. Also like movie sequels, flankers are typically related to their originals. This is especially clear in the A*Men flankers, which maintain the familiar A*Men backbone and add some interesting notes to the mix.

    post #9 of 23
    Thread Starter 

    Cacio , great information I appreciate the knowledge

    L' Incandescent so if you love the original there is a good chance you will like the flanker , or possibly like it better than the original . That is pretty cool but god this is going to get crazy . I better start working some overtime ....

    post #10 of 23
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mike 257View Post

    L' Incandescent so if you love the original there is a good chance you will like the flanker , or possibly like it better than the original . That is pretty cool but god this is going to get crazy . I better start working some overtime ....

    One of my online fragrance friends--I don't think he posts at BN--wrote something I still think was really insightful. A fragrance is like a combination lock: you can have it all right except for one number, which is off by just one, and that makes it completely wrong. In other words, one small addition can make the fragrance very different, to such an extent that you might love one and strongly dislike the other.

    post #11 of 23
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by L'IncandescentView Post

    A fragrance is like a combination lock: you can have it all right except for one number, which is off by just one, and that makes it completely wrong. In other words, one small addition can make the fragrance very different, to such an extent that you might love one and strongly dislike the other.
    That's a great comment!
    post #12 of 23
    As a newb with only one year's experience I think that it is all quite complicated. The main thing is that you need patience, curiosity, and cash. From what I've read, here and elsewhere, different formulations of the same scent are, well, different. What I mean is, some people prefer the EDC to the EDP, and some prefer the EDT over the other two. So, what I have determined is that it is best to sample first. For instance, I decided to buy samples of Coty Chypre in all three strengths, and found out that they are indeed different from one another. It is helpful to read opinions and reviews, but at the end of the day it is your nose that will make the final decision as to whether or not you'll buy the bottle.
    post #13 of 23
    Yes there is a lot of things to learn when new to this wonderful hobby. Everyone else is pretty much spot on. One thing i wanted to add is that you may see extrait, or pure parfum. These are even more concentrated than a EDP, and will have increased longevity (how long a fragrance lasts on your skin) and most likely less projection/sillage ( how much the scent permeates the air around you).
    post #14 of 23
    Thread Starter 
    Great info, thank you everyone for the responses. Ok now i know i have a problem since im checking this forum from my cell phone at work. Getting some comments from co workers today on how good i smell, wearing Dior Intense now.
    post #15 of 23

    Great to have you here, mike! And hopefully some of your questions have been answered. One thing I might add, go easy on buying the bottles right at first. You will like a lot of fragrances right now, but your taste may very well change as you sniff more and more of the vast amount of different fragrances out there. I love that you have a lot of samples, that is a great way to go at first. Once you have sampled something, over multiple wears, and you know you love it, then go for it.

    post #16 of 23
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by celloView Post

    Great to have you here, mike! And hopefully some of your questions have been answered. One thing I might add, go easy on buying the bottles right at first. You will like a lot of fragrances right now, but your taste may very well change as you sniff more and more of the vast amount of different fragrances out there. I love that you have a lot of samples, that is a great way to go at first. Once you have sampled something, over multiple wears, and you know you love it, then go for it.

    Great advice, Cello!!

    post #17 of 23
    Thread Starter 




Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000