What EOs/ACs do you LOVE… but find hard, and frustrating to use?

    What EOs/ACs do you LOVE… but find hard, and frustrating to use?

    post #1 of 19
    Thread Starter 

    I recently got some of the Birch Leaf from PA, and wow is that a pain to work with. I know it's a blend, but still…WOW!

    I've spent a lot of time trying to work that into something. And I'm sure, over time, I'll figure something out. But it got me thinking:

    Any note, or notes you really, really love on their own…but have a difficult time using in a practical sense?

    post #2 of 19

    So called 'Thyme oil white', which is essential oil traders slang for Oregano oil.

    Love it, but is very hard to use without having it taken over the fragrance.

    post #3 of 19
    Thread Starter 

    I'm actually having some issues with Clary Sage, too, lol. But then again I'm a newbie :)

    post #4 of 19

    I cannot smell Birch Tar without thinking of frankfurter sausages. It really puts me off it. I have it reduced to 0.1% and still I smell sausages. What does the Birch leaf smell like?

    post #5 of 19
    Birch leaf is green. Birch Tar is campfire smoke.
    post #6 of 19

    Homemade birch tar oil smells much better than the rectified oil that I bought. More cool in aroma, like diesel, cold, black leather, a steel works or an old bonfire.

    post #7 of 19

    I wonder... Hmm, I have some 1930 Birch Tar, that is MUCH tamer than the current Birch Tar rectified, I attributed this to aging and mellowing, but maybe it's something else too......?????????

    post #8 of 19

    Perhaps it was reserved back then because it happened to be a good vintage. The methods of distillation back then may also have been different, perhaps letting in less air or distilling at a lower temperature. I used an old bush craft method which lets in very little air but I also used charcoal as fuel, so the temperature would have been hotter than if using regular wood. I'd suspect that you're right about it having mellowed with time though. It happens with so many things; wine, essential oils etc, so why not birch tar?


    Edited by Pears - 8/23/13 at 10:13am
    post #9 of 19
    I find Fir Balsam AB and Pink Lotus hard as hell to use. Fir being hard to dissolve and
    pink lotus sticky and messy.
    post #10 of 19

    I like jasmine absolute at full strength but in my blends it smells like tomato sauce.

    post #11 of 19

    Java Vetiver. Love till death do us part, but he keeps ruining everything, no matter how or what I try. Lemons, bergamots, oranges, mints, cedars, patchoulis, pines and whole forests: he demands and consumes them all. And he smokes the whole time, while he singlehandedly eliminates everything else. I will never work it out, seems to me: he will keep on vandalizing everything, if I don't stop putting pressure on him to fit in a bottle with others. But then, a solinote, with him alone: that's mass extinction, been there, done that, almost got arrested for doing so. Only the synthetic Stemone could have helped me, but it helped too much: he just wasn't there anymore. Guess he'll only have it his way or no way.

    cry.gif

    post #12 of 19
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by flagellumView Post

    Java Vetiver. Love till death do us part, but he keeps ruining everything, no matter how or what I try.

    cry.gif

    Yes, I can remember it. I used it in a project years ago and after a while each and every test fragrance was vetiver only. The solution was however very basic: using less, I think used sometimes over 90% less. For I did not imediately think of this I dare to ask you if you thought of that (obvious) option? You are right: it is a great material.

    post #13 of 19

    I love the creamy scent that Benzoin adds but dissolving it is a real pain in the butt!

    post #14 of 19
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by janmeutView Post

    Yes, I can remember it. I used it in a project years ago and after a while each and every test fragrance was vetiver only. The solution was however very basic: using less, I think used sometimes over 90% less. For I did not imediately think of this I dare to ask you if you thought of that (obvious) option? You are right: it is a great material.

    Hi, Jan! And thank you for your answer. Yes, I actually have, and I tried. Just put some of that trial on my skin...some 25-30drops of Java Vetiver on a 10% dilution of Timbersilk / Iso (accounting for the 70% / 30% part of the 10% concentrate). 100 ml bottle. Ruined it. OK. Not quite.Smells good. Smells vetiver-y. But not very vetivery. Not so vetivery as I would have it. And that's the problem: whenever I get scared of vetiver, I drown him in a chemical, like calling an elephant Tweety and trying to hide him behind an iPhone. Don't. Not that you did, I am actually talking to myself and trying to heal my wounds, once again. As I said: it always smells good, but that's what vetiver does; he smells good. But since I am not Guerlain and since I can't afford/find all the fractions and substitutes and moleculesthey use, I will never be able to bring his real etherealdry earthy freshness on surface. It ends bitter or sad: too smoky, too heavy, too choking, too penetrant, or too vague, justdrowned, too submissive. And he sure is more worth than such a treatment. He is dominant, that's for sure, but he's also very smooth and comforting, dry and earthy, silent, brilliantly silent, like a smooth presence, an eternal witness. Very poetic for saying: a wonderful fixative.My instant brainless reflex to drown him in anything will always end bitter or sad, as I said. And I am at a loss.

    Sch€iße

    :cry:


    Edited by flagellum - 9/7/13 at 7:27pm
    post #15 of 19

    Vetiver is one of the most variable natural materials available.

    If you don't like one, try another from a different locale, or a different type of distillation/processing. Indonesian vetiver is particularly different (smoky) because of the distillation method, which is very different from the water borne hydrodistillationHaitian Style, and diff from other locale styles.

    Blending is indeed an art. Try a combination of vetivers, instead of just one. Blend around the vetiver with other rooty oils as well. Try the Vetiveryl Acetate, or Vetiverol in combination. Don't limit yourself this way, as it seem you may be doing, open up the doors of possibilities...

    post #16 of 19

    Ok, I adore vetiver. And Dill CO2; however this spice cranky. I try Dill CO2 in many variations, some successfull, some not... This stuff interesting, intriguing for me. But quickly shuts down the nonsense. Still looking for opportunities. But they fit to each other, so why not... My today's game: vetiver Sri Lanka 4 drops, Dill CO2 2, Tahiti vanilla CO2 1, Cedrus deodara 1, fresch Ginger 1, Guiacwood 50% in ethanol 2, Safraleine 20% 1, Norlimbanol 10% 2., 30 drops ethanol. Just my way of thinking and blending. Tiny simple accord.

    Woody-rooty-leathery vetiver. Not boring, not flat. Vetiver my beloved. If I add Jasmin Sambac (I try add on blotter, nice), or roses, or something like, I should had simplified perfum. Maybe too much Safraleine; it's would be enough 0.5 drop, or even without. Maybe I need mask something unpleasant from Dill in top note start, maybe it dissapears with time; don‘t know today...

    post #17 of 19
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pkilerView Post

    Vetiver is one of the most variable natural materials available.
    If you don't like one, try another from a different locale, or a different type of distillation/processing. Indonesian vetiver is particularly different (smoky) because of the distillation method, which is very different from the water borne hydrodistillationHaitian Style, and diff from other locale styles.

    Blending is indeed an art. Try a combination of vetivers, instead of just one. Blend around the vetiver with other rooty oils as well. Try the Vetiveryl Acetate, or Vetiverol in combination. Don't limit yourself this way, as it seem you may be doing, open up the doors of possibilities...

    Hi Paul and thank you for your answer. It really is all about the Java variety, at least that is my favorite vetiver. Vetiveryl acetate is a bit too nutty to me, I don't enjoy it that much, besides that's it's a bit too pricey for my needs. Last time I had some from PA I accidentally used ethanol and propylene instead of DIpropylene glycol to dilute. It stinks. And still I won't throw it away. Instead I threw the PG away. OK, I ruined it and must try again.

    I will try to mix with others: esp. Haiti/Salvador Vetiver (from the German Primavera). Last time I did, it smelled like old wine spilled on earth and leafs. Terribly boozy...I liked it. Accidentally some Exaltolide landed today morning on my arm, where the very diluted vetiver had dried. It smells great. Is it the Iso, reacting to Exalto? Is it the tiny amount of Vetiver compared to the flood of Iso, so he doesn't dominate? Is it only the Exalto and Vetiver?! I don't know. I always get the feeling: the musks could be my salvation and deliverance. I will try. I always try to keep it simple, but when has that ever been good?! Thanks anyway. Gonna try.
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    8/18/13 at 11:53am

    JungleNYC said:



    I recently got some of the Birch Leaf from PA, and wow is that a pain to work with. I know it's a blend, but still…WOW!

    I've spent a lot of time trying to work that into something. And I'm sure, over time, I'll figure something out. But it got me thinking:

    Any note, or notes you really, really love on their own…but have a difficult time using in a practical sense?

    8/20/13 at 10:56am

    janmeut said:



    So called 'Thyme oil white', which is essential oil traders slang for Oregano oil.

    Love it, but is very hard to use without having it taken over the fragrance.

    8/23/13 at 4:39am

    JungleNYC said:



    I'm actually having some issues with Clary Sage, too, lol. But then again I'm a newbie :)

    8/23/13 at 6:38am

    mumsy said:



    I cannot smell Birch Tar without thinking of frankfurter sausages. It really puts me off it. I have it reduced to 0.1% and still I smell sausages. What does the Birch leaf smell like?

    8/23/13 at 7:31am

    pkiler said:



    Birch leaf is green. Birch Tar is campfire smoke.

    8/23/13 at 8:27am

    Pears said:



    Homemade birch tar oil smells much better than the rectified oil that I bought. More cool in aroma, like diesel, cold, black leather, a steel works or an old bonfire.

    8/23/13 at 8:35am

    pkiler said:



    I wonder... Hmm, I have some 1930 Birch Tar, that is MUCH tamer than the current Birch Tar rectified, I attributed this to aging and mellowing, but maybe it's something else too......?????????

    8/23/13 at 9:38am

    Pears said:



    Perhaps it was reserved back then because it happened to be a good vintage. The methods of distillation back then may also have been different, perhaps letting in less air or distilling at a lower temperature. I used an old bush craft method which lets in very little air but I also used charcoal as fuel, so the temperature would have been hotter than if using regular wood. I'd suspect that you're right about it having mellowed with time though. It happens with so many things; wine, essential oils etc, so why not birch tar?


    Edited by Pears - 8/23/13 at 10:13am

    8/23/13 at 5:31pm

    Lady Vapour said:



    I find Fir Balsam AB and Pink Lotus hard as hell to use. Fir being hard to dissolve and
    pink lotus sticky and messy.

    8/23/13 at 7:27pm

    Alysoun said:



    I like jasmine absolute at full strength but in my blends it smells like tomato sauce.

    9/2/13 at 3:21pm

    flagellum said:



    Java Vetiver. Love till death do us part, but he keeps ruining everything, no matter how or what I try. Lemons, bergamots, oranges, mints, cedars, patchoulis, pines and whole forests: he demands and consumes them all. And he smokes the whole time, while he singlehandedly eliminates everything else. I will never work it out, seems to me: he will keep on vandalizing everything, if I don't stop putting pressure on him to fit in a bottle with others. But then, a solinote, with him alone: that's mass extinction, been there, done that, almost got arrested for doing so. Only the synthetic Stemone could have helped me, but it helped too much: he just wasn't there anymore. Guess he'll only have it his way or no way.

    cry.gif

    9/3/13 at 11:37am

    janmeut said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by flagellumView Post

    Java Vetiver. Love till death do us part, but he keeps ruining everything, no matter how or what I try.

    cry.gif

    Yes, I can remember it. I used it in a project years ago and after a while each and every test fragrance was vetiver only. The solution was however very basic: using less, I think used sometimes over 90% less. For I did not imediately think of this I dare to ask you if you thought of that (obvious) option? You are right: it is a great material.

    9/4/13 at 11:45am

    handy said:



    I love the creamy scent that Benzoin adds but dissolving it is a real pain in the butt!

    9/5/13 at 11:01am

    flagellum said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by janmeutView Post

    Yes, I can remember it. I used it in a project years ago and after a while each and every test fragrance was vetiver only. The solution was however very basic: using less, I think used sometimes over 90% less. For I did not imediately think of this I dare to ask you if you thought of that (obvious) option? You are right: it is a great material.

    Hi, Jan! And thank you for your answer. Yes, I actually have, and I tried. Just put some of that trial on my skin...some 25-30drops of Java Vetiver on a 10% dilution of Timbersilk / Iso (accounting for the 70% / 30% part of the 10% concentrate). 100 ml bottle. Ruined it. OK. Not quite.Smells good. Smells vetiver-y. But not very vetivery. Not so vetivery as I would have it. And that's the problem: whenever I get scared of vetiver, I drown him in a chemical, like calling an elephant Tweety and trying to hide him behind an iPhone. Don't. Not that you did, I am actually talking to myself and trying to heal my wounds, once again. As I said: it always smells good, but that's what vetiver does; he smells good. But since I am not Guerlain and since I can't afford/find all the fractions and substitutes and moleculesthey use, I will never be able to bring his real etherealdry earthy freshness on surface. It ends bitter or sad: too smoky, too heavy, too choking, too penetrant, or too vague, justdrowned, too submissive. And he sure is more worth than such a treatment. He is dominant, that's for sure, but he's also very smooth and comforting, dry and earthy, silent, brilliantly silent, like a smooth presence, an eternal witness. Very poetic for saying: a wonderful fixative.My instant brainless reflex to drown him in anything will always end bitter or sad, as I said. And I am at a loss.

    Sch€iße

    :cry:


    Edited by flagellum - 9/7/13 at 7:27pm

    9/5/13 at 11:18am

    pkiler said:



    Vetiver is one of the most variable natural materials available.

    If you don't like one, try another from a different locale, or a different type of distillation/processing. Indonesian vetiver is particularly different (smoky) because of the distillation method, which is very different from the water borne hydrodistillationHaitian Style, and diff from other locale styles.

    Blending is indeed an art. Try a combination of vetivers, instead of just one. Blend around the vetiver with other rooty oils as well. Try the Vetiveryl Acetate, or Vetiverol in combination. Don't limit yourself this way, as it seem you may be doing, open up the doors of possibilities...

    9/5/13 at 1:25pm

    Ramute said:



    Ok, I adore vetiver. And Dill CO2; however this spice cranky. I try Dill CO2 in many variations, some successfull, some not... This stuff interesting, intriguing for me. But quickly shuts down the nonsense. Still looking for opportunities. But they fit to each other, so why not... My today's game: vetiver Sri Lanka 4 drops, Dill CO2 2, Tahiti vanilla CO2 1, Cedrus deodara 1, fresch Ginger 1, Guiacwood 50% in ethanol 2, Safraleine 20% 1, Norlimbanol 10% 2., 30 drops ethanol. Just my way of thinking and blending. Tiny simple accord.

    Woody-rooty-leathery vetiver. Not boring, not flat. Vetiver my beloved. If I add Jasmin Sambac (I try add on blotter, nice), or roses, or something like, I should had simplified perfum. Maybe too much Safraleine; it's would be enough 0.5 drop, or even without. Maybe I need mask something unpleasant from Dill in top note start, maybe it dissapears with time; don‘t know today...

    9/6/13 at 6:32am

    flagellum said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pkilerView Post

    Vetiver is one of the most variable natural materials available.
    If you don't like one, try another from a different locale, or a different type of distillation/processing. Indonesian vetiver is particularly different (smoky) because of the distillation method, which is very different from the water borne hydrodistillationHaitian Style, and diff from other locale styles.

    Blending is indeed an art. Try a combination of vetivers, instead of just one. Blend around the vetiver with other rooty oils as well. Try the Vetiveryl Acetate, or Vetiverol in combination. Don't limit yourself this way, as it seem you may be doing, open up the doors of possibilities...

    Hi Paul and thank you for your answer. It really is all about the Java variety, at least that is my favorite vetiver. Vetiveryl acetate is a bit too nutty to me, I don't enjoy it that much, besides that's it's a bit too pricey for my needs. Last time I had some from PA I accidentally used ethanol and propylene instead of DIpropylene glycol to dilute. It stinks. And still I won't throw it away. Instead I threw the PG away. OK, I ruined it and must try again.

    I will try to mix with others: esp. Haiti/Salvador Vetiver (from the German Primavera). Last time I did, it smelled like old wine spilled on earth and leafs. Terribly boozy...I liked it. Accidentally some Exaltolide landed today morning on my arm, where the very diluted vetiver had dried. It smells great. Is it the Iso, reacting to Exalto? Is it the tiny amount of Vetiver compared to the flood of Iso, so he doesn't dominate? Is it only the Exalto and Vetiver?! I don't know. I always get the feeling: the musks could be my salvation and deliverance. I will try. I always try to keep it simple, but when has that ever been good?! Thanks anyway. Gonna try.





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