Cleaning Bottles

    Cleaning Bottles

    post #1 of 11
    Thread Starter 

    I purchased new bottles that I plan to use for storing dilutions, however, I would like to clean the bottles prior to using them to ensure they are free of contaminants. Two ideas I had for cleaning the bottles are:

    1. 190 proof alcohol
    2. Boiling in water bath

    Option 1 will result in me wasting the little alcohol I have for my dilutions, so option 2 seems like it might be best. Thoughts? How do all of you clean your bottles?

    What about the polycone lined caps? Can they be safely boiled?

    Thanks

    post #2 of 11

    I think that Chris Bartlett said that he had success by simply putting his glass containers in the dishwasher. It would probably be best to soak the plastic caps separately in a bowl of hot water with detergent.

    post #3 of 11
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PearsView Post

    I think that Chris Bartlett said that he had success by simply putting his glass containers in the dishwasher. It would probably be best to soak the plastic caps separately in a bowl of hot water with detergent.

    That is exactly what i do; glass bottles in the dishwasher at 70 degrees Celcius and the caps or sprayers in a jar + lit with hot water dishwasher detergent, shaken now and then and let them stand for 3 to 4 days. That way i can re-use bottles almost infinite and the caps/sprayers 3 to 4 times.

    No need for alcohol. Might you want to use alcohol, just a little is enough and you can use the same alcohol for many bottles. Certainly no need to use fresh alcohol for every bottle. After the last one, you can use the alcohol for your Millefleur ;-)

    Happy perfuming,

    Jeroen.

    post #4 of 11

    Washing bottles is fine but I find it difficult to get the bottles to completely dry on the inside. There are always a few drops of water left inside that won't dry. Some people say alcohol will get the water out but I have tried it and it does not work as far as I am concerned.

    I have used a microwave to get it to dry on the inside but it is a time-consuming part of my production and don't enjoy it at all. I have even tried using a hair dryer but that takes forever. I have also tried blowing it out with compressed air. As I work with a lot of bottle, it does not take long for the compressor to overheat.

    If anyone has a better way to get water out of a bottle, I'd really like to hear it.

    post #5 of 11
    I don't know if it would work but have you thought about using uncooked rice?
    post #6 of 11

    Interesting concept. Perhaps some other material would be more practical. Sort of like a blotter effect.

    post #7 of 11
    My dishwasher has a heated drying setting.
    post #8 of 11

    After you've washed and air-dried the bottles you can put them in a sealed container with dry rice or use a desiccant like damp-rid. Some desiccants can be slow baked in the oven and reused many times. I believe silica gel is the one that can be re-dried and re-used.

    post #9 of 11

    Maybe it can be convenient dry bottles, standing them on something like heating blanket? They will dry slowly, but without heavy labor. I dry in disches (cofee cups etc., about 40 Celsius) heating shelf.

    post #10 of 11
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JEBeasleyView Post

    After you've washed and air-dried the bottles you can put them in a sealed container with dry rice or use a desiccant like damp-rid. Some desiccants can be slow baked in the oven and reused many times. I believe silica gel is the one that can be re-dried and re-used.

    If you decide to use silica gel please find thesilica gel that is cobalt chloride free for health concerns considering you would be "recharging" the desiccants in your oven.

    post #11 of 11

    Thank you for that bit of information ScentlessApprentice! I did not know that was a consideration but that makes sense. Now that I know this is a concern I believe Damp Rid might be a horrible recommendation. I was able to easily find Cobalt Chloride free silica very easily on Amazon and other online stores so it is not difficult to find.

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    8/21/13 at 1:35pm

    ScentlessApprentice said:



    I purchased new bottles that I plan to use for storing dilutions, however, I would like to clean the bottles prior to using them to ensure they are free of contaminants. Two ideas I had for cleaning the bottles are:

    1. 190 proof alcohol
    2. Boiling in water bath

    Option 1 will result in me wasting the little alcohol I have for my dilutions, so option 2 seems like it might be best. Thoughts? How do all of you clean your bottles?

    What about the polycone lined caps? Can they be safely boiled?

    Thanks

    8/22/13 at 12:16pm

    Pears said:



    I think that Chris Bartlett said that he had success by simply putting his glass containers in the dishwasher. It would probably be best to soak the plastic caps separately in a bowl of hot water with detergent.

    8/23/13 at 12:08pm

    jsparla said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PearsView Post

    I think that Chris Bartlett said that he had success by simply putting his glass containers in the dishwasher. It would probably be best to soak the plastic caps separately in a bowl of hot water with detergent.

    That is exactly what i do; glass bottles in the dishwasher at 70 degrees Celcius and the caps or sprayers in a jar + lit with hot water dishwasher detergent, shaken now and then and let them stand for 3 to 4 days. That way i can re-use bottles almost infinite and the caps/sprayers 3 to 4 times.

    No need for alcohol. Might you want to use alcohol, just a little is enough and you can use the same alcohol for many bottles. Certainly no need to use fresh alcohol for every bottle. After the last one, you can use the alcohol for your Millefleur ;-)

    Happy perfuming,

    Jeroen.

    8/31/13 at 6:26pm

    TheBeat said:



    Washing bottles is fine but I find it difficult to get the bottles to completely dry on the inside. There are always a few drops of water left inside that won't dry. Some people say alcohol will get the water out but I have tried it and it does not work as far as I am concerned.

    I have used a microwave to get it to dry on the inside but it is a time-consuming part of my production and don't enjoy it at all. I have even tried using a hair dryer but that takes forever. I have also tried blowing it out with compressed air. As I work with a lot of bottle, it does not take long for the compressor to overheat.

    If anyone has a better way to get water out of a bottle, I'd really like to hear it.

    8/31/13 at 8:09pm

    kswer said:



    I don't know if it would work but have you thought about using uncooked rice?

    8/31/13 at 8:44pm

    TheBeat said:



    Interesting concept. Perhaps some other material would be more practical. Sort of like a blotter effect.

    8/31/13 at 9:43pm

    JPSully said:



    My dishwasher has a heated drying setting.

    9/1/13 at 12:16am

    JEBeasley said:



    After you've washed and air-dried the bottles you can put them in a sealed container with dry rice or use a desiccant like damp-rid. Some desiccants can be slow baked in the oven and reused many times. I believe silica gel is the one that can be re-dried and re-used.

    9/1/13 at 1:17am

    Ramute said:



    Maybe it can be convenient dry bottles, standing them on something like heating blanket? They will dry slowly, but without heavy labor. I dry in disches (cofee cups etc., about 40 Celsius) heating shelf.

    9/6/13 at 8:36am

    ScentlessApprentice said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JEBeasleyView Post

    After you've washed and air-dried the bottles you can put them in a sealed container with dry rice or use a desiccant like damp-rid. Some desiccants can be slow baked in the oven and reused many times. I believe silica gel is the one that can be re-dried and re-used.

    If you decide to use silica gel please find thesilica gel that is cobalt chloride free for health concerns considering you would be "recharging" the desiccants in your oven.

    9/6/13 at 10:15am

    JEBeasley said:



    Thank you for that bit of information ScentlessApprentice! I did not know that was a consideration but that makes sense. Now that I know this is a concern I believe Damp Rid might be a horrible recommendation. I was able to easily find Cobalt Chloride free silica very easily on Amazon and other online stores so it is not difficult to find.





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