Amber note

    Amber note

    post #1 of 12
    Thread Starter 
    Hi All,

    I would be interested to know your opinions on the characteristics of Amber notes. The reason for asking, is because I feel that a fragrance notes' quality is identified through how it 'smells', with different characteristics of the scent attributing it to the quality of the scent.

    Some of the Amber fragrance compound I have smells almost antiseptic to me -that TCP smell, with a warm 'edge' to it, if that makes sense! Do others feel the same and is this how the scent of this fragrance should be?
    post #2 of 12
    Amber in modern perfumery, at least the good quality, smells warm and glowing to me.
    It's reminiscent of a perfectly buffed mahogany table. No rough edges.
    post #3 of 12
    Amber varies in perfumery as it's hardly ever actual amber, but rather an artistic rendering of "amber" constructed from labdanum, benzoin, styrax, vanilla and a few other things. It's a bit like incense in perfume—it's not an extraction of incense (that would be impossible), but rather an artistic mock up of incense. Consequently, amber in perfumery can be all over the place, from cloyingly sweet, to resinous and woodsy, to oily and warm.

    Actual amber (CO2 extraction of fossilized conifer) smells a bit odd—slightly like burned rubber. It's also very expensive, so it doesn't get used much. One of the closest examples of amber (what you might call "reference" amber) is HdP's Ambre 114.
    post #4 of 12

    I fully agree with the other posters. Amber is such a generic term that it encompasses several materials and accords. But the main materials, per se, smell warmer and enveloping.

    So called woody ambers, which are modern synthetics overused in modern masculines, are a different story altogether and they do smell sharp and annoying to me, like hospital cleaners.

    cacio

    post #5 of 12
    Thread Starter 
    Thank you for the inputs and opinion. This is interesting.

    Since Amber accords seem to come in a variety, how would one differentiate between a good quality Amber fragrance compound and a bad quality one? One that I purchased recently has the warm notes towards the edges, but dry down is very reminiscent of antiseptic. Is this an indicator of a poorer quality oil?
    post #6 of 12
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ArabianSaffronView Post

    Thank you for the inputs and opinion. This is interesting.

    Since Amber accords seem to come in a variety, how would one differentiate between a good quality Amber fragrance compound and a bad quality one? One that I purchased recently has the warm notes towards the edges, but dry down is very reminiscent of antiseptic. Is this an indicator of a poorer quality oil?

    That is a good question, and I'm not certain I know. But you can create "amber" from a variety of materials, both inexpensive and expensive. It seems to me that the quality is largely subjective, dependent on what style of amber you enjoy, in addition to the blend and the way it's composed. For example, an arguably poor amber might be one that turns too close to baby powder (a common concern with amber accords) or cloying (too much vanilla/benzoin). So, whereas I find Amber Absolute to be excellent, it's not a true amber, but it's a great fragrance as opposed to Ambre Narguile which, to me, has little to do with amber at all—but people love it for its gourmand qualities. Price doesn't strike me as that big of a sign either as I personally find Arno Sorel's Ambre Solinote to be quite a respectable little number (I paid $5 for it), but I find Lubin's Akkad to be kind of dull.

    So again, I'm not entirely sure—but I'd guess it has more to do with personal preference and the quality of the blend.

    If you are curious about checking out actual amber in a scent, Matriarch's Ambre Vie has it (a largely referential amber similar to 114) as does Slumberhouse's now very rare "A" release. (The latter of which is "difficult.")
    post #7 of 12

    Hi all, happily-accidentally find place where I can talk about amber essential oi! This oil smells like quite typical amber accord, and I think that seller official deccription of oil was taken from other sources and added to site, and nobody take care about sniffing... However, the oil is worth of attention. Sweet, balsamic, rich and veeeery long lasting, just like finished amber accord. Without smoky notes (I have fossilized amber CO2, amber absolute and know about different ambers). I can't and don't want comment supplier quality, but with this amber oil I am in doubts for a long time. It is incredibly similar to this amber resin (diluted in ethanol).The resin is blend of few oils, powders and resins...

    post #8 of 12

    This whole amber thing is very confusing but I think I've finally figured it out. When I think "amber," I think fossilized amber which has a very deep phenolic resiny smell. I like to use it in my wood blends. A little goes a long way. "Ambra," according to some authors tends to be an accord made with labdanum, vanilla, etc. but can also refer to ambergris. My best emulation of ambergris is a solution of 2% ambroxan and a small amount of oak moss.

    post #9 of 12
    Amber is a very confusing topic in perfumery. Here's how I understand it:

    You have the sweet-resinous-balsamic-vanillic blend of essences referred to generally as amber. That's an accord, and I think it's made up primarily of labdanum and vanillin. The quality of that accord I think is very subjective, depending on how you like your amber. I like mine to be very smooth and sweet. But I've smelled it with more of a woody edge and in various interpretations. I read somewhere that it's thought that this accord gets its name from its color, not from any association with fossilized amber or ambergris.

    Amber is also often used as a descriptor for ambergris-type odorants like Ambroxan, Grisalva, Fixateur 505. In this case it would refer to an ambergris quality. Wood-ambers derive from this aspect, because the woody amber odorants like Karanal, Norlimbanol, etc. have an amber(gris) nuance (which is why something like Oxyoctaline Formate, a woody note that can have an olibanum effect and presumably an ambergris touch, is called amber formate on The Good Scents Company's page).

    Fossilized amber extract I had actually not heard of before I started lurking around basenotes regularly. Interesting!

    Thta's my 2 cents.
    post #10 of 12

    Amber to me is simply warm,cozy and powderey

    post #11 of 12
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hedonist222View Post

    It's reminiscent of a perfectly buffed mahogany table. No rough edges.
    Love the analogy!
    post #12 of 12
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hednicView Post

    Love the analogy!

    thanks hednic
    class="

    8/23/13 at 4:04am

    ArabianSaffron said:



    Hi All,

    I would be interested to know your opinions on the characteristics of Amber notes. The reason for asking, is because I feel that a fragrance notes' quality is identified through how it 'smells', with different characteristics of the scent attributing it to the quality of the scent.

    Some of the Amber fragrance compound I have smells almost antiseptic to me -that TCP smell, with a warm 'edge' to it, if that makes sense! Do others feel the same and is this how the scent of this fragrance should be?

    8/23/13 at 6:22am

    hedonist222 said:



    Amber in modern perfumery, at least the good quality, smells warm and glowing to me.
    It's reminiscent of a perfectly buffed mahogany table. No rough edges.

    8/23/13 at 3:05pm

    deadidol said:



    Amber varies in perfumery as it's hardly ever actual amber, but rather an artistic rendering of "amber" constructed from labdanum, benzoin, styrax, vanilla and a few other things. It's a bit like incense in perfume—it's not an extraction of incense (that would be impossible), but rather an artistic mock up of incense. Consequently, amber in perfumery can be all over the place, from cloyingly sweet, to resinous and woodsy, to oily and warm.

    Actual amber (CO2 extraction of fossilized conifer) smells a bit odd—slightly like burned rubber. It's also very expensive, so it doesn't get used much. One of the closest examples of amber (what you might call "reference" amber) is HdP's Ambre 114.

    8/23/13 at 7:52pm

    cacio said:



    I fully agree with the other posters. Amber is such a generic term that it encompasses several materials and accords. But the main materials, per se, smell warmer and enveloping.

    So called woody ambers, which are modern synthetics overused in modern masculines, are a different story altogether and they do smell sharp and annoying to me, like hospital cleaners.

    cacio

    8/25/13 at 12:24pm

    ArabianSaffron said:



    Thank you for the inputs and opinion. This is interesting.

    Since Amber accords seem to come in a variety, how would one differentiate between a good quality Amber fragrance compound and a bad quality one? One that I purchased recently has the warm notes towards the edges, but dry down is very reminiscent of antiseptic. Is this an indicator of a poorer quality oil?

    8/25/13 at 12:36pm

    deadidol said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ArabianSaffronView Post

    Thank you for the inputs and opinion. This is interesting.

    Since Amber accords seem to come in a variety, how would one differentiate between a good quality Amber fragrance compound and a bad quality one? One that I purchased recently has the warm notes towards the edges, but dry down is very reminiscent of antiseptic. Is this an indicator of a poorer quality oil?

    That is a good question, and I'm not certain I know. But you can create "amber" from a variety of materials, both inexpensive and expensive. It seems to me that the quality is largely subjective, dependent on what style of amber you enjoy, in addition to the blend and the way it's composed. For example, an arguably poor amber might be one that turns too close to baby powder (a common concern with amber accords) or cloying (too much vanilla/benzoin). So, whereas I find Amber Absolute to be excellent, it's not a true amber, but it's a great fragrance as opposed to Ambre Narguile which, to me, has little to do with amber at all—but people love it for its gourmand qualities. Price doesn't strike me as that big of a sign either as I personally find Arno Sorel's Ambre Solinote to be quite a respectable little number (I paid $5 for it), but I find Lubin's Akkad to be kind of dull.

    So again, I'm not entirely sure—but I'd guess it has more to do with personal preference and the quality of the blend.

    If you are curious about checking out actual amber in a scent, Matriarch's Ambre Vie has it (a largely referential amber similar to 114) as does Slumberhouse's now very rare "A" release. (The latter of which is "difficult.")

    9/2/13 at 12:42pm

    Ramute said:



    Hi all, happily-accidentally find place where I can talk about amber essential oi! This oil smells like quite typical amber accord, and I think that seller official deccription of oil was taken from other sources and added to site, and nobody take care about sniffing... However, the oil is worth of attention. Sweet, balsamic, rich and veeeery long lasting, just like finished amber accord. Without smoky notes (I have fossilized amber CO2, amber absolute and know about different ambers). I can't and don't want comment supplier quality, but with this amber oil I am in doubts for a long time. It is incredibly similar to this amber resin (diluted in ethanol).The resin is blend of few oils, powders and resins...

    9/10/13 at 7:37am

    James Peterson said:



    This whole amber thing is very confusing but I think I've finally figured it out. When I think "amber," I think fossilized amber which has a very deep phenolic resiny smell. I like to use it in my wood blends. A little goes a long way. "Ambra," according to some authors tends to be an accord made with labdanum, vanilla, etc. but can also refer to ambergris. My best emulation of ambergris is a solution of 2% ambroxan and a small amount of oak moss.

    9/20/13 at 7:27am

    edshepp said:



    Amber is a very confusing topic in perfumery. Here's how I understand it:

    You have the sweet-resinous-balsamic-vanillic blend of essences referred to generally as amber. That's an accord, and I think it's made up primarily of labdanum and vanillin. The quality of that accord I think is very subjective, depending on how you like your amber. I like mine to be very smooth and sweet. But I've smelled it with more of a woody edge and in various interpretations. I read somewhere that it's thought that this accord gets its name from its color, not from any association with fossilized amber or ambergris.

    Amber is also often used as a descriptor for ambergris-type odorants like Ambroxan, Grisalva, Fixateur 505. In this case it would refer to an ambergris quality. Wood-ambers derive from this aspect, because the woody amber odorants like Karanal, Norlimbanol, etc. have an amber(gris) nuance (which is why something like Oxyoctaline Formate, a woody note that can have an olibanum effect and presumably an ambergris touch, is called amber formate on The Good Scents Company's page).

    Fossilized amber extract I had actually not heard of before I started lurking around basenotes regularly. Interesting!

    Thta's my 2 cents.

    9/20/13 at 9:51am

    Tony T said:



    Amber to me is simply warm,cozy and powderey

    9/20/13 at 2:30pm

    hednic said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hedonist222View Post

    It's reminiscent of a perfectly buffed mahogany table. No rough edges.
    Love the analogy!

    9/20/13 at 10:55pm

    hedonist222 said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hednicView Post

    Love the analogy!

    thanks hednic





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