New from Olivier Durbano: Lapis Philosophorum

    New from Olivier Durbano: Lapis Philosophorum

    post #1 of 26
    Thread Starter 

    From extrait.it / NST:

    "Olivier Durbano will launch Lapis Philosophorum, the niche brand’s first fragrance not inspired by an actual gemstone. Lapis Philosophorum is the Latin term for the mythical philosopher’s stone."

     

    700


    Top: Calamus, Juniper, Rum, White Truffle, Grapefruit, Vinaccia (the pulp left over when grapes have been pressed)
    Heart: Frankincense from Oman, Mesquite, Ambergris, Menthol
    Base:
    Opoponax, Myrrh, Musk, Oak Moss

     


    I am looking at the notes and thinking, this looks like a mess, with the truffle and vine crud and menthol and the kitchen sink. But I hope someone tries it and reports back: Did the mess turn into gold? smiley.gif

     

    post #2 of 26
    Thanks for the info. Will be blindly adding this to my collection as soon as it becomes available in my area. Sounds interesting.
    post #3 of 26
    Oy Lapis is a stone. Maybe it's not a gem but it's definitely semiprecious.

    It's actually one of my favorite stones.

    I thought Hednic would've said something...
    post #4 of 26
    post #5 of 26
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hedonist222 View Post

    Oy Lapis is a stone. Maybe it's not a gem but it's definitely semiprecious.

    It's actually one of my favorite stones.

    I thought Hednic would've said something...
    Here I is!

    Love Lapis also. When I lived in Iran, made numerous treks to where it was sourced in neighboring Afghanistan. Best quality with an even blue color with gold flecks comes from the Bamiyan region in Afghanistan. Lesser quality with white streaks in the blue comes from Chile. Definitely a gemstone. Enough rambling on a subject that is close to my heart.
    Edited by hednic - 9/1/13 at 11:31am
    post #6 of 26
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hednic View Post

    Here I is!

    Love Lapis also. When I lived in Iran, made numerous treks to where it was sourced in neighboring Afghanistan. Best quality with an even blue color with gold flecks comes from the Bamiyan region in Afghanistan. Lesser quality with white streaks in the blue comes from Chile. Enough rambling on a subject that is close to my heart

    I bet you enjoyed those treks!

    I've seen a few of my mother's vintage jewelry that belonged to her grandmother change color. it aged like a living organism from deep vivid blue to a lighter pale hue.


    She recently ordered from Pakistan a few table tops that weigh about 90kg each. Just beautiful.
    post #7 of 26

    I'm wearing a necklace of old faience and lapis - lovely stuff!

    post #8 of 26
    Looks like this one is going to have its official debut in September of this year at the trade show in Florence, Italy
    post #9 of 26

    I have to say I think it sounds rather interesting... can't wait to test it!

    post #10 of 26
    I don't care much for the top notes but considering what he's done with Black Tourmaline, this is one to try.
    post #11 of 26
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gtsb View Post

    I have to say I think it sounds rather interesting... can't wait to test it!
    You can't wait to try it and I can't wait to buy it! I guess we're both excited!
    post #12 of 26

    Back when I was making jewelry, I had the chance to buy rough lapis from some fellows who had a rug store.  The mine in Afghanistan has been in operation since pretty much the dawn of time....at least long enough to provide material for King Tut's gold mask.   The fellows had a big beat up metal can filled with rough rock, with a lock on it, and which looked like it had been drop-kicked all the way from Afghanistan to the US.

     

    This was way back in the day, and the Afghans were managing to transport this material outside of the country for sale, in order to get money to buy guns to fight the Russians.   Big blue chunks of rough lapis, up to about the size of a softball and larger.   If I remember right, we were buying it from these fellows for $400 a pound.

     

    If you crack the material, and look at the broken surface, you'll see that it has a granular structure, and aside from the deep blue color, and the flecks of iron pyrite, the best quality material has a very fine grain, thus making it both denser and easier for it to take a good polish.

     

    Once cut into slices, having big slabs of this stuff to work with was a truly memorable experience. 

    post #13 of 26
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Birdboy48 View Post

    Back when I was making jewelry, I had the chance to buy rough lapis from some fellows who had a rug store.  The mine in Afghanistan has been in operation since pretty much the dawn of time....at least long enough to provide material for King Tut's gold mask.   The fellows had a big beat up metal can filled with rough rock, with a lock on it, and which looked like it had been drop-kicked all the way from Afghanistan to the US.

    This was way back in the day, and the Afghans were managing to transport this material outside of the country for sale, in order to get money to buy guns to fight the Russians.   Big blue chunks of rough lapis, up to about the size of a softball and larger.   If I remember right, we were buying it from these fellows for $400 a pound.

    If you crack the material, and look at the broken surface, you'll see that it has a granular structure, and aside from the deep blue color, and the flecks of iron pyrite, the best quality material has a very fine grain, thus making it both denser and easier for it to take a good polish.

    Once cut into slices, having big slabs of this stuff to work with was a truly memorable experience. 
    Did you actually do lapidary work on rough?
    post #14 of 26
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hednic View Post


    Did you actually do lapidary work on rough?

     

     

        You bet I did !   And it was a real treat, I can tell you!

     

        You could tell they were not using the most delicate methods of mining the stuff at that time, as there was some of the sort of fracturing that comes with dynamite.  But when all that you normally see are small cabs of the stuff, it came as a revelation to me just how large a slab you could get, once you sliced the stuff up with a diamond saw.

     

        Not that it should have been that big of a surprise though.   As I understand, there are places in Russia where they have big structural columns of the stuff.

     

         Getting a good final polish was difficult though.  You'd take it down to really fine sandpaper, things would look great, but when you took the final step of polishing it with polishing powder on a leather buff, then you'd suddenly get "orange peeling" that was a reflection of the individual piece's relative grain structure.

     

         I suspect there's a trick to avoiding that, but I never quite figured it out.    As I understand, the material is akin to marble, in that sometimes, if you go to marble supply rooms,  you'll see huge slabs of material for marble countertops that have streaks of lapis in it.

     

         If I had the chance to buy rough again, I'd pay closer attention to the nature of exterior of the chunks.  A smoother fracture surface probably reflects a finer grain structure and a higher grade of material.

     

         But yes : Just having the opportunity to see big deep blue raw chunks of the stuff, as big as your fist or bigger, with the pyrites sparkling on the surface...it was nice alright.

    post #15 of 26
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Birdboy48 View Post


        You bet I did !   And it was a real treat, I can tell you!

        You could tell they were not using the most delicate methods of mining the stuff at that time, as there was some of the sort of fracturing that comes with dynamite.  But when all that you normally see are small cabs of the stuff, it came as a revelation to me just how large a slab you could get, once you sliced the stuff up with a diamond saw.

        Not that it should have been that big of a surprise though.   As I understand, there are places in Russia where they have big structural columns of the stuff.

         Getting a good final polish was difficult though.  You'd take it down to really fine sandpaper, things would look great, but when you took the final step of polishing it with polishing powder on a leather buff, then you'd suddenly get "orange peeling" that was a reflection of the individual piece's relative grain structure.

         I suspect there's a trick to avoiding that, but I never quite figured it out.    As I understand, the material is akin to marble, in that sometimes, if you go to marble supply rooms,  you'll see huge slabs of material for marble countertops that have streaks of lapis in it.

         If I had the chance to buy rough again, I'd pay closer attention to the nature of exterior of the chunks.  A smoother fracture surface probably reflects a finer grain structure and a higher grade of material.

         But yes : Just having the opportunity to see big deep blue raw chunks of the stuff, as big as your fist or bigger, with the pyrites sparkling on the surface...it was nice alright.
    So I see we both share a past skill!
    post #16 of 26
    Now available at Luckyscent and ready to ship!
    post #17 of 26 class="

    9/1/13 at 3:32am

    furrypine said:



    From extrait.it / NST:

    "Olivier Durbano will launch Lapis Philosophorum, the niche brand’s first fragrance not inspired by an actual gemstone. Lapis Philosophorum is the Latin term for the mythical philosopher’s stone."

     

    700


    Top: Calamus, Juniper, Rum, White Truffle, Grapefruit, Vinaccia (the pulp left over when grapes have been pressed)
    Heart: Frankincense from Oman, Mesquite, Ambergris, Menthol
    Base:
    Opoponax, Myrrh, Musk, Oak Moss

     


    I am looking at the notes and thinking, this looks like a mess, with the truffle and vine crud and menthol and the kitchen sink. But I hope someone tries it and reports back: Did the mess turn into gold? smiley.gif

     

    9/1/13 at 6:29am

    hednic said:



    Thanks for the info. Will be blindly adding this to my collection as soon as it becomes available in my area. Sounds interesting.

    9/1/13 at 6:35am

    hedonist222 said:



    Oy Lapis is a stone. Maybe it's not a gem but it's definitely semiprecious.

    It's actually one of my favorite stones.

    I thought Hednic would've said something...

    9/1/13 at 10:59am

    hednic said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hedonist222 View Post

    Oy Lapis is a stone. Maybe it's not a gem but it's definitely semiprecious.

    It's actually one of my favorite stones.

    I thought Hednic would've said something...
    Here I is!

    Love Lapis also. When I lived in Iran, made numerous treks to where it was sourced in neighboring Afghanistan. Best quality with an even blue color with gold flecks comes from the Bamiyan region in Afghanistan. Lesser quality with white streaks in the blue comes from Chile. Definitely a gemstone. Enough rambling on a subject that is close to my heart.
    Edited by hednic - 9/1/13 at 11:31am

    9/1/13 at 11:37am

    hedonist222 said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hednic View Post

    Here I is!

    Love Lapis also. When I lived in Iran, made numerous treks to where it was sourced in neighboring Afghanistan. Best quality with an even blue color with gold flecks comes from the Bamiyan region in Afghanistan. Lesser quality with white streaks in the blue comes from Chile. Enough rambling on a subject that is close to my heart

    I bet you enjoyed those treks!

    I've seen a few of my mother's vintage jewelry that belonged to her grandmother change color. it aged like a living organism from deep vivid blue to a lighter pale hue.


    She recently ordered from Pakistan a few table tops that weigh about 90kg each. Just beautiful.

    9/1/13 at 11:53am

    lpp said:



    I'm wearing a necklace of old faience and lapis - lovely stuff!

    9/1/13 at 12:32pm

    hednic said:



    Looks like this one is going to have its official debut in September of this year at the trade show in Florence, Italy

    9/2/13 at 6:39pm

    gtsb said:



    I have to say I think it sounds rather interesting... can't wait to test it!

    9/2/13 at 8:55pm

    Diamondflame said:



    I don't care much for the top notes but considering what he's done with Black Tourmaline, this is one to try.

    9/3/13 at 7:13am

    hednic said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gtsb View Post

    I have to say I think it sounds rather interesting... can't wait to test it!
    You can't wait to try it and I can't wait to buy it! I guess we're both excited!

    9/3/13 at 1:09pm

    Birdboy48 said:



    Back when I was making jewelry, I had the chance to buy rough lapis from some fellows who had a rug store.  The mine in Afghanistan has been in operation since pretty much the dawn of time....at least long enough to provide material for King Tut's gold mask.   The fellows had a big beat up metal can filled with rough rock, with a lock on it, and which looked like it had been drop-kicked all the way from Afghanistan to the US.

     

    This was way back in the day, and the Afghans were managing to transport this material outside of the country for sale, in order to get money to buy guns to fight the Russians.   Big blue chunks of rough lapis, up to about the size of a softball and larger.   If I remember right, we were buying it from these fellows for $400 a pound.

     

    If you crack the material, and look at the broken surface, you'll see that it has a granular structure, and aside from the deep blue color, and the flecks of iron pyrite, the best quality material has a very fine grain, thus making it both denser and easier for it to take a good polish.

     

    Once cut into slices, having big slabs of this stuff to work with was a truly memorable experience. 

    9/4/13 at 8:08pm

    hednic said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Birdboy48 View Post

    Back when I was making jewelry, I had the chance to buy rough lapis from some fellows who had a rug store.  The mine in Afghanistan has been in operation since pretty much the dawn of time....at least long enough to provide material for King Tut's gold mask.   The fellows had a big beat up metal can filled with rough rock, with a lock on it, and which looked like it had been drop-kicked all the way from Afghanistan to the US.

    This was way back in the day, and the Afghans were managing to transport this material outside of the country for sale, in order to get money to buy guns to fight the Russians.   Big blue chunks of rough lapis, up to about the size of a softball and larger.   If I remember right, we were buying it from these fellows for $400 a pound.

    If you crack the material, and look at the broken surface, you'll see that it has a granular structure, and aside from the deep blue color, and the flecks of iron pyrite, the best quality material has a very fine grain, thus making it both denser and easier for it to take a good polish.

    Once cut into slices, having big slabs of this stuff to work with was a truly memorable experience. 
    Did you actually do lapidary work on rough?

    9/4/13 at 8:55pm

    Birdboy48 said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hednic View Post


    Did you actually do lapidary work on rough?

     

     

        You bet I did !   And it was a real treat, I can tell you!

     

        You could tell they were not using the most delicate methods of mining the stuff at that time, as there was some of the sort of fracturing that comes with dynamite.  But when all that you normally see are small cabs of the stuff, it came as a revelation to me just how large a slab you could get, once you sliced the stuff up with a diamond saw.

     

        Not that it should have been that big of a surprise though.   As I understand, there are places in Russia where they have big structural columns of the stuff.

     

         Getting a good final polish was difficult though.  You'd take it down to really fine sandpaper, things would look great, but when you took the final step of polishing it with polishing powder on a leather buff, then you'd suddenly get "orange peeling" that was a reflection of the individual piece's relative grain structure.

     

         I suspect there's a trick to avoiding that, but I never quite figured it out.    As I understand, the material is akin to marble, in that sometimes, if you go to marble supply rooms,  you'll see huge slabs of material for marble countertops that have streaks of lapis in it.

     

         If I had the chance to buy rough again, I'd pay closer attention to the nature of exterior of the chunks.  A smoother fracture surface probably reflects a finer grain structure and a higher grade of material.

     

         But yes : Just having the opportunity to see big deep blue raw chunks of the stuff, as big as your fist or bigger, with the pyrites sparkling on the surface...it was nice alright.

    9/5/13 at 6:16am

    hednic said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Birdboy48 View Post


        You bet I did !   And it was a real treat, I can tell you!

        You could tell they were not using the most delicate methods of mining the stuff at that time, as there was some of the sort of fracturing that comes with dynamite.  But when all that you normally see are small cabs of the stuff, it came as a revelation to me just how large a slab you could get, once you sliced the stuff up with a diamond saw.

        Not that it should have been that big of a surprise though.   As I understand, there are places in Russia where they have big structural columns of the stuff.

         Getting a good final polish was difficult though.  You'd take it down to really fine sandpaper, things would look great, but when you took the final step of polishing it with polishing powder on a leather buff, then you'd suddenly get "orange peeling" that was a reflection of the individual piece's relative grain structure.

         I suspect there's a trick to avoiding that, but I never quite figured it out.    As I understand, the material is akin to marble, in that sometimes, if you go to marble supply rooms,  you'll see huge slabs of material for marble countertops that have streaks of lapis in it.

         If I had the chance to buy rough again, I'd pay closer attention to the nature of exterior of the chunks.  A smoother fracture surface probably reflects a finer grain structure and a higher grade of material.

         But yes : Just having the opportunity to see big deep blue raw chunks of the stuff, as big as your fist or bigger, with the pyrites sparkling on the surface...it was nice alright.
    So I see we both share a past skill!

    9/26/13 at 7:06pm

    hednic said:



    Now available at Luckyscent and ready to ship!





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