Is Parfumerie Générale also a house of knock-offs?

    Is Parfumerie Générale also a house of knock-offs?

    post #1 of 18
    Thread Starter 

    Ok, now that I got your attention with this hyperbolic question, let me first state that I am so glad PG exists, and that Pierre Guillaume is talented and hot.

    I also think that Cozé was groundbreaking, that Ombre Fauve is genius, and that secretely somewhere I long for Cèdre Sandaraque. Cadjméré is totally bottle-worthy. And I don't even have a sweet tooth.

    But...what do we make of Bois de Copaïba, Papyrus de Ciane, and another one I can't remember the name of? I mean, puleeeze, I'll take--in same order-- : L'Heure Bleue, Vent Vert, and Madame de Rochas. Should I think that these scents I'm talking about are at least an "homage" of the named venerable classics? Now, some of these PG fragrances are really good, some might say even actually *better* than their alleged correspondents in their current formulations...

    PS: I revisited the entire PG range at Osswald's downtown NY. Great store.


    Edited by jblanch1 - 9/12/13 at 4:54pm
    post #2 of 18

    Agree to PG being talented, brand as such is a bit under-rated imho. Glad to be owning some excellent parfums from this house...

    As for the knock off aspect - can't comment much - but invariably, any new parfum, be it from PG or any other brand / parfumeur, is going to share some aspects from a previous fragrance - whether it was intended to be such is the question that only PG can answer...

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jblanch1View Post

    I am so glad PG exists, and that Pierre Guillaume is talented and hot.

    Do you agree with me that these scents I'm talking about are at least an "homage" of the named venerable classics? What is the thin line between evoking and, well...


    Edited by badarun - 9/12/13 at 5:10pm
    post #3 of 18
    PG is a wonderful house IMO with many excellent fragrances. I personally don't buy the the "Knockoff" label regarding this house
    post #4 of 18

    I've never really thought of them as having knock-offs either, really. But Guillaume's extraordinarily prolific, so between PG, Huitieme Art, and Phaedon, there's bound to be some overlap.

    post #5 of 18
    I like their stuff and haven't seen any overt copy-catting, at least from what I've tried (though Corps et Ames is similar to Bandit, no bad thing). But I haven't found anything from PG that I love. I'll retry 'em.
    post #6 of 18

    I own/have tried Aomassai, Cologne Grand Siciele, Harmatan Noir, and Cadjmere and none smell like copycats of anything else I've smelled (although Cologne Grand Siciele is very similar to dozens of yummy classic colognes). This is a house I would like to explore more than any other (i.e., shameless reference to Wanted List).

    post #7 of 18

    I don't get the copycat in the ones you mention, and I wish I did, because they all smell kind of herbal-spicy resiny to me.

    But I like others of the house: Patchouli intrigant is a fun dirty patch, and Cuir venenum is as fun and strange as it get. I agree with Turin's comparison to beer, but to me not a Leffe but a lambic.

    cacio

    post #8 of 18

    I have only tried PG's more feminine offerings, but definitely noticed a similarity to Shalimar in Felanilla's drydown. I don't view this as a 'knock-off' though as much as PG just drawing some modern inspiration from one of the Greats. If it smelled exactly like Shalimar, that would be different of course. I haven't tried the other fragrances you mentioned though so can't comment on those.

    post #9 of 18
    There's one that smells very similar to Tuberose Criminelle.
    post #10 of 18
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by WingieView Post

    I have only tried PG's more feminine offerings, but definitely noticed a similarity to Shalimar in Felanilla's drydown. I don't view this as a 'knock-off' though as much as PG just drawing some modern inspiration from one of the Greats. If it smelled exactly like Shalimar, that would be different of course. I haven't tried the other fragrances you mentioned though so can't comment on those.

    I've heard that, and I get it. Both have a strong vanilla component in the dry down, but the drydown of Felanilla is sort of Guerlinade-ish really. I could image a Shalimar flanker smelling like that in the later phases.

    The really cool thing about Felanilla is that really unique vanilla-iris-green accord in the beginning. Turin says it's banana-like, and I get that. I think it includes some esters that are in banana, but it's not very literal to me. There's nothing else like it to me.

    The other PG I have is Cuir d'Iris, which is also very unique. I haven't explored the rest much.

    post #11 of 18
    I've never heard about the 'knock off' suspicions and I wouldn't agree. I have Cadjmere and the original Corps et Ames and really think PG does some interesting and unique stuff.

    I thought that Bois de Copaiba smelled like Cuir Mauresque!
    post #12 of 18

    I fell madly in love with PG after being give a sample of Iris Oriental.

    Tried and sample quite a few, I did not get the knock off vibe. BUT, then again I have a habit of trying something and thinking, "Oh that reminds me of????????". I do it with every fragrance I test. Now to others they may not smell alike at all!!!! But hey that is me.

    I bought FB of:

    Iris Oriental(two bottles)

    Louanges Profanes

    Cuir D'Iris

    Tonkamande

    Large decant of Praline de Santal(now this one does have SL Jeux de Peau vibe, but it could be the same sandalwood used).

    Huitieme Art

    FB

    Ambre Ceruleen (Blind Buy)

    Naivirius (Blind Buy)

    Loved both.

    Myrrhiad which I had sampled.

    But then as history tells us, nothing really is new now.

    post #13 of 18

    No. IMO, this house has quality anduniqueness. I'm a fan...

    post #14 of 18
    Thread Starter 
    Thanks to everyone for the input.

    In retrospect, I realize I did not formulate my post very well. If you bear with me that a *few* PG scents are inspired by well-known classics (smell Bois de Copa/ l'Heure bleue, it's pretty remarkable), I was curious to know what makes such a talented perfumer want to riff on such scents. Is it a demonstration of virtuosity where you show your capacity to integrate a winning formula while tweaking it a bit? Or is it because everything somehow has been said already, and there are so many things you can do with a certain ingredient (like galbanum for PdeC and VV)? Again, I'm a fan of the PG.
    post #15 of 18
    I need to try Bois de Copaiba. I'm curious now.
    post #16 of 18

    I haven't had the pleasure of trying any of this line, but when I see (on Fragrantica) the other fragrances they are voted as similar to, I am confident that I will like much of this line.

    post #17 of 18

    I have always been impressed with Parfumerie Generale - I have liked virtually all the scents I have triedfrom the line. It has not struck me that any might be knock offs at all.

    post #18 of 18