Any Tips for Re-emulsifying Body Lotion?

    Any Tips for Re-emulsifying Body Lotion?

    post #1 of 9
    Thread Starter 

    I figured if anyone would know, if would be the DIY-ers...

    I bought a bottle of vintage (it's not THAT old) perfumed body lotion, and the stuff seems to have de-emulsified. I wondered if there is any way I could re-emulsify this? Would gently heating it help at all? Would I end up evaporating off the scent?

    Any tips would be welcome. It's unused, smells great and I hate to throw it out.

    post #2 of 9

    you can try to add more emulsifier to the lotion to enhance emulsion. Might be best to use the emulsifier used originally in the lotion, if you can identify it from the list of ingredients.

    post #3 of 9

    There is no good option to re-emulsify a cream (either solid or liquid), an emulsion starts to separate at the day it is made and besides finding a better formulation to start with (which will delay the proces) there is very little you can do.

    post #4 of 9

    Try gently heating it with some self-emulsifying wax, then using a sterile stick blender...it might work, depending upon how much the oils have broken down.

    post #5 of 9
    Thread Starter 

    SylviaG - This sounds like a plan... I have some good beeswax (that might work). I will try some gentle heat, a little wax, mix it well, and see what happens. Fingers crossed!

    post #6 of 9

    I know nothing about body lotions but I know cooking. My suggestion is to take a bit and try the method(s) instead of taking one shot at the whole container.

    post #7 of 9

    Thank you - definitely excellent advice for any experiment, Master-Classster!

    post #8 of 9

    Beeswax is a rather weak emulsifier, if it works for you that's great, but if it's not working, there are emulsifying wax, sodium stearate, ceteareth-20, olivem-1000, etc. Check out: http://www.lotioncrafter.com/lotioncrafter-premium-ingredients-emulsifiers/

    post #9 of 9

    Emulsification need a given temperature, most emulsifiers work about 70C degree, so for low temperatures you need special, "cold" emulsifier; and you don't tell us that emulsifier was used in lotion. Some are not compatible with each other, so you can't put in any available emulsifier. Quite often emulsions don't forms, then changes proportions between ingredients. When heated, they lost about 5-10percent water, so you need compensate this amount. If you try heat and mix few ml, like you recieved good advice, and see that emulsion don't formed - add little distilled water, or hydrosol, and mix again.


    Many good info you can find in this blog: http://swiftcraftymonkey.blogspot.com/2012/02/emulsifiers-check-what-youve-got.html

    But be carefull, please, test product in small skin area. It can be harmful for you skin. I can't garantee, that such product can be safe. We don't eat changed food, so...

    Beeswax is not emulsifier; it is thickener.

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    9/22/13 at 9:52am

    bamboogrrrl said:



    I figured if anyone would know, if would be the DIY-ers...

    I bought a bottle of vintage (it's not THAT old) perfumed body lotion, and the stuff seems to have de-emulsified. I wondered if there is any way I could re-emulsify this? Would gently heating it help at all? Would I end up evaporating off the scent?

    Any tips would be welcome. It's unused, smells great and I hate to throw it out.

    9/22/13 at 6:05pm

    ariodant said:



    you can try to add more emulsifier to the lotion to enhance emulsion. Might be best to use the emulsifier used originally in the lotion, if you can identify it from the list of ingredients.

    9/23/13 at 10:28am

    janmeut said:



    There is no good option to re-emulsify a cream (either solid or liquid), an emulsion starts to separate at the day it is made and besides finding a better formulation to start with (which will delay the proces) there is very little you can do.

    9/23/13 at 12:29pm

    SylviaG said:



    Try gently heating it with some self-emulsifying wax, then using a sterile stick blender...it might work, depending upon how much the oils have broken down.

    9/24/13 at 12:59pm

    bamboogrrrl said:



    SylviaG - This sounds like a plan... I have some good beeswax (that might work). I will try some gentle heat, a little wax, mix it well, and see what happens. Fingers crossed!

    9/24/13 at 1:12pm

    Master-Classter said:



    I know nothing about body lotions but I know cooking. My suggestion is to take a bit and try the method(s) instead of taking one shot at the whole container.

    9/24/13 at 1:14pm

    lpp said:



    Thank you - definitely excellent advice for any experiment, Master-Classster!

    9/24/13 at 2:50pm

    ariodant said:



    Beeswax is a rather weak emulsifier, if it works for you that's great, but if it's not working, there are emulsifying wax, sodium stearate, ceteareth-20, olivem-1000, etc. Check out: http://www.lotioncrafter.com/lotioncrafter-premium-ingredients-emulsifiers/

    9/25/13 at 12:23am

    Ramute said:



    Emulsification need a given temperature, most emulsifiers work about 70C degree, so for low temperatures you need special, "cold" emulsifier; and you don't tell us that emulsifier was used in lotion. Some are not compatible with each other, so you can't put in any available emulsifier. Quite often emulsions don't forms, then changes proportions between ingredients. When heated, they lost about 5-10percent water, so you need compensate this amount. If you try heat and mix few ml, like you recieved good advice, and see that emulsion don't formed - add little distilled water, or hydrosol, and mix again.


    Many good info you can find in this blog: http://swiftcraftymonkey.blogspot.com/2012/02/emulsifiers-check-what-youve-got.html

    But be carefull, please, test product in small skin area. It can be harmful for you skin. I can't garantee, that such product can be safe. We don't eat changed food, so...

    Beeswax is not emulsifier; it is thickener.





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