What does "oud" smell like

    What does "oud" smell like

    post #1 of 31
    Thread Starter 

    Ok - somewhat new to this and the flavor of the month seems to be something with oud in it. So what does oud bring to the party? - Is is some sort of "animalic" musky smell - or what?

    Thanks

    post #2 of 31
    To me it smells of damp rotted wood that's been sitting for quite a while.
    post #3 of 31

    I get mostly damp wood, not too much of the rot though. Just a different smell. Definitely not like cedar or anything like that, if you're comparing to something in the woody category.

    post #4 of 31
    Thread Starter 

    Huh - so its kind of like an underlying scent with something else on top to balance it and add depth - when done well (?)

    So this is sort of the new "moss" in scents :)

    post #5 of 31

    There appear to be various scents that are used as oud in perfumery - often appearing as a very woody note (Tom Ford Oud Wood, Dior Leather Oud) or a bandaid scent (Montales, Tom Ford Noir De Noir). The consensus seems to be that real oud oil is not used in most mainstream frags.

    Real oud oil also varies considerably in scent. This depends on type of agarwood used, distillation methods, age, whether it is cultivated (inoculated) or wild (old and naturally infected), and the geographical source of the wood used. Pure oud oil can be woody, animalic, sweet, fruity, floral and/or resinous depending on the above factors.

    So whether you are smelling artificial or natural oud - there is great variation :)

    post #6 of 31

    Sort of like asking 'What does woody smell like?'. The answer is very complex, multi-layered and different, depending on whom you're talking to.

    post #7 of 31
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mikeperez23View Post

    Sort of like asking 'What does woody smell like?'. The answer is very complex, multi-layered and different, depending on whom you're talking to.

    Truly there is no right or wrong answer..

    Try to get a sample of M7 which started the whole (OUD) Craze

    post #8 of 31
    There's no way to describe what oud smells like. Every house's attempt is different, and all the distilled pure oils are different. It is it's own olfactory world. You'll have to explore for yourself. Just remember, no oud composition smells like pure oil at all.
    post #9 of 31

    As others have said, oud smells vary a lot, depending on the quality, variety, and how it's used (oil or smoked)-and in the same way, western oud reconstructions vary a lot depending on the model. Our Arabian BNers can elaborate on this.

    Oud is combination of woody notes (including wet, rotting wood), animalic dirty notes (some Indian ouds are at times described as fecal), strangely mineralic notes, and sweety fruity (not in the smoked form), or smoky leathery (in smoked form) ones. Sometimes the combination comes across as having a distinct band-aid note, as others said.

    Try to smell your way around. Tom Ford Oud wood touches on most of these notes and gives some ideas, even if it is not necessarily the most distinctive one. Dior leather oud is a good example of smoked oud.

    cacio

    post #10 of 31

    Oud is of course a woody note, but I've always thought of that association of the 'fresh/new plaster' coming out of its wrapper (by plaster I mean the fabric or plastic sticky strip that you put on your skin after a cut). I could be wrong, but there are so many oud scents (vast majority are synthetic given the high cost of this note)out there which are blended with other notes, it's hard to tell exactly. Oud is surprisingly good to blend with other notes.

    post #11 of 31
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tony TView Post

    Truly there is no right or wrong answer..

    Try to get a sample of M7 which started the whole (OUD) Craze

    You make a very valid point Tony. But I would add here though that M7 was the first western oud. The note has been used in Middle Eastern/Asian perfumes for centuries. It's only since YSL put M7 together that it became more well known to the west. Now it seems everyone under the sun wants to release an oud scent!

    post #12 of 31

    What a great question! I've smelled a number of synthetic ouds, and they have ranged from gasolinic to mildewy to straight up woody.

    post #13 of 31

    It's rot -- literally

    post #14 of 31

    I think it's a defense mechanism to mold that releases aromatics, from what I've read, rather than rot. It's very rare because only a few agarwood trees act in this manor. A nice article was written here that gives more detail about oud. Actually, our fellow Basenoter, Mike

    Perez is quoted in the article!

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KaernView Post

    It's rot -- literally

    post #15 of 31
    Thread Starter 

    Thanks everyone - great info and assistance in fleshing out this oud concept for me :beer:

    post #16 of 31
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rynegneView Post

    I think it's a defense mechanism to mold that releases aromatics, from what I've read, rather than rot. It's very rare because only a few agarwood trees act in this manor. A nice article was written here that gives more detail about oud. Actually, our fellow Basenoter, Mike

    Perez is quoted in the article!

    This is correct and what I thought it was as well. The fact that only 2% (or something like that) of theAquilaria and Gyrinops trees produce this/behave like this are what makes oud so expensive. There is also a very good Wikipedia article on oud if you look it up... think it's this one:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agarwood

    post #17 of 31

    Just keep in mind that the majority of oud fragrances on the market have never seen a drop oud in them at any point. The material has so much variance and natural idiosyncrasy that it can be difficult to control the overall perfume profile. Also, synthetic oud is relatively cheap, which is perfect for mass-marketed scents. If you're looking at scents like TF's Oud Wood, MFK's oud, Bond, Kilian,M7 etc., you're dealing with a chemical knock-offof oud (which arguably can smell more stable), but if you want to try actual oud, take a look at Phoenecia's Realoud, Xerjoff's recent Oud Luban, or even MdO's Oud to get a sense of how challenging the material can be.

    post #18 of 31
    Thread Starter 




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