What am I smelling?

    What am I smelling?

    post #1 of 5
    Thread Starter 

    I am a new member to Basenotes, but have been reading for a long time and am a huge fan.My loveof perfume that goes way back, and started with Chanel No. 19.

    My brother was a Taxi driver in the eighties, and was taking some young ladies to their destination. He asked politely "What perfume are you wearing? It smells amazing". One said Chanel 19, one said Beautiful and the other said Youth Dew.

    On my 19th birthday, 1985, he forked out $95 and bought me Estee Lauder Beautiful as a gift and soon after that, Chanel No 19 ParfumExtrait. I was so excited, and we have both since then, enjoyed our mutual passion for amazing fragrances. He spoils his wife, and I keep promising my husband that this is definitely the last bottle I am buying. . . (yeah, sure!)

    I know what I love (my obsession at the moment is Vintage Dioressence - circa 1970's bottle) I have two full ones and one half.

    But I am a real novice at picking out notes, for example, what oakmoss, or iris actually smell like. I just pick out things in general and think "That smells a floral, or that smells like smoke. The lingo and technical stuff throws me I'm afraid!

    I would love to be able to purchase very small samples of singular notes from somewhere, so I know what it is, and what it smells like on its own.

    If anyone could help me find somewhere (online?) where I canorder small samples for a reasonably inexpensive price, - a kit maybe -I would really be grateful. Many thanks!!

    post #2 of 5

    Hi and welcome!

    Hopefully, one of our Australian members will be able to help you more, but here's a link to the Shopping section for Australia in the meantime!

    http://www.basenotes.net/f/48/australia

    post #3 of 5

    Welcome to Basenotes!

    Please check out the below link and hope it might help you a bit.

    http://www.basenotes.net/t/352842/single-note-sample-packs

    post #4 of 5

    You really can't buy single notes because notes are an impression and perfumers don't all create them the same way or using the same materials. You can buy essential oils, but they vary. Finally, you can buy molecules like iso e super but then you would have to try different dilutions, since scents that use this molecule don't all use the same amount. Even then, I'm not sure it would be worth the time and effort. Instead, why not buy scents that contain a lot of a particular note and simply study them over time. That's what I did. One day I'd wear a scent with an obvious fougere accord and the next I might wear a gourmand scent with strong lavender. Doing that, you begin to see some obvious similarities, in this case the lavender, but you also might detect some of the notes they don't have in common.

    post #5 of 5
    Thread Starter 
    Thank you all for your helpful advice and links. I will try samples when I can and work on my smelling skills. I know that I don't like anything with a strong gardenia accent, so that's a start, and I think I love Tonka bean (it's mentioned as a base note in Petit Guerlain) which is one of my summer favourites. Thanks again! dankk2.gif
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    10/4/13 at 5:19am

    klosa40 said:



    I am a new member to Basenotes, but have been reading for a long time and am a huge fan.My loveof perfume that goes way back, and started with Chanel No. 19.

    My brother was a Taxi driver in the eighties, and was taking some young ladies to their destination. He asked politely "What perfume are you wearing? It smells amazing". One said Chanel 19, one said Beautiful and the other said Youth Dew.

    On my 19th birthday, 1985, he forked out $95 and bought me Estee Lauder Beautiful as a gift and soon after that, Chanel No 19 ParfumExtrait. I was so excited, and we have both since then, enjoyed our mutual passion for amazing fragrances. He spoils his wife, and I keep promising my husband that this is definitely the last bottle I am buying. . . (yeah, sure!)

    I know what I love (my obsession at the moment is Vintage Dioressence - circa 1970's bottle) I have two full ones and one half.

    But I am a real novice at picking out notes, for example, what oakmoss, or iris actually smell like. I just pick out things in general and think "That smells a floral, or that smells like smoke. The lingo and technical stuff throws me I'm afraid!

    I would love to be able to purchase very small samples of singular notes from somewhere, so I know what it is, and what it smells like on its own.

    If anyone could help me find somewhere (online?) where I canorder small samples for a reasonably inexpensive price, - a kit maybe -I would really be grateful. Many thanks!!

    10/4/13 at 11:59am

    lpp said:



    Hi and welcome!

    Hopefully, one of our Australian members will be able to help you more, but here's a link to the Shopping section for Australia in the meantime!

    http://www.basenotes.net/f/48/australia

    10/4/13 at 12:24pm

    CapriDog said:



    Welcome to Basenotes!

    Please check out the below link and hope it might help you a bit.

    http://www.basenotes.net/t/352842/single-note-sample-packs

    10/4/13 at 1:15pm

    Bigsly said:



    You really can't buy single notes because notes are an impression and perfumers don't all create them the same way or using the same materials. You can buy essential oils, but they vary. Finally, you can buy molecules like iso e super but then you would have to try different dilutions, since scents that use this molecule don't all use the same amount. Even then, I'm not sure it would be worth the time and effort. Instead, why not buy scents that contain a lot of a particular note and simply study them over time. That's what I did. One day I'd wear a scent with an obvious fougere accord and the next I might wear a gourmand scent with strong lavender. Doing that, you begin to see some obvious similarities, in this case the lavender, but you also might detect some of the notes they don't have in common.

    10/4/13 at 6:57pm

    klosa40 said:



    Thank you all for your helpful advice and links. I will try samples when I can and work on my smelling skills. I know that I don't like anything with a strong gardenia accent, so that's a start, and I think I love Tonka bean (it's mentioned as a base note in Petit Guerlain) which is one of my summer favourites. Thanks again! dankk2.gif





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