Some Personal Advice About Fragrance & Ages...

    Some Personal Advice About Fragrance & Ages...

    post #1 of 30
    Thread Starter 

    So, this is a topic that i wanted to write about, mainly because i see posts on it that confuse me and i see advice given on threads which i think is very misleading and untrue.

     

    This is about age groups and fragrances. I think people shouldnt put ages on fragrances. E.g, i was reading a thread where a 16 year old was asking about DHI and L'Homme Nuit, and someone said that its not appropriate for a teenager at all. This is bad advice IMO as i think any age can wear these fragrances. Its all about how you present yourself. If you look sharp and clean and are wearing decent clothes that arnt scruffy, then sure you can pull of fragrances such as DHI. Fragrances really give a good impression when you look the part when wearing them imo. i dont mean suit and tie but just look nice where someone can tell you have a standard in the way you look.

     

    Go out and smell a fragrance and buy it if you like it. i find it better to not listen to age restrictions on a fragrance because its your nose which will tell you if its too mature for you or not.

     

     

    It will be good to know what other basenoters think on this topic. likewise, Just wanted to some friendly personal advice to people out there not sure about fragrances because of age boxes they have been put in.

    post #2 of 30

    Personally wear anything that appeals to me, regardless of price, House, etc. and I'm probably one of the older members!

    post #3 of 30

    Over time you change your mind..

    when I was in my 20's I blind bought Valentino V and Eau Sauvage

    I sold them both because I thought they were not appropiate for me..

    Now that I am 33 I wear whatever regardless

    post #4 of 30

    Yes, i agree, wear whatever you want, or feel comfortable wearing. But there are certain fragrances that are geared toward and or marketed to certain age groups. Whether you buy into it or not is a decision you yourself have to make.

    post #5 of 30
    Thread Starter 

    Yeah, i do know that some fragrances are geared towards certain ages. like i couldnt see a teenager wearing aramis. however, i think generally people stamp an age on a fragrance that is much more versatile agewise than people make it out to be.

    post #6 of 30

    I agree - people should never be boxed in because of things like "age" or "gender".  Fashion is a very subjective thing, and depends greatly on you, the people around you, and how you choose to present yourself to them.

     

    But saying that, I still find it highly useful to give the general style of things, because real-world people who are NOT daring, or trend-setters, or even fashion-conscious, are always looking for advice - primarily because they are unsure how things are going to be perceived by the people around them.  I think it's helpful to tailor fashion advice to what other people want, and not what *I* want.

     

    To me, it is a disservice to recommend Mitsouko to a high-school sporto who cares deeply about impressing his peer group, or the very image-conscious girl he is bonkers for.  But at the same time, if a drama dude comes on here wanting to wear classic fragrances, and he wants to get into Guerlains in all their glory, I am going to be extremely encouraging about taking risks for great rewards.

     

    Fragrance says something - we should never deceive ourselves by thinking otherwise.  But we have freedom of fragrance speech, albeit with responsibility for what we say.  Helping people make the choices that bring them the most satisfaction in life is something we can do.

     

    Thus, Polo smells "old" to my son, and I won't recommend fragrances like it to him.  But if a young friend of his were looking for a readily obtainable fragrance with a deliberately classic feel, I might recommend it as one of the top choices, along with Tiffany for Men (luckily, a boutique near here).

     

    Personally, there is nothing more satisfying to me, than seeing somebody "pull off" an out-of-the-box fashion choice.  I've actually done a fist-pump at the fashion mall when I see or smell somebody pull off something that makes me think they out-did New Yorkers.  Bravo!

    post #7 of 30
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lpp View Post

    Personally wear anything that appeals to me, regardless of price, House, etc. and I'm probably one of the older members!
    Likewise.
    post #8 of 30

    Wear what you like.   Very simple, and very true.

    post #9 of 30
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Redneck Perfumisto View Post
     

    I agree - people should never be boxed in because of things like "age" or "gender".  Fashion is a very subjective thing, and depends greatly on you, the people around you, and how you choose to present yourself to them.

     

    But saying that, I still find it highly useful to give the general style of things, because real-world people who are NOT daring, or trend-setters, or even fashion-conscious, are always looking for advice - primarily because they are unsure how things are going to be perceived by the people around them.  I think it's helpful to tailor fashion advice to what other people want, and not what *I* want.

     

    To me, it is a disservice to recommend Mitsouko to a high-school sporto who cares deeply about impressing his peer group, or the very image-conscious girl he is bonkers for.  But at the same time, if a drama dude comes on here wanting to wear classic fragrances, and he wants to get into Guerlains in all their glory, I am going to be extremely encouraging about taking risks for great rewards.

     

    Fragrance says something - we should never deceive ourselves by thinking otherwise.  But we have freedom of fragrance speech, albeit with responsibility for what we say.  Helping people make the choices that bring them the most satisfaction in life is something we can do.

     

    Thus, Polo smells "old" to my son, and I won't recommend fragrances like it to him.  But if a young friend of his were looking for a readily obtainable fragrance with a deliberately classic feel, I might recommend it as one of the top choices, along with Tiffany for Men (luckily, a boutique near here).

     

    Personally, there is nothing more satisfying to me, than seeing somebody "pull off" an out-of-the-box fashion choice.  I've actually done a fist-pump at the fashion mall when I see or smell somebody pull off something that makes me think they out-did New Yorkers.  Bravo!

     

    This is spot on. Though I feel I'm in the "wear what you want" camp, this is more practical advice to the everyday regular joe. 

    post #10 of 30
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Redneck Perfumisto View Post
     

    I agree - people should never be boxed in because of things like "age" or "gender".  Fashion is a very subjective thing, and depends greatly on you, the people around you, and how you choose to present yourself to them.

     

    But saying that, I still find it highly useful to give the general style of things, because real-world people who are NOT daring, or trend-setters, or even fashion-conscious, are always looking for advice - primarily because they are unsure how things are going to be perceived by the people around them.  I think it's helpful to tailor fashion advice to what other people want, and not what *I* want.

     

    To me, it is a disservice to recommend Mitsouko to a high-school sporto who cares deeply about impressing his peer group, or the very image-conscious girl he is bonkers for.  But at the same time, if a drama dude comes on here wanting to wear classic fragrances, and he wants to get into Guerlains in all their glory, I am going to be extremely encouraging about taking risks for great rewards.

     

    Fragrance says something - we should never deceive ourselves by thinking otherwise.  But we have freedom of fragrance speech, albeit with responsibility for what we say.  Helping people make the choices that bring them the most satisfaction in life is something we can do.

     

    Thus, Polo smells "old" to my son, and I won't recommend fragrances like it to him.  But if a young friend of his were looking for a readily obtainable fragrance with a deliberately classic feel, I might recommend it as one of the top choices, along with Tiffany for Men (luckily, a boutique near here).

     

    Personally, there is nothing more satisfying to me, than seeing somebody "pull off" an out-of-the-box fashion choice.  I've actually done a fist-pump at the fashion mall when I see or smell somebody pull off something that makes me think they out-did New Yorkers.  Bravo!

     

    :-) Just wonderful. A little piece of literature.

    post #11 of 30
    I understand about the logic of ' wear whatever one likes'.

    I have tried Carnal flower, Mitsokou, 31 Rue Cambon, those 80's powerhouse scents and know they are not for me because they are either too pretty or more mature for my taste at the moment. That is my loss. If a newbie in my age range asks for an opinion about them, I have to be honest about how I feel. She or he can then decide herself or himself by sampling and kudos to them if they can rock it.
    I understand one day I get older and my kids might make fun of my retro scents then so be it.

    Edit-

    I have never seen any one more than 50 yrs old wearing clothes from A& F even if the person is still fit. If there are, kudos to them. I am not equating the choice of clothes to that of scent but is there a certain small level? Are there any scents that might feel too young for a 70 yrs old? I don't know.
    Edited by CapriDog - 10/6/13 at 6:05am
    post #12 of 30
    When I wear a fragrance that really suits me, I feel better about myself, and about life in general.
    post #13 of 30

    Great answer from Red, :vrolijk_26: & beautifully put. Although l myself am firmly in the "wear what you like" camp, he makes a very valid point.

    post #14 of 30
    Edit above
    post #15 of 30

    What's ideal is not always practical.

     

    The ideal thing to say is "Anyone at any age can wear any fragrance".

    The practical (but totally unideal) thing to say is "If you're younger and wear certain fragrances, some people will find it strange"

     

    It's subjective, but there are clear boundaries.  Issey Miyake is much more recommendable than Aramis, for example, to a teenager.

     

    But no matter what your fragrance is, some people won't like it. 

    post #16 of 30

    There's a good reason why we have a sticky with many posts on which fragrance gets the most compliments.

     

    Peer acceptance matters a lot more to a teenager than to the above 40 crowd. So yes, age matters when it comes to recommending fragrances to certain age groups. Just because you 'wear whatever you like' you shouldn't be imposing the same mantra on someone else without considering their social background and fragrance-wearing experience. Clearly some fragrances are more age-friendly than others.

    post #17 of 30

    10/5/13 at 10:52am

    AHS said:



    So, this is a topic that i wanted to write about, mainly because i see posts on it that confuse me and i see advice given on threads which i think is very misleading and untrue.

     

    This is about age groups and fragrances. I think people shouldnt put ages on fragrances. E.g, i was reading a thread where a 16 year old was asking about DHI and L'Homme Nuit, and someone said that its not appropriate for a teenager at all. This is bad advice IMO as i think any age can wear these fragrances. Its all about how you present yourself. If you look sharp and clean and are wearing decent clothes that arnt scruffy, then sure you can pull of fragrances such as DHI. Fragrances really give a good impression when you look the part when wearing them imo. i dont mean suit and tie but just look nice where someone can tell you have a standard in the way you look.

     

    Go out and smell a fragrance and buy it if you like it. i find it better to not listen to age restrictions on a fragrance because its your nose which will tell you if its too mature for you or not.

     

     

    It will be good to know what other basenoters think on this topic. likewise, Just wanted to some friendly personal advice to people out there not sure about fragrances because of age boxes they have been put in.

    10/5/13 at 10:58am

    lpp said:



    Personally wear anything that appeals to me, regardless of price, House, etc. and I'm probably one of the older members!

    10/5/13 at 11:05am

    Tony T said:



    Over time you change your mind..

    when I was in my 20's I blind bought Valentino V and Eau Sauvage

    I sold them both because I thought they were not appropiate for me..

    Now that I am 33 I wear whatever regardless

    10/5/13 at 11:18am

    timmy-j said:



    Yes, i agree, wear whatever you want, or feel comfortable wearing. But there are certain fragrances that are geared toward and or marketed to certain age groups. Whether you buy into it or not is a decision you yourself have to make.

    10/5/13 at 11:21am

    AHS said:



    Yeah, i do know that some fragrances are geared towards certain ages. like i couldnt see a teenager wearing aramis. however, i think generally people stamp an age on a fragrance that is much more versatile agewise than people make it out to be.

    10/5/13 at 11:38am

    Redneck Perfumisto said:



    I agree - people should never be boxed in because of things like "age" or "gender".  Fashion is a very subjective thing, and depends greatly on you, the people around you, and how you choose to present yourself to them.

     

    But saying that, I still find it highly useful to give the general style of things, because real-world people who are NOT daring, or trend-setters, or even fashion-conscious, are always looking for advice - primarily because they are unsure how things are going to be perceived by the people around them.  I think it's helpful to tailor fashion advice to what other people want, and not what *I* want.

     

    To me, it is a disservice to recommend Mitsouko to a high-school sporto who cares deeply about impressing his peer group, or the very image-conscious girl he is bonkers for.  But at the same time, if a drama dude comes on here wanting to wear classic fragrances, and he wants to get into Guerlains in all their glory, I am going to be extremely encouraging about taking risks for great rewards.

     

    Fragrance says something - we should never deceive ourselves by thinking otherwise.  But we have freedom of fragrance speech, albeit with responsibility for what we say.  Helping people make the choices that bring them the most satisfaction in life is something we can do.

     

    Thus, Polo smells "old" to my son, and I won't recommend fragrances like it to him.  But if a young friend of his were looking for a readily obtainable fragrance with a deliberately classic feel, I might recommend it as one of the top choices, along with Tiffany for Men (luckily, a boutique near here).

     

    Personally, there is nothing more satisfying to me, than seeing somebody "pull off" an out-of-the-box fashion choice.  I've actually done a fist-pump at the fashion mall when I see or smell somebody pull off something that makes me think they out-did New Yorkers.  Bravo!

    10/5/13 at 12:36pm

    hednic said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lpp View Post

    Personally wear anything that appeals to me, regardless of price, House, etc. and I'm probably one of the older members!
    Likewise.

    10/5/13 at 12:45pm

    David Ruskin said:



    Wear what you like.   Very simple, and very true.

    10/5/13 at 12:48pm

    tonghpafu said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Redneck Perfumisto View Post
     

    I agree - people should never be boxed in because of things like "age" or "gender".  Fashion is a very subjective thing, and depends greatly on you, the people around you, and how you choose to present yourself to them.

     

    But saying that, I still find it highly useful to give the general style of things, because real-world people who are NOT daring, or trend-setters, or even fashion-conscious, are always looking for advice - primarily because they are unsure how things are going to be perceived by the people around them.  I think it's helpful to tailor fashion advice to what other people want, and not what *I* want.

     

    To me, it is a disservice to recommend Mitsouko to a high-school sporto who cares deeply about impressing his peer group, or the very image-conscious girl he is bonkers for.  But at the same time, if a drama dude comes on here wanting to wear classic fragrances, and he wants to get into Guerlains in all their glory, I am going to be extremely encouraging about taking risks for great rewards.

     

    Fragrance says something - we should never deceive ourselves by thinking otherwise.  But we have freedom of fragrance speech, albeit with responsibility for what we say.  Helping people make the choices that bring them the most satisfaction in life is something we can do.

     

    Thus, Polo smells "old" to my son, and I won't recommend fragrances like it to him.  But if a young friend of his were looking for a readily obtainable fragrance with a deliberately classic feel, I might recommend it as one of the top choices, along with Tiffany for Men (luckily, a boutique near here).

     

    Personally, there is nothing more satisfying to me, than seeing somebody "pull off" an out-of-the-box fashion choice.  I've actually done a fist-pump at the fashion mall when I see or smell somebody pull off something that makes me think they out-did New Yorkers.  Bravo!

     

    This is spot on. Though I feel I'm in the "wear what you want" camp, this is more practical advice to the everyday regular joe. 

    10/5/13 at 12:50pm

    Eule said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Redneck Perfumisto View Post
     

    I agree - people should never be boxed in because of things like "age" or "gender".  Fashion is a very subjective thing, and depends greatly on you, the people around you, and how you choose to present yourself to them.

     

    But saying that, I still find it highly useful to give the general style of things, because real-world people who are NOT daring, or trend-setters, or even fashion-conscious, are always looking for advice - primarily because they are unsure how things are going to be perceived by the people around them.  I think it's helpful to tailor fashion advice to what other people want, and not what *I* want.

     

    To me, it is a disservice to recommend Mitsouko to a high-school sporto who cares deeply about impressing his peer group, or the very image-conscious girl he is bonkers for.  But at the same time, if a drama dude comes on here wanting to wear classic fragrances, and he wants to get into Guerlains in all their glory, I am going to be extremely encouraging about taking risks for great rewards.

     

    Fragrance says something - we should never deceive ourselves by thinking otherwise.  But we have freedom of fragrance speech, albeit with responsibility for what we say.  Helping people make the choices that bring them the most satisfaction in life is something we can do.

     

    Thus, Polo smells "old" to my son, and I won't recommend fragrances like it to him.  But if a young friend of his were looking for a readily obtainable fragrance with a deliberately classic feel, I might recommend it as one of the top choices, along with Tiffany for Men (luckily, a boutique near here).

     

    Personally, there is nothing more satisfying to me, than seeing somebody "pull off" an out-of-the-box fashion choice.  I've actually done a fist-pump at the fashion mall when I see or smell somebody pull off something that makes me think they out-did New Yorkers.  Bravo!

     

    :-) Just wonderful. A little piece of literature.

    10/5/13 at 1:19pm

    CapriDog said:



    I understand about the logic of ' wear whatever one likes'.

    I have tried Carnal flower, Mitsokou, 31 Rue Cambon, those 80's powerhouse scents and know they are not for me because they are either too pretty or more mature for my taste at the moment. That is my loss. If a newbie in my age range asks for an opinion about them, I have to be honest about how I feel. She or he can then decide herself or himself by sampling and kudos to them if they can rock it.
    I understand one day I get older and my kids might make fun of my retro scents then so be it.

    Edit-

    I have never seen any one more than 50 yrs old wearing clothes from A& F even if the person is still fit. If there are, kudos to them. I am not equating the choice of clothes to that of scent but is there a certain small level? Are there any scents that might feel too young for a 70 yrs old? I don't know.
    Edited by CapriDog - 10/6/13 at 6:05am

    10/5/13 at 2:11pm

    Curly11 said:



    When I wear a fragrance that really suits me, I feel better about myself, and about life in general.

    10/6/13 at 12:37am

    teardrop said:



    Great answer from Red, :vrolijk_26: & beautifully put. Although l myself am firmly in the "wear what you like" camp, he makes a very valid point.

    10/6/13 at 5:54am

    CapriDog said:



    Edit above

    10/6/13 at 6:23pm

    noirdrakkar said:



    What's ideal is not always practical.

     

    The ideal thing to say is "Anyone at any age can wear any fragrance".

    The practical (but totally unideal) thing to say is "If you're younger and wear certain fragrances, some people will find it strange"

     

    It's subjective, but there are clear boundaries.  Issey Miyake is much more recommendable than Aramis, for example, to a teenager.

     

    But no matter what your fragrance is, some people won't like it. 

    10/6/13 at 8:27pm

    Diamondflame said:



    There's a good reason why we have a sticky with many posts on which fragrance gets the most compliments.

     

    Peer acceptance matters a lot more to a teenager than to the above 40 crowd. So yes, age matters when it comes to recommending fragrances to certain age groups. Just because you 'wear whatever you like' you shouldn't be imposing the same mantra on someone else without considering their social background and fragrance-wearing experience. Clearly some fragrances are more age-friendly than others.