What is "luxury?"

    What is "luxury?"

    post #1 of 44
    Thread Starter 
    What makes a fragrance feel "luxurious?

    The standard answer is "quality ingredients," but is that really the case? Most perfumes today are Ade from a standard set of aromachemicals manufactured by just a few large firms.

    And yet most Basenoters would say confidently that Sycomore smells more luxurious than Encre Noire, or that Sel Marin smells more luxurious than Bergamotto Marino.

    I guess my question boils down to this: is it simply a psychological trick? A function of brand perceptions and pricing? Or are there certain ingredients that, when included, consistently create the impression of luxury?

    Is "luxury" in the fragrance or in our brains?
    post #2 of 44
    I think it's a bit of both (in the fragrance and in our brains). Luxury, to me, is the whole experience. From purchasing, to the packaging/presentation, to how the fragrance makes me feel.

    Going to Chanel and picking out an Exclusif is more luxurious than purchasing Encre Noire. The SAs at Chanel can be really nice. Then your purchase is all wrapped up in a very nicely presented box/bag, and you get to go home and enjoy your fragrance. The bottle, sprayer and cap should have some heft, be well made (I love the magnetic cap!), and feel good in the hand. Is the fragrance refined? Does the fragrance make me feel like a million bucks? Sure, it does!
    post #3 of 44
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lairdangus View Post


    Is "luxury" in the fragrance or in our brains?
    Maybe it's a bit of both.
    post #4 of 44

    Something that isn't sold at Macy's. trollolololololol

    post #5 of 44
    When I smell Tea for Two, I smell luxury even though it's adequately priced.

    On the other hand, Xerjoff Zafar is no luxury to my nose but it's pricey.
    post #6 of 44

    Something maybe above your means..

    I drive an Impala so a Benz or anything higher would be luxury to me..

     

    So stuff like

    Clive Christian

    Xerjoff

    MDCI

    post #7 of 44
    Luxury is whatever you don't need.
    post #8 of 44
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MiniMasterMike View Post

    Luxury is whatever you don't need.

    Plain and simple

    post #9 of 44

    I feel like it's depth and development.  When a fragrance has a lot of complexity and change over the course of it's wearing, that feels luxurious to me.  I'd also add that when it has longevity, that feels more like luxury as well.  I'd also say this impression will vary drastically from one person to the next.

    post #10 of 44

    Oh, and since my opinion of Oud has changed recently, I'd also add this it has a luxurious quality to it in my mind.

    post #11 of 44

    A great combination of fine notes giving the impression of luxury world that is.

    post #12 of 44
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by VintagePoison View Post

    I think it's a bit of both (in the fragrance and in our brains). Luxury, to me, is the whole experience. From purchasing, to the packaging/presentation, to how the fragrance makes me feel.

    Going to Chanel and picking out an Exclusif is more luxurious than purchasing Encre Noire. The SAs at Chanel can be really nice. Then your purchase is all wrapped up in a very nicely presented box/bag, and you get to go home and enjoy your fragrance. The bottle, sprayer and cap should have some heft, be well made (I love the magnetic cap!), and feel good in the hand. Is the fragrance refined? Does the fragrance make me feel like a million bucks? Sure, it does!

    <<<--- totally agree, word for word.

    Some fragrances that fall into such category to me are:
    Slumberhouse Vikt & Baque
    MDCI Invasion Barbare
    most Amouage's
    Kilian Incense Oud
    Tuscan Leather
    Or Black
    Chanel's Cuir de Russie / 31 Rue Cambon / Bel Respiro / Coromandel
    Malle's Carnal Flower / POAL / French Lover
    Tauer's LDDM & Incense Rose
    So many from MPeG's - particularly Ambre Preciaux / Parfum d'Habit / Eau des Iles & Santal Noble
    Guerlain's so many parfums, particularly the ones in the wonderful bee bottles + extraits of vintage Shalimar & Jicky.
    L'Artisan's Al Oudh
    Nasomatto's Black Afgano & Duro
    Surprisingly, Montale Aoud Lime & Attar.
    vintage goodies filled with oakmoss have started to have that effect in the last few months - quorum / Paco rabanne / worth ph haute conc, ho hang club, balenciaga ph etc are re"wow"ing me again!!!

     

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MiniMasterMike View Post

    Luxury is whatever you don't need.

    I think the OP was asking this with rgds to fragrances...

    post #13 of 44
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by badarun View Post

    I think the OP was asking this with rgds to fragrances...
    I understand that.

    I'm just saying that fragrance in itself is a luxury since there is no need for it. Trying to classify fragrances into luxorious and otherwise is a purely psychological phenomenon.
    post #14 of 44

    It's expensive lush ingredients like Mysore Sandalwood & Agarwood and the intensity of them in a fragrance like in a extract that defines a luxury fragrance. Also the bottle been made out of crystal with gold lettering and a well established name with a limited release all add to the luxurious mystique.

    post #15 of 44
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MiniMasterMike View Post

    Luxury is whatever you don't need.


    Good answer.

    post #16 of 44

    I was going to start a thread on what's in cheap for us to classify blends as such. In other words, what makes cheap cheap, and vice versa (what makes a good quality fragrance such a blend).

     

    It is related to your question, what makes luxurious luxurious.

     

    1-. Perception

    2-. Technical aspects

     

    We will perceive niche offerings as luxurious because of the price, packaging, stores where they are sold, comments from aficionados we consider savvy in perfumes, origin, nose in charge, the house behind the scent, etc.

     

    To these, add some objective qualities: complexity, for example. You can actually tell if the scent is good quality if you can perceive how notes morph along time. Add to this the way notes blend, they don't feel discordant. Plus physical reactions: you won't get the feeling of needles in your nostrils, or headaches, or a scratchy feeling in them.

     

    Hold on.

     

    These objective qualities are related to perception. It is the "hen - egg" discussion.

     

    I used to work in marketing research. We would conduct product tests for wine companies among established aficionados. Enologists laughed really hard at them, for aficionados radically change their minds on product quality as soon as brands were introduced: a branded wine would be ranted, but highly classified when tried blind.

     

    Cheating people can be amazingly easy.

     

    Going to the point: luxury is a social construct that is backed by hefty prices.

    post #17 of 44
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Pollux View Post
     

    I was going to start a thread on what's in cheap for us to classify blends as such. In other words, what makes cheap cheap, and vice versa (what makes a good quality fragrance such a blend).

     

    It is related to your question, what makes luxurious luxurious.

     

    1-. Perception

    2-. Technical aspects

     

    We will perceive niche offerings as luxurious because of the price, packaging, stores where they are sold, comments from aficionados we consider savvy in perfumes, origin, nose in charge, the house behind the scent, etc.

     

    To these, add some objective qualities: complexity, for example. You can actually tell if the scent is good quality if you can perceive how notes morph along time. Add to this the way notes blend, they don't feel discordant. Plus physical reactions: you won't get the feeling of needles in your nostrils, or headaches, or a scratchy feeling in them.

     

    Hold on.

     

    These objective qualities are related to perception. It is the "hen - egg" discussion.

     

    I used to work in marketing research. We would conduct product tests for wine companies among established aficionados. Enologists laughed really hard at them, for aficionados radically change their minds on product quality as soon as brands were introduced: a branded wine would be ranted, but highly classified when tried blind.

     

    Cheating people can be amazingly easy.

     

    Going to the point: luxury is a social construct that is backed by hefty prices.

    I have to agree with you in very large part.  Here's a recent story from my personal experience.  I walked into Barneys in Seatlle, dressed in my Lane Bryant blue jeans and an Old Navy T-shirt, carrying my inexpensive hoodie from Niagra Falls and toting my Etienne Aignier handback.  I'd been out all day and didn't look my very best.  Alongside me was my daughter who is a thrift store/freebie queen.  She was wearing boots, the sole of which was literally flapping in the breeze.

     

    I was there to, imagine it, visit the perfume counter.  The SA took one look at us, giving us a very disdainful once over and made the judgement that we had not enough money to spend and chose to not give us the time of day.  The idea at a place like Barneys, I can only assume, is to have an attitude of exclusivity so the have not's won't waclass="

    10/10/13 at 5:18pm

    lairdangus said:



    What makes a fragrance feel "luxurious?

    The standard answer is "quality ingredients," but is that really the case? Most perfumes today are Ade from a standard set of aromachemicals manufactured by just a few large firms.

    And yet most Basenoters would say confidently that Sycomore smells more luxurious than Encre Noire, or that Sel Marin smells more luxurious than Bergamotto Marino.

    I guess my question boils down to this: is it simply a psychological trick? A function of brand perceptions and pricing? Or are there certain ingredients that, when included, consistently create the impression of luxury?

    Is "luxury" in the fragrance or in our brains?

    10/10/13 at 5:23pm

    VintagePoison said:



    I think it's a bit of both (in the fragrance and in our brains). Luxury, to me, is the whole experience. From purchasing, to the packaging/presentation, to how the fragrance makes me feel.

    Going to Chanel and picking out an Exclusif is more luxurious than purchasing Encre Noire. The SAs at Chanel can be really nice. Then your purchase is all wrapped up in a very nicely presented box/bag, and you get to go home and enjoy your fragrance. The bottle, sprayer and cap should have some heft, be well made (I love the magnetic cap!), and feel good in the hand. Is the fragrance refined? Does the fragrance make me feel like a million bucks? Sure, it does!

    10/10/13 at 5:24pm

    hednic said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lairdangus View Post


    Is "luxury" in the fragrance or in our brains?
    Maybe it's a bit of both.

    10/10/13 at 5:29pm

    mjones602 said:



    Something that isn't sold at Macy's. trollolololololol

    10/10/13 at 5:38pm

    CapriDog said:



    When I smell Tea for Two, I smell luxury even though it's adequately priced.

    On the other hand, Xerjoff Zafar is no luxury to my nose but it's pricey.

    10/10/13 at 7:36pm

    Tony T said:



    Something maybe above your means..

    I drive an Impala so a Benz or anything higher would be luxury to me..

     

    So stuff like

    Clive Christian

    Xerjoff

    MDCI

    10/10/13 at 7:43pm

    MiniMasterMike said:



    Luxury is whatever you don't need.

    10/10/13 at 7:44pm

    Tony T said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MiniMasterMike View Post

    Luxury is whatever you don't need.

    Plain and simple

    10/10/13 at 7:56pm

    danieq said:



    I feel like it's depth and development.  When a fragrance has a lot of complexity and change over the course of it's wearing, that feels luxurious to me.  I'd also add that when it has longevity, that feels more like luxury as well.  I'd also say this impression will vary drastically from one person to the next.

    10/10/13 at 7:58pm

    danieq said:



    Oh, and since my opinion of Oud has changed recently, I'd also add this it has a luxurious quality to it in my mind.

    10/10/13 at 8:06pm

    Pedro A said:



    A great combination of fine notes giving the impression of luxury world that is.

    10/10/13 at 8:54pm

    badarun said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by VintagePoison View Post

    I think it's a bit of both (in the fragrance and in our brains). Luxury, to me, is the whole experience. From purchasing, to the packaging/presentation, to how the fragrance makes me feel.

    Going to Chanel and picking out an Exclusif is more luxurious than purchasing Encre Noire. The SAs at Chanel can be really nice. Then your purchase is all wrapped up in a very nicely presented box/bag, and you get to go home and enjoy your fragrance. The bottle, sprayer and cap should have some heft, be well made (I love the magnetic cap!), and feel good in the hand. Is the fragrance refined? Does the fragrance make me feel like a million bucks? Sure, it does!

    <<<--- totally agree, word for word.

    Some fragrances that fall into such category to me are:
    Slumberhouse Vikt & Baque
    MDCI Invasion Barbare
    most Amouage's
    Kilian Incense Oud
    Tuscan Leather
    Or Black
    Chanel's Cuir de Russie / 31 Rue Cambon / Bel Respiro / Coromandel
    Malle's Carnal Flower / POAL / French Lover
    Tauer's LDDM & Incense Rose
    So many from MPeG's - particularly Ambre Preciaux / Parfum d'Habit / Eau des Iles & Santal Noble
    Guerlain's so many parfums, particularly the ones in the wonderful bee bottles + extraits of vintage Shalimar & Jicky.
    L'Artisan's Al Oudh
    Nasomatto's Black Afgano & Duro
    Surprisingly, Montale Aoud Lime & Attar.
    vintage goodies filled with oakmoss have started to have that effect in the last few months - quorum / Paco rabanne / worth ph haute conc, ho hang club, balenciaga ph etc are re"wow"ing me again!!!

     

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MiniMasterMike View Post

    Luxury is whatever you don't need.

    I think the OP was asking this with rgds to fragrances...

    10/11/13 at 8:32am

    MiniMasterMike said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by badarun View Post

    I think the OP was asking this with rgds to fragrances...
    I understand that.

    I'm just saying that fragrance in itself is a luxury since there is no need for it. Trying to classify fragrances into luxorious and otherwise is a purely psychological phenomenon.

    10/11/13 at 10:25am

    Jack Hunter said:



    It's expensive lush ingredients like Mysore Sandalwood & Agarwood and the intensity of them in a fragrance like in a extract that defines a luxury fragrance. Also the bottle been made out of crystal with gold lettering and a well established name with a limited release all add to the luxurious mystique.

    10/11/13 at 11:52am

    sjg3839 said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MiniMasterMike View Post

    Luxury is whatever you don't need.


    Good answer.

    10/11/13 at 3:45pm

    Pollux said:



    I was going to start a thread on what's in cheap for us to classify blends as such. In other words, what makes cheap cheap, and vice versa (what makes a good quality fragrance such a blend).

     

    It is related to your question, what makes luxurious luxurious.

     

    1-. Perception

    2-. Technical aspects

     

    We will perceive niche offerings as luxurious because of the price, packaging, stores where they are sold, comments from aficionados we consider savvy in perfumes, origin, nose in charge, the house behind the scent, etc.

     

    To these, add some objective qualities: complexity, for example. You can actually tell if the scent is good quality if you can perceive how notes morph along time. Add to this the way notes blend, they don't feel discordant. Plus physical reactions: you won't get the feeling of needles in your nostrils, or headaches, or a scratchy feeling in them.

     

    Hold on.

     

    These objective qualities are related to perception. It is the "hen - egg" discussion.

     

    I used to work in marketing research. We would conduct product tests for wine companies among established aficionados. Enologists laughed really hard at them, for aficionados radically change their minds on product quality as soon as brands were introduced: a branded wine would be ranted, but highly classified when tried blind.

     

    Cheating people can be amazingly easy.

     

    Going to the point: luxury is a social construct that is backed by hefty prices.

    10/11/13 at 6:45pm

    danieq said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Pollux View Post
     

    I was going to start a thread on what's in cheap for us to classify blends as such. In other words, what makes cheap cheap, and vice versa (what makes a good quality fragrance such a blend).

     

    It is related to your question, what makes luxurious luxurious.

     

    1-. Perception

    2-. Technical aspects

     

    We will perceive niche offerings as luxurious because of the price, packaging, stores where they are sold, comments from aficionados we consider savvy in perfumes, origin, nose in charge, the house behind the scent, etc.

     

    To these, add some objective qualities: complexity, for example. You can actually tell if the scent is good quality if you can perceive how notes morph along time. Add to this the way notes blend, they don't feel discordant. Plus physical reactions: you won't get the feeling of needles in your nostrils, or headaches, or a scratchy feeling in them.

     

    Hold on.

     

    These objective qualities are related to perception. It is the "hen - egg" discussion.

     

    I used to work in marketing research. We would conduct product tests for wine companies among established aficionados. Enologists laughed really hard at them, for aficionados radically change their minds on product quality as soon as brands were introduced: a branded wine would be ranted, but highly classified when tried blind.

     

    Cheating people can be amazingly easy.

     

    Going to the point: luxury is a social construct that is backed by hefty prices.

    I have to agree with you in very large part.  Here's a recent story from my personal experience.  I walked into Barneys in Seatlle, dressed in my Lane Bryant blue jeans and an Old Navy T-shirt, carrying my inexpensive hoodie from Niagra Falls and toting my Etienne Aignier handback.  I'd been out all day and didn't look my very best.  Alongside me was my daughter who is a thrift store/freebie queen.  She was wearing boots, the sole of which was literally flapping in the breeze.

     

    I was there to, imagine it, visit the perfume counter.  The SA took one look at us, giving us a very disdainful once over and made the judgement that we had not enough money to spend and chose to not give us the time of day.  The idea at a place like Barneys, I can only assume, is to have an attitude of exclusivity so the have not's won't waclass="