Difference in France versions of French perfumes?

    Difference in France versions of French perfumes?

    post #1 of 28
    Thread Starter 

    Hi, all.  I've just ordered the Perfumery Notes Kit from the Perfumer's Apprentice and can't wait to begin the formal education of my nose!  A question.  Has anyone ever noticed a difference between French perfumes sold in France vs in foreign markets like the USA?

    post #2 of 28

    Hey there!

     

    I've never noticed one, but one difference (at least in the past) was that perfume in Europe was made with pure grain alcohol, whereas what they distributed in the US was made with denatured alcohol so that people couldn't drink it.  I think the perfume oil was the same.

     

    Some old Guerlain EdCs say "blended in the USA" or Mexico, because they only imported the oil and bottles, and then blended it with domestic alcohol and bottled (to avoid paying to ship all that alcohol across the ocean I assume).

     

    Nowadays, I think it's all made in the same place the same way.  I assume it simplifies their supply chain and manufacturing to keep it all in one place.

    post #3 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ScentFan View Post

    Has anyone ever noticed a difference between French perfumes sold in France vs in foreign markets like the USA?
    The same fragrance made in the same country but sold in different markets - no
    However, same fragrance made in different countries and sold anywhere - yes.
    post #4 of 28
    Thread Starter 

    Thanks, rubegon and hednic.  Is there a local perfume industry there, by any chance, like the local wine industry?  Small houses producing good scents that aren't exported?

    post #5 of 28

    There are many niche houses in France and Europe, but usually these find the way to the US sooner or later, though they are more difficult to find here.  In Italy at least (not sure about France) sometimes there are local pharmacies or the like that make simple perfumes, but usually these are not particularly good.

     

    cacio

    post #6 of 28
    Thread Starter 

    Thanks, cacio.  It will be fun to look for them.

    post #7 of 28
    The closest thing might be going to Grasse and doing tours of the Molinard and Fragonard factories. I've never done it, but that's the birthplace of the western perfume industry. It might be worth checking out. Then again it might be like a Disney version of its former self by now.
    post #8 of 28
    Also should probably include the Galimard factory with the two already mentioned above.
    post #9 of 28
    Thread Starter 

    Cacio, picking up L'Erbolario's Sandalwood in Italy is what really started me on this path.  I thought it was an essential oil, but opening it years later, discovered it was a perfume.  I ordered several more of their perfumes and ultimately fell in love with three.  Then I discovered Luca Turin's little book and was a goner.  Searching around, I see fragrantica lists perfumers by country so I'll start there.

     

    Thanks rubegon and hednic.  Yes, Grasse.  Of course!  Molinard, Fragonard, Galimard.  What a journey that will be.  Hasten the day.

    post #10 of 28

    I remember way back some saying that US made Chanel was sweeter than the European version.   As said its the alcohol used it seems, goes back to prohibition when they banned the alcohol.   Yes, people used to swig Chanel No5 in the streets of US cities.  Of course not, but the government did not take any chances.

    post #11 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by donna255 View Post
     

    I remember way back some saying that US made Chanel was sweeter than the European version.   As said its the alcohol used it seems, goes back to prohibition when they banned the alcohol.   Yes, people used to swig Chanel No5 in the streets of US cities.  Of course not, but the government did not take any chances.

     

    I have a vintage 1000ml bottle of Eau du Coq from France.  I bet it would make a good martini!  It should be totally drinkable - grain alcohol, citrus oils, herbs... not much else it seems?  I probably paid less for it per ml than some premium vodkas.

    post #12 of 28
    Rubegon, maybe you should try a drop in a martini and give us a report. laugh.gif Actually I'm serious about that. IMO, some of the liquids that are added to cocktails are very much like perfume.
    post #13 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Curly11 View Post

    Rubegon, maybe you should try a drop in a martini and give us a report. laugh.gif
    Look forward to that report also!
    post #14 of 28
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Curly11 View Post

    Rubegon, maybe you should try a drop in a martini and give us a report. laugh.gif Actually I'm serious about that. IMO, some of the liquids that are added to cocktails are very much like perfume.

     

    I'll experiment this weekend. :)

    post #15 of 28

    Post the report using the free wifi in the waiting room of whatever ER youre at.

    post #16 of 28

    I've ingested many things that are more toxic than a drop of vintage EdC.  I've eaten food from street vendors in 3rd world countries.  I think I'll survive.

    post #17 of 28

    I was picturing you chug-a-luging. Get twisted brah! 

    post #18 of 28