Are Reformulations Announced by the House?

    Are Reformulations Announced by the House?

    post #1 of 14
    Thread Starter 

    I read alot about reformulations and I was wondering, do the houses announce when they have done this?  How are you certain that this has happened typically?

     

    I am particularly interested in whether we know when Amouage reformulated Lyric Woman and how we know that is true.  Are there articles where this info can be found?

    post #2 of 14
    They very rarely admit to or announce reformulations.
    post #3 of 14
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hednic View Post

    They very rarely admit to or announce reformulations.

     

    Exactly. They won't even admit to reformulations, let alone be honest about it and tell the consumer.

    post #4 of 14
    Thread Starter 

    Really?  Do we have any idea why that would be?  That just seems dishonest and liable to push customers away.

    post #5 of 14

    As other said, houses almost never admit to reformulation, or if at all downplay it. Small reformulations can happen all the time, especially with natural materials whose characteristic can vary from year to year, and should be of no worry, if done well.

     

    But we're talking about reformulations that change a perfume in a substantial way. Two main reasons, one is substituting more expensive materials with cheaper ones, the other one, the most important in recent years, is because of IFRA regulations (many threads about this). A big IFRA regulation came into effect in 2010, so many fragrances changed around that year (oakmoss, jasmine, heliotropin, and more).

     

    I don't know what the specific reason for Amouage's change. I don't know whether any of the components of the original Lyric was restricted. Other Amouage perfumes have been reformulated. We know because several people have smelled vintage and current and have found them very different.

     

    cacio

    post #6 of 14

    There are often indications such as altered bottles or packaging, danieq.

    There are also serial number changes for those who keep track of these things - these may give clues.

    As cacio has stated, many changes are very subtle (and gradual), whilst others are not.

    post #7 of 14
    Thread Starter 
    Thanks everyone for the explanation. So very much to learn about this hobby.
    post #8 of 14

    It's interesting that IFRA makes a big deal out of their regulations, and then perfume houses, who are the force behind IFRA, deny that they make any difference at all.

    post #9 of 14
    Le Labo has been very transparent and announced that Patchouli 24 was reformulated.

    Other houses should take note.
    post #10 of 14

    Indeed, and it was actually one of the cases where the reformulation didn't matter much, as the current juice is still going strong.

     

    cacio

    post #11 of 14
    Thread Starter 

    Well good for Le Labo!  I'm actually looking at one of the fragrances now.  An honest company makes me more interested in supporting them.

    post #12 of 14

    A good reason to always sample before buying, even with a scent you think you know well, if that's possible. I've been very disappointed with the formulations of Paris, Mitsouko, L'Heure Bleue, and too many others to mention. Scents I've worn for many years and really thought I would wear for the rest of my life have been altered beyond recognition.

     

     Good for Le Labo, though!

    post #13 of 14
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by danieq View Post
     

    Well good for Le Labo!  I'm actually looking at one of the fragrances now.  An honest company makes me more interested in supporting them.

     

     

        It's a brave move alright, in that I suspect the vast majority of their customers don't know anything about the reformulation issue, and now they'll have to explain it to them.

     

       At the same time I feel the same as you do : That kind of honesty wins my admiration.

    post #14 of 14
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by redrose View Post
     

    A good reason to always sample before buying, even with a scent you think you know well, if that's possible....

     

    Sometimes the tester bottle is the older version, though, especially if the reformulation was recent.

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    10/15/13 at 2:34pm

    danieq said:



    I read alot about reformulations and I was wondering, do the houses announce when they have done this?  How are you certain that this has happened typically?

     

    I am particularly interested in whether we know when Amouage reformulated Lyric Woman and how we know that is true.  Are there articles where this info can be found?

    10/15/13 at 2:38pm

    hednic said:



    They very rarely admit to or announce reformulations.

    10/15/13 at 2:42pm

    PalmBeach said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hednic View Post

    They very rarely admit to or announce reformulations.

     

    Exactly. They won't even admit to reformulations, let alone be honest about it and tell the consumer.

    10/15/13 at 2:43pm

    danieq said:



    Really?  Do we have any idea why that would be?  That just seems dishonest and liable to push customers away.

    10/15/13 at 3:24pm

    cacio said:



    As other said, houses almost never admit to reformulation, or if at all downplay it. Small reformulations can happen all the time, especially with natural materials whose characteristic can vary from year to year, and should be of no worry, if done well.

     

    But we're talking about reformulations that change a perfume in a substantial way. Two main reasons, one is substituting more expensive materials with cheaper ones, the other one, the most important in recent years, is because of IFRA regulations (many threads about this). A big IFRA regulation came into effect in 2010, so many fragrances changed around that year (oakmoss, jasmine, heliotropin, and more).

     

    I don't know what the specific reason for Amouage's change. I don't know whether any of the components of the original Lyric was restricted. Other Amouage perfumes have been reformulated. We know because several people have smelled vintage and current and have found them very different.

     

    cacio

    10/16/13 at 1:34am

    lpp said:



    There are often indications such as altered bottles or packaging, danieq.

    There are also serial number changes for those who keep track of these things - these may give clues.

    As cacio has stated, many changes are very subtle (and gradual), whilst others are not.

    10/16/13 at 7:45am

    danieq said:



    Thanks everyone for the explanation. So very much to learn about this hobby.

    10/16/13 at 10:36am

    Birdboy48 said:



    It's interesting that IFRA makes a big deal out of their regulations, and then perfume houses, who are the force behind IFRA, deny that they make any difference at all.

    10/16/13 at 1:34pm

    hedonist222 said:



    Le Labo has been very transparent and announced that Patchouli 24 was reformulated.

    Other houses should take note.

    10/16/13 at 2:12pm

    cacio said:



    Indeed, and it was actually one of the cases where the reformulation didn't matter much, as the current juice is still going strong.

     

    cacio

    10/16/13 at 3:05pm

    danieq said:



    Well good for Le Labo!  I'm actually looking at one of the fragrances now.  An honest company makes me more interested in supporting them.

    10/17/13 at 2:17am

    redrose said:



    A good reason to always sample before buying, even with a scent you think you know well, if that's possible. I've been very disappointed with the formulations of Paris, Mitsouko, L'Heure Bleue, and too many others to mention. Scents I've worn for many years and really thought I would wear for the rest of my life have been altered beyond recognition.

     

     Good for Le Labo, though!

    10/19/13 at 8:48am

    Birdboy48 said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by danieq View Post
     

    Well good for Le Labo!  I'm actually looking at one of the fragrances now.  An honest company makes me more interested in supporting them.

     

     

        It's a brave move alright, in that I suspect the vast majority of their customers don't know anything about the reformulation issue, and now they'll have to explain it to them.

     

       At the same time I feel the same as you do : That kind of honesty wins my admiration.

    10/19/13 at 9:53am

    30 Roses said:



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by redrose View Post
     

    A good reason to always sample before buying, even with a scent you think you know well, if that's possible....

     

    Sometimes the tester bottle is the older version, though, especially if the reformulation was recent.