Overtaking Cars, in your part of the world.

    Overtaking Cars, in your part of the world.

    post #1 of 35
    Thread Starter 
    When learning to drive in Australia, I was taught to overtake when the opposite lane was clear of oncoming traffic, and when it was safe to do so. Generally speaking, that's what happens in Australia, though sometimes someone misjudges distances, and I may have to brake slightly to give him or her time to finish overtaking.

    I find it disconcerting over here in Italy to notice that not infrequently, many drivers overtake when the road is not clear, and I have to brake hard to avoid having a head-on collision with the impatient overtaker.

    I can't help but think that this practice would lead to a lot of head-on collisions should the driver in my position be distracted slightly, by say a cell phone, or by kids making a racket in the back seat.

    Does this sort of aggressive overtaking, which requires braking by the driver on the opposite side of the road, occur with some degree of regularity in your part of the world?

    I guess it's sort of a game of chicken - you brake and let me in, or we both die.
    Regards,
    Renato
    post #2 of 35

    Indeed, we Italians tend to be quite risky on the streets, and I think the number of accidents is a proof of that. That said, I do remember many instances where an overtaking car was a little too uncomfortable, but I don't remember having to hit the brakes to avoid it (though perhaps memory has faded)

     

    cacio

    post #3 of 35

    That would never happen here. 

    post #4 of 35
    I second that. I'm from the motor city, so we already drive crazy enough
    post #5 of 35
    Happens sometimes,sure.
    post #6 of 35
    I have seen it happen from time to time also.
    post #7 of 35
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cacio View Post

    Indeed, we Italians tend to be quite risky on the streets, and I think the number of accidents is a proof of that. That said, I do remember many instances where an overtaking car was a little too uncomfortable, but I don't remember having to hit the brakes to avoid it (though perhaps memory has
    faded)

    cacio

    Thanks. As you and I know though, I am generalizing too much. I should be more specific as Italy is very diverse. My overtaking/braking experience relates to driving in Veneto. Whereas driving in Liguria seemed quite civilised compared to the aggression I see in Veneto. And I did see plenty of Police happily pulling over speeding drivers on autostradas in Emilia Romagna.
    Regards,
    Renato
    post #8 of 35
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by heperd View Post

    That would never happen here. 
    Good to know other places also don't have road bullies of this type.
    Renato
    post #9 of 35
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JJMAN View Post

    I second that. I'm from the motor city, so we already drive crazy enough
    So your area drives like crazy, but doesn't engage in this form of intimidation. Very interesting the contrast.
    Renato
    post #10 of 35
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dougczar View Post

    Happens sometimes,sure.
    I wonder what areas where this happens have in common, that leads to such risk taking behaviour?
    Renato
    post #11 of 35
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hednic View Post

    I have seen it happen from time to time also.

    Interesting, yet another such location where this happens in the world.
    Renato
    post #12 of 35
    I learned to drive in the U.S. and was taught to wait for a clear road in order to pass in the oncoming lane. While driving in Mexico I encountered lots of the "Italian style" of passing. Currently I live in a town where a medium size university is located and the students routinely engage in risky driving.
    post #13 of 35
    Thread Starter 
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Curly11 View Post

    I learned to drive in the U.S. and was taught to wait for a clear road in order to pass in the oncoming lane. While driving in Mexico I encountered lots of the "Italian style" of passing. Currently I live in a town where a medium size university is located and the students routinely engage in risky driving.

    Thanks. That's interesting to know. I know there's a big enclave of Veneto speakers in Mexico, I wonder who taught who how to overtake.
    Cheers,
    Renato
    post #14 of 35

    There is a lot of aggressive driving here: running red lights, overtaking at unsafe places in the road (despite the presence of the solid double line that prohibits overtaking),  gross speeding etc.  

    But not so much the "playing chicken" that you describe, Renato.  

    post #15 of 35

    To be fair its ok here - like everywhere you can get some crazy drivers but on the most part people are pretty sensible

    post #16 of 35

    Here in Chicago, we have Amber Alert-style signs over the highways that announce the number of traffic-related fatalities to-date for the year.  When I last saw it on Monday, it read 800.  I haven't grown immune to what that number represents. I have yet to look at that sign and not check myself to make sure that I'm driving prudently.

     

    After losing a loved one to a distracted driver three years ago, I understand too well what happens when people act stupidly behind the wheel for the wrong split second.  After his death, we drove to court every month for over two years to engage in the agonizing process of "justice", only to be handed a verdict that brought no peace.   

     

    I never want to be in the position of the young man who struck Alex because I was fiddling with my cell phone (like 75% of the drivers here), or late, or too tired, or trying to teach a lesson to a driver who cut me off.  None of that garbage is worth it and I'm so saddened to see drivers engage in high-risk behaviors because of their own lack of insight and impulse control. 

    post #17 of 35

    How devastating, Schilling!  And you are absolutely right-- it just isn't worth it.  

    post #18 of 35