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    • deadidol

      Features
      Published on 28th February 2014 01:53 PM

      Given the IFRA’s increasing chokehold on some of perfumery’s most commonly used materials, the fragrance industry has found itself at somewhat of a crux. Reformulations of countless classics have stripped them of their original charisma, and perfumers and creative directors alike have publicly voiced concern over their ability to work within such progressively challenging confines. On the one hand, this has led to the escalation of exciting guerrilla and underground perfumery; on the other, it has necessitated a greater effort to forge ahead with new materials and resources. Consequently, what has emerged is a time for reflection upon perfume’s historic development as a method by which to diagram the path ahead. And now, for U.S.-based perfumers, this capacity to reflect has been enriched through transatlantic access to the fragrance world’s greatest archive, allowing for the ability to sniff back through history in order to look toward the future.
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