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    • Marian Bendeth

      Features
      by Published on 19th March 2013 01:31 PM

      In this article, Global Fragrance Expert, Marian Bendeth takes a look at the etiquette of wearing perfume...

      You have to love those special days when you wake up with a splitting headache and your stomach is in war mode with last night's dodgy restaurant meal . You drag your body early in the morning to the local bus/subway and are lucky to find an empty double seat.

      No sooner do you settle in than a sickly hurricane of fragrance fumes and it's accompanying body invade the next seat. They shift around in the air, wafting piquant waves up the nose to the heart of nausea. ...
      Features
      by Published on 9th November 2011 05:46 AM

      Walking in gilded shoes can be a rich and prized role but can also weigh heavily on the wearer. Three years ago, Basenotes interviewed the then newly appointed perfumer, Thierry Wasser, who was plucked and handpicked from the rich gene pool of perfumers to head up the prestigious House of Guerlain.

      He has had three years to adapt and create fragrances, oversee not only the makeup and skincare fragrance formulations but also maintain the integrity of the company’s valuable investments in raw materials, a role that has been fascinating and challenging.


      What has been of great significance is the role Wasser has played in the cultivation and resurrection of defunct farms and fields in the raw materials sector. Through his travels, he has been able to create or revive precious bespoke materials in underdeveloped countries giving local farmers a new lease on life.

      The job of overseeing not only the creation, but also the launches and successes within the stable of Guerlain products, has made for a very unique role.

      The personal “father/son” relationship with the last surviving Guerlain forefather, Jean-Paul Guerlain, (whose sudden departure in October 2010) left a rich legacy between the two men of trusted reciprocity, invention and creativity.

      We catch up with Wasser to find out how his journey has unfolded over the past three years.
      ...
      Features
      by Published on 1st July 2010 08:07 AM


      Canada has more than just a few perfume secrets to share.

      Outside of its thriving retail fragrance industry and Fragrance Award Shows, its relationship with the perfume industry goes back to the raw wilderness in 1670 and the then, newly created Hudson’s Bay Company whose sole focus was the Fur Trade. One of the most expensive byproducts of trapping, was the prized Castoreum, notes of (glandular Beaver sac) which found their way back to Europe and into the Perfumer’s palette. Many European Royals and gentry found this note intoxicating when mixed with local flowers.
      ...
      Features
      by Published on 15th April 2009 01:01 AM



      Seeking and living out the titillation of romance and love relationships is as human as breathing. This choreography of the heart is the sustenance of human attraction and with each partner we choose, and where the ego searches to have it's needs met and bolstered, the love dance is ever evolving.

      Ironically, this pursuit of physical bonding ...
      Features
      by Published on 11th December 2008 11:00 PM

      Editor's note: These interviews are the final part of a series in which Marian Bendeth explores what a panel of modern perfumers would say if they could travel back to the time of their choosing, to meet, chat and co-create with a perfumer of the past. An introduction to the series and table of contents is here.

       


      Mathilde Laurent

      In-House Perfumer, Cartier Parfums

      Creations: Bespoke Perfumer for Cartier Parfums, Roadster by Cartier, Attrape-Coeur La Maison Guerlain, Aqua Allégoria: Ylang Ylang et Vanille, Pamplelune, Herba Fresca, Rosa Magnifica (more...)

      Marian: If it was possible to travel back in time to any particular century and decade of your choice to meet your number one inspirational Perfumer:

      When would that be and who would you like to meet?

      ML: Around 1915. To try out this era of pure creation, and this feeling of the early history of perfume. I would like to meet François Coty for his genius and Jacques Guerlain to confront what I believe to have included/understood of him by so much that I have sought it at Guerlain!

      MB
      : What specific questions would you want to ask them?

      I wish I could watch them at work, see their methods, their manias, understand their specific approach and their vision of perfume.

      MB: If you could team up together in that time period, who would you like to co-create a fragrance for?

      Camille Claudel (French sculptor and graphic artist) for her sensitivity, creativity, and amazing modernity for her century.

      MB: If you could bring anything back with you, what would that be?

      The virginity of the 'market' at that time, it did not have as much olfactive hubbub there!!!! The perfume was a true element of luxury, it had not become a product like so often today.


      Thierry Wasser

      In-House Perfumer, Parfums Guerlain

      Creations: Guerlain Homme, Diesel Fuel for Life Pour Femme , Hypnose Lancome, Emporio Armani Diamonds, Fendi Palazzo, Iris Ganache Guerlain, Quand Vient la Pluie, Dior Addict & Eau Fraiche, Truth Calvin Klein (more...)

      MB: If it was possible to travel back in time to any particular century and decade of your choice to meet your number one inspirational Perfumer:?

      When would that be and who would you like to meet?

      TW: It would be between the two Wars - WWI and WWII in the 20th century. Just after the industrial revolution, the whole world was yet to be discovered and I think the creativity of the arts, especially in Paris with the Ballet Russes with inventions of every kind, through improvising the lines for furniture etc. was so exciting.

      Who would I like to meet? Of course, Jacques ...

      Features
      by Published on 24th November 2008 11:00 PM

      Editor's note: These interviews are the penultimate part of a series in which Marian Bendeth explores what a panel of modern perfumers would say if they could travel back to the time of their choosing, to meet, chat and co-create with a perfumer of the past. An introduction to the series and table of contents is here.

       

      Evelyne Boulanger

      Perfumer, Symrise

      Creations:
      Soleil Blue - Yves Rocher, Shamballa by Andre Sinan, Amouage Silver ColgoneGivrine E. Coudray [more...]

      Marian: If it was possible to  travel back in time to any particular century and decade of your choice to meet your number one inspirational Perfumer:

      When would that be and who would you meet?

      Evelyne Boulanger: If I had the opportunity to go back in time aboard an old machine like "Back to the Future", I would materialize in 1945-1946. I  would go to  see a woman perfumer who impresses me greatly both in her creations and personality.

      I would go see a woman perfumer who impresses me greatly both in his creations as his personality, and this woman of genius, is Germaine Cellier!

      What questions would I ask her? I do not know, I think in a small way, I would love to watch how she lives, laughs, fulminates her craft.  I would see how she would work in complete freedom, without coercion, (she knew office hours!), I would weigh her formulas to find if they were very short but very colorful. Among these I would have to include the French perfumery greats Vent Vert, Bandit and many others .... . But this Bandit, what genius!

      M: If you could team up together in that time period, who would you like to co-create a fragrance for?

      EB: I would like to discover the artist perfumer, but also one who loved to be surrounded by painters, sculptors, mythical figures as Jean Cocteau. And of course, if I had worked with Germaine, and with her agreement, I would love to work on Bandit with her as well.

      M: If you could bring anything back with you, what would that be?

      EB: If I had to bring something this time: a hat, one of her many hats she wore with such elegance ....


       

      Patricia Choux

      Senior Perfumer, Symrise

      Creations: Clive Christian No 1 for Men, No 1 for Women, X for Women1872 for Women, Marc Jacobs Splash Orange (with Maurice Roucel), Jo Malone Blue Agava, Very Pretty Michael Kors, Baby Phat Seductive Goddess, Laura Mercier Marons Glaces [more...]


      MB: If it was possible to travel back in time to any particular century and decade of your choice to meet your number one inspirational Perfumer:?

      When would that be and who would you like to meet?


      Patricia Choux:
      It would be in the Twentieth Century in the early 1900’s, ‘les Annees Folles’.

      I would have loved to have met with Gabrielle Chanel and François Coty. They were avant-gardist’s with their creativity and works. Coco Chanel created, in her time,  a revolution! She changed the establishment, ...

      Features
      by Published on 10th November 2008 11:00 PM

      The Summer of 2000 was an exciting and challenging time for the fragrance industry on both sides of the counter. The heat of this new millennium found fragrance houses and perfumers twisting themselves to cope with the loss of some materials, as well as manufacturing a plethora of flanker brands to try and sustain their core customers as well as gain new perfumistas as clients.

      Trying to get your hands on some pertinent and timely fragrance data left collectors and the media rummaging through every attainable magazine interview; traipsing to the local library for books and international magazine coverage, beauty television guest spots and newspaper sources. Somewhere in some back office, fragrance marketers were sniffing the potential of the internet which held the promise of lower advertising costs and reaching a wider consumer base but finding a website devoted solely to perfume was a challenge...

      The pickings of fragrance websites were slim. One could read some great fragrance articles on Jasmin.com (now a sex show website), Todd Bennett AKA The Cologne Guy and Perfume2000.com, (a comprehensive fragrance site mainly for industry people with a budget for a subscription.) The term “blogging” was just a few keystrokes away but the perfume media landscape needed some serious excavation and development.

      It was surprising to see the internet lacking so greatly in this area until I discovered a fledgling website called Basenotes. One could find the latest fragrance launches, tips, interesting articles and opinions and I had to contact the owner, Grant Osborne to compliment him on his innovation. It was obvious that this was going to be the wave of the future in perfume proliferation. The site was mainly a Grooming/Fragrance website with a clever Faq column answering all the fragrance questions in a fun and informative way. Grant’s approach was so unique and useful that in eight short years, Basenotes was to become one of the most prolific and respected fragrance websites in the world!

      Osborne’s roots started behind the fragrance counter at Boots, the UK’s answer to Sephora and the prototype for many pharmacies selling perfumes with their self-serve displays around the world. Osborne’s passion and talents for fragrances coupled with the knowledge of heavy players in the perfume industry and great editorial and computer skills led to the inevitable.

      After some hounding and persistence, I was finally able to finally interview the modest owner behind the scenes for a revealing look at his views and website:

       

      MB: Hello Grant, I have so many questions to ask you so I will start at the beginning. I am curious to know when was your first exposure to fragrance? How old were you?

      GO: I think I was about seven. An uncle gave me an old bottle of aftershave that he didn't use any more. I've no idea what it was, May have been something from Shulton. I didn't think much of it at the time. I used to get it out of my socks drawer every now and again for a sniff. I would sometimes daub a bit on which made me feel like a grown up.

       

      MB: When did you actually start collecting and wearing fragrances?

      GO: Not until I started selling it really. Until then, it was just something I wore going out in the evening. Until I started selling it, when I went out, my big decision was: Jazz – Yves Saint Laurent or XS – Paco Rabanne. Must have had a thing ...

      Features
      by Published on 12th October 2008 10:19 AM

      Editor's note: These interviews are the thirteenth part of a series in which Marian Bendeth explores what a panel of modern perfumers would say if they could travel back to the time of their choosing, to meet, chat and co-create with a perfumer of the past. An introduction to the series and table of contents is here.

      Aurélien Guichard

      Perfumer, Givaudan

      Creations: Andy Warhol Silver Factory, Aqua Allegoria Anisa Bella, Baghari & Visa (reworked) Robert Piguet, Love in Paris by Nina Ricci, Moon Sparkle for Men by Escada, Sean John - Unforgivable, Gucci by Gucci for Men, John Galliano, Comme des Garcons - Play (more...)

      MB: If it was possible to travel back in time to any particular century and decade of your choice to meet your number one inspirational Perfumer:

      When would that be and who would you meet.

      AG: In 2108.....in the future.

      I am not a nostalgic creator... I would dream of being a futuristic perfumer.

      Perfume creations follow the culture, the money and other arts developed by the dominating civilizations.

      This evolution has always been going from the East to the West.... just like the 'sun road'. It started with Egypt , then Greece (in antiquity), then Florence during the Renaissance, France and Grasse in the early 1800- 1900's, New York in the late 1990-2000... always going west.... so where is the future of CREATIONS? Perfumers working in pairs with designers, couturiers and trend setters....

      Today, consumers are more and more educated in fragrances... therefore, they are able to differentiate a true great creation from an average one.

      I believe the best time to be a perfumer is coming... it is not in the past, it is in the future.

      MB: Who would you meet?

      An open minded perfumer, a visionaire who believes in uniqueness...

      a perfumer who believes in the future more than in the past....

      a perfumer who believes in new fragrances created for new trends, new fashions....

      a perfumer who creates for people wanting to be different and beautiful, ultra feminine, ultra masculine, ultra gay, ultra classic, ....

      a perfumer who is not working by consumer tests but for consumer happiness.

      and more importantly a perfumer who has dreams.

      MB: What specific questions would you want to ask them?

      What make this job the best in the world in 2108?

      Will there be more room for instinctive creation and less for rational ones?

      How about more trust and teamwork between brand and perfumers (no secrets on formulas: 'open formulas')?

      Will there involve more fun in the development process (come on!: we are only creating fragrances, it will never change the face of the earth)?

      And at the end: will there be a better product therefore greater honor to do this job?

      MB: If you could team up together in that time period, who would you like to co-create a fragrance for?

      I would want to team up and create a fragrance for someone who understands the needs and the aesthetics of its time.... it can be anytime; what matters to me is to create emotions; it could be for a couturier or a musician or a painter etc. I would work for trendsetters - people who capture (with their art) "l'air du temps": being different and contemporary; by using both 'avant-gardism' and pure beauty of its? time.

      MB: If you could bring anything back with you, what would that be?

      New raw materials!

      Thanks to research and technology: there will be a larger palette of ingredients. Perfumers will have more freedom to create unique fragrances: New natural species, that perfumers will be able to use without restrictions (new species without allergens).

      New synthetics and molecules discovered by chemists.

      There will be new ways to wear fragrances: fragrance encapsulations, fragrance clothes....

       

       

      Stephen Nilsen

      Senior Perfumer, Givaudan ...

      Features
      by Published on 22nd September 2008 02:21 PM

      Editor's note: These interviews are the eleventh part of a series in which Marian Bendeth explores what a panel of modern perfumers would say if they could travel back to the time of their choosing, to meet, chat and co-create with a perfumer of the past. An introduction to the series and table of contents is here.

       

       

      Cécile Krakower

      Perfumer, Mane

      Creations: Hard Candy, Gap Washed Cotton and Velvet Bloom, Gendarme Envious, Abercrombie & Fitch 8, Yu by Perfect Sense / Mane, Mac MV3 , Laura Mercier L'Heure Magique (more...)

      MB: If it was possible to travel back in time to any particular century and decade of your choice to meet your number one inspirational Perfumer:

      When would that be and who would you meet?

      CK: Believe it or not, I find more exciting to project myself in the future and work today on shaping a better tomorrow: where fragrance design will be given back the attention it deserves. At least, this is what I am dreaming of, to help me deal with how it's done today.

      My heroes are the people who try to stay true to their vision despite the industry and its pressure, the ones fighting against soulless products, the ones making sure there is a connection between the juice, the name, the packaging and the positioning: anybody who loves the product enough to make sure it will be done right. How do you expect an emotional response to a product that you don't love yourself?

      MB: What specific questions would you want to ask?

      What is the next step we can take together to end the era of fragrance as a disposable commodity?

      MB: If you could team up together in that time period, who would you like to co-create a fragrance for?

      It doesn't really matter which name will be on the bottle as long as the design was done in complete partnership. Sure, perfumers have their own olfactive visions, thousands of ideas, but what is also extremely exciting and challenging is to put together scents that will answer somebody else's wish and see them connect. Anybody with a love for fragrance is enough for inspiration: seeing their eyes sparkle at first sniff is priceless.?

      MB: If you could bring anything back with you, what would that be?

      I wish we had bottled the courage it took Coco Chanel to design women's pants, François Coty to come up with 'Chypre', Frida Kahlo to be who she was so we can all drink from it. Hopefully Vera Strubi didn't drink it all when she launched Angel!

       

      Karine Chevallier

      Perfumer, Olfactive Design

      Creations: ...

      Features
      by Published on 22nd August 2008 11:00 PM

      Editor's note: These interviews are the eleventh part of a series in which Marian Bendeth explores what a panel of modern perfumers would say if they could travel back to the time of their choosing, to meet, chat and co-create with a perfumer of the past. An introduction to the series and table of contents is here.

      James Krivda

      Senior Perfumer, Mane

      Creations: Deseo by Jennifer Lopez, Fantasy by Britney Spears, Pure Moment by Alfred Sung, FCUK Him/Her, Enchanting by Celine Dion, Bijan Black for Him and for Her [more...]

      Marian Bendeth: If it was possible to travel back in time to any particular century and decade of your choice to meet your number one inspirational Perfumer:

      When would that be and who would you meet?


      James Krivda: I actually believe right here and now is a very exciting time in perfumery...yes a century ago times were "heady" with new discoveries and creating all the fragrances that we are all familiar with today. But now we are building upon that groundwork with so many exciting materials available to the perfumers from across the globe it is exciting times indeed! Also not only do we have a bountiful of materials to inspire us, we are much more responsible in how we are collecting and processing naturals with sustainable programs and our commitment to fair trade. With synthetics we have a bounty of new materials that we know are safe for the consumer and friendlier to the planet.

      With all this exciting research, perfumers are able to create a huge range of very diverse fragrances for every customer's needs. In the 90's and this century we have seen an explosion of creativity in fragrances...Tresor, Eternity, Cool Water, Angel, La Male, Pleasures, Aqua di Gio, Light Blue in fine fragrance. Companies like Bath and Body Works have brought high quality fragrances to all consumers for everyday splashes with sun ripened Raspberries, Cucumber Melon, Cotton Blossom, Warm Vanilla Sugar and now moving more and more into a finer fragrance arena with Velvet Tuberose. We now even see this trickling down into the consumer products arena with all the Febreze scents and the explosion of new fabric softener fragrances!

      Today we are blessed with some of the most talented perfumers that have ever lived...I have been honored to work with many, know a few and some I have never met but know by their incredible work...My mentor Elie Roger was a great perfumer in the classic French methods one of his disciples and a perfumer who also trained me was Annie Buzantian. Harry Fremont, Dave Apel, Jacques Cavalier, Pierre Bourdon, Albert Morrilas and Oliver Cresp are others that I have been honored to work with. Other amazing perfumers we are lucky to have today include: Sophia Grojsman and we are also lucky to work with other creative voices that, although not perfumers, inspire and work with us, such as Ann Gottleib, Karyn Khoury and Camille McDonald.

      MB: What specific questions would you want ...

      Features
      by Published on 11th August 2008 02:25 AM

      It must feel a bit daunting when you receive an honourable request to be heir apparent to one of the most celebrated French Perfume and Cosmetics Houses in the world!  Especially when you are not a blood relative of the perfumed peerage Guerlain family.   Since 1828, there have been four Guerlain Perfumers running the house.  Jean-Paul Guerlain, the surviving "Nose" for the House is without heirs and sold the company to LVMH in 1994.  Although he officially retired in 2002, he will still continue to be an Advisor and Counselor to the Presidency and will continue to offer creative counsel in future projects.

      The powers on high: prolific and celebrated Master Perfumer Jean-Paul Guerlain,  LVMH top Perfumer and Supervisor, François Demachy and Guerlain CEO Laurent Boillot all appear to have zero reservations and every faith, when they invited Thierry Wasser to become the new In-House Perfumer and pilot the illustrious House into the 21st Century.

      Wasser is no amateur when it comes to the industry.  Before receiving his Botany Diploma at age 20 and after graduating from the perfumery school at Givaudan at age 24, his stints with the House and competitor, Firmenich S.A. resulted in the creation of some top fragrance heavy-hitters such as:  Dior AddictHypnôse for Women and Men , Chopard for men, Jil Sander Man, Lacoste Hot Play, Fendi Palazzo and cult classics – Jaguar and Salvador Dali Men. His most recent  Diesel Fuel for Life Pour Femme was a finalist in both the European and US FiFi Awards, 2008.

      I was very excited to hear that Thierry Wasser could find the time to do a interview with me, even by phone from his home in Paris to discuss his latest role as In-House Perfumer for Parfums Guerlain. The legacy of this incredible House stretches all the way back to 1853 and to the founder and Perfumer, Pierre-François Pascal Guerlain whose ancestors have molded and shaped the way we blend and wear perfumes today.


      Jean-Paul Guerlain with Thierry Wasser ...
      Features
      by Published on 8th August 2008 11:00 PM

      Editor's note: These interviews are the tenth part of a series in which Marian Bendeth explores what a panel of modern perfumers would say if they could travel back to the time of their choosing, to meet, chat and co-create with a perfumer of the past. An introduction to the series and table of contents is here.

       

       

      Nathalie Feisthauer

      Senior Perfumer, Symrise

      Creations: Innocent Rock by Mugler; Etat Libre d’Orange: Putain des Palaces and Delicious Closet Queen; Di Romeo GigliEau des Merveilles; Kouros Tatoo Energizing; Guerrilla 2 by Commes des Garcons (more...)

      Marian Bendeth: If it was possible to  travel back in time to any particular century and decade of your choice to meet your number one inspirational Perfumer:

      When would that be? Please state century and decade


      Nathalie Feisthauer: I chose to talk about the late eighties and nineties in the United States.

      MB:
      Who would that be?

      NF: Sophia Grojsman at IFF and Anne Gottleib

      Before this time, the Europeans, not to say the just French fragrance industry were clearly dominating the creation process and had almost all the most beautiful brands.  The only real big exception was Estee Lauder and it's early collaboration with IFF.

      It was then,  for the first time, that  I sensed that the creativity shift geographically and came from the new world.   For me, there were two  main powerhouses, Sophia Grojsman and Ann Gottlieb both based in NYC. Together, they united their work, talent, techniques and tastes to open new roads in perfumery. Their work involved new aesthetics, new ways to write a formula, new ways to diffuse and therefore to "read" a fragrance at a beauty bar.  At this time, the French were  proposing a long fresh top note for a perfumer to take the time to know what really smells like a perfume after a while based on the base notes. The Americans understood that you only have 30 seconds to pick your fragrances (and most importantly to buy!!) so you better have the message to send about the style and notes right away!

      I was at this time a young perfumer (25 in 1990!) i was sent there for four years, and I thought I had come from the best country,  the best company to learn the "know how" of perfumes, so maybe i was a little like the the French stereotype,  a little bit arrogant , obnoxious.  But I was still there to learn and in a way, i was lucky, since I felt that something huge was happening.  For the first time creativity and newness came from the Americans and more specifically, from Sophia's perfumery which was a new way to work for me;  to know as a true ...

      Features
      by Published on 21st July 2008 11:00 PM

      Editor's note: These interviews are the eighth part of a series in which Marian Bendeth explores what a panel of modern perfumers would say if they could travel back to the time of their choosing, to meet, chat and co-create with a perfumer of the past. An introduction to the series and table of contents is here.

       

      Rodrigo Flores-Roux

      Senior Perfumer, Givaudan

      Creations: Donna Karan Essence Wenge Wood, John Varvatos, Cordoroy, Zirh, With Love Hillary Duff (pictured), Black Cashmere Donna Karan (more...)

      Marian Bendeth: If it was possible to travel back in time to any particular century and decade of your choice to meet your number one inspirational Perfumer:

      When would that be? Please state century and decade :


      Rodrigo Flores-Roux:
      Although one may be tempted to answer your questions going back in time and reaching far into Egypt, Moorish Spain, Renaissance Florence, etc, I would like these thoughts to be a bit more concrete, taking a shorter step back in history, just 70 or 80 years ago, and landing in the middle of the 20's or 30's...

      I have always felt very passionate about classical French perfumes, and I found that the creativity that reigned in our industry in France starting in the 20's was, to say the lest, completely unleashed. Les Annees Folles were a crucible of ideas. Fashion took its shape as an important industry, and so did fine perfumery.

      Proto-marketing trends could be spotted, fragrances became conceptual (there were "bandit", "aventure", "fleeting time", "coeur en folie", "revolte" etc... instead of "rose", "violet", "bergamotte" or "mimosa") and a perfume launch would undoubtedly include the work  of not only very creative perfumers, but also, of famous graphic designers, painters, illustrators, photographers, sculptors etc. Names like Mucha, Sonia Delaunay, Picasso, Dali, Leonor Fini, Christian Berard, Raoul Dufy, Fernand Leger, Marie Laurencin, Bakst, Gruau, etc come to mind...

      Who would that be?

      So, if you ask me which perfumer I would I like to meet, I must answer with the name of a man who was not only incredibly knowledgeable in perfume creation, but who also had an incredible imagination and was able to inspire his colleague/designer (and his lover?) to invent some of the most formidable, exquisitely concocted perfumes that are also standouts in  visual aesthetics... and even more, some of them are considered revolutionary in their conceptualization: I am talking about the founder of the house of Caron, Ernest Daltroff, and also, about Madame Felicie Bergaud (née Vanpouille), his designer and twin soul...

      The House of Caron opened in the beginning of the 20th century, and it is early on that this creative duo understood that a perfume was more an idea or a feeling, than a concrete image or portrait. In the span of 25 years, just before WWII, although they had launched a "Violette Precieuse" and invented a black narcissus ("le Narcisse Noir"), their ideas evolved into a festival of roses ("La fete des roses"), ...

      Features
      by Published on 8th July 2008 11:00 PM

      Editor's note: These interviews are the eighth part of a series in which Marian Bendeth explores what a panel of modern perfumers would say if they could travel back to the time of their choosing, to meet, chat and co-create with a perfumer of the past. An introduction to the series and table of contents is here.

       

      Maurice Roucel

      Senior Perfumer, Symrise

      Creations: X-Centric Dunhill, Musc Ravageur Dans tes Bras, Lalique Pour Homme Lion,  24 Faubourg, Gucci Envy, Iris Silver Mist, Riverside Drive, Jasmin 17 Le Labo, L'Instant de Guerlain, Missoni, Insolence (more...)

      Marian Bendeth: If it was possible to  travel back in time to any particular century and decade of your choice to meet your number one inspirational Perfumer:

      When would that be? Who would that be? 


      Roucel: It would be the early part of the Twentieth Century to meet François Coty!  This would be the best gift a perfumer could receive! The man was a genius.

      I would love to spend some time with him and share a lot of ideas and inspirations. I have a lot of respect for this man, he was a  creator of so many incredible things! Not only perfumery but as a businessman as well!  I think of the Tax Free market, different classifications, marketing concepts, the list goes on and on. So many modern perfumers are still inspired by him, and his classifications which you can still find in modern perfumes today!.

      MB: If you could team up together in that time period, who would you like to co-create a fragrance for?

      Maybe Coco Chanel,  but I would also like to watch him create Émeraude or the Premier Muguet – ah Wow, fabulous! or the great ...

      Features
      by Published on 6th July 2008 11:00 PM

       Editor's note: These interviews are the seventh part of a series in which Marian Bendeth explores what a panel of modern perfumers would say if they could travel back to the time of their choosing, to meet, chat and co-create with a perfumer of the past. An introduction to the series and table of contents is here.

      Jean-Michel Duriez

      In-house perfumer, Jean Patou

      Creations: Enjoy, Un Amour, Yohji Essential, Lacoste for Women, Yohji Homme, Sira des Indes (more...)

      Marian Bendeth: If it was possible to travel back in time to any particular century and decade of your choice to meet your number one inspirational Perfumer:

      When would that be? Please state century and decade


      Jean-Michel Duriez: The story tells that in 1380, in Hungary, the Queen aged 70, infirmed and sick, received from a monk a potion to drink and use on the skin. That potion was made of Aqua Vitae (i.e. a refined alcohol coming from the distillation of wines) added to Rosemary, Marjoram and Sage. She received so many fantastic benefits from that potion that later on, she married the King of Poland who fell in love for her youth and healthy character.

      That was the beginning of an era when monks and nuns made what people called “Miraculous Water”. In the 17th century, after decades of production in monasteries and convents, one of those, located in Santa Maria Novella in Florence was producing the “Aqua Regina”, mainly made of citrus fruits coming from Italia. That “Eau” was much appreciated for its properties on health and beauty. One day, an Italian dealer called Gian Paolo Feminis, living in Germany in Cologne (Köln) was very much interested in finding the recipe of that well-appreciated product. He convinced one the nuns to give him the secret recipe and took it back to Cologne where ...

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