Fueguia 1833 : Perfumes from Patagonia [News from Pitti]

by Lila Das Gupta, 16th September, 2012

Reflecting the international theme of this year’s Fragranze Pitti Imagine , a new exhibitor is the Argentinian perfume house Fueguia 1833, based in Buenos Aires. The company, was started two years ago by Julian Bedel (who has a background in music) and Amalia Amoedo, and is a tribute to the flora and fauna of Patagonia, the southern parts of Chile and Argentina which includes the Straights of Magellan, separating the continent from Tierra del Fuego. Bedel is decended from a line of distinguished entomologists and writers - two of his ancestors specialised in the study of beetles.

The recently opened Fueguia 1833 shop, in a leafy suburb of Buenos Aires, also contains the firm’s laboratory where perfumes can be made semi-bespoke for customers. The company’s corporate clients include the Four Seasons Hotel, Park Hyatt Hotel, Emirates Airways and others in the travel and leisure sector.

The opening collection has 50 fragrances divided into sub groups, each of which is follows a theme.

1. Jorge Luis Borges (writer)

2. Destinos (places)

3. Personajes (people)

4. Fábula Fauna (fabulous fauna)

5. Linneo (after Carl Linnaeus, the father of taxonomy)

6. Amalia (Honouring the beauty of women)

7.Armonías (harmonies/ music)

The line takes a cerebral approach when it comes inspiration: offerings include the imagined smell of Darwin’s cabin on his voyage to Patagonia, as well as a celebration of the love affair (platonic or otherwise) that developed between Bengali poet Rabindranarath Tagore and writer Victoria Ocampo when he came to stay in Argentina.

The collection is also available in candles. The perfumes come in special hand-made boxes from native species of wood that come from fallen trees in the “Valdiviano” forest in Patagonia. They are made by students from a local carpentry school.

The name ‘Fueguia’ is taken from a sad event in Patagonian history. Fueguia Basket was a young girl of around 12 when she was taken to London as one of four ‘savages’ by Captain Fitzroy with the purpose of turning them into ‘civilised’ creatures. The intention was these four would then be brought back to teach the natives ‘educated’ and ‘Christian’ ways.

After two years in England, the experiment was deemed unsuccessful and Fitzroy took the natives back on the ship under his command, the HMS Beagle. It was on this famous return voyage that he was accompanied by the naturalist Charles Darwin, who later used much of his research on the trip to write The Origin of Species. (The story of the two men’s relationship is the theme of a novel by Harry Thompson called ‘This Thing of Darkness’). The fate of Fueguia was an unfortunate one – after marrying another of the captives when she returned to Patagonia she lived a very hard life. None of the captives were accepted back into their community with ease and were treated with suspicion and distrust.

“Our work is a homage to the flora and fauna of the area’ said a company spokesman. “In a way, we see ourselves as carrying on the work of Darwin. We seek to identify new plant materials from the region that haven’t been used as perfumery before or are very uncommon.’

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Comments

    • michailG | 16th September 2012 09:01

      Fueguia 1833 sounds very interesting. I am happy that this niche fragrance maker comes from Argentina and not the usual hubs. Unfortunately, their website is nothing more than their business card. Does anyone know where to look for descriptions and samples of their creations? I guess it is impossible to find them in Scandinavia. Nice presentation. Thank you Lila!

    • Bonoanimoes | 16th September 2012 11:09

      Hello Lila, you can find them at Campo Marzio in Rome as well,

      http://www.campomarzio70.it/modx/it

      I have smelled them briefly and this line seems very interesting, I am not quite sure if you will obtain the samples from campomarzio 70, nonetheless, I advise you to drop them an e-mail.

      Cheers,

    • Lila Das Gupta | 16th September 2012 13:42

      I spoke to Natasha Blin - you can e-mail her on [email][email protected][/email]

    • nailuj | 16th September 2012 20:10

      Thank you for the great article Lila.

      Fueguia 1833 ships worldwide, you can download the catalog (Spanis & English versions) from:

      http://www.fueguia.com/catalogo/

      The catalog includes the full story, manufacturing process, ingredients, photos and the 50+ range of perfume collection with details and explanations. It's worth the download!

      Best,

      Nailuj

    • Grant | 16th September 2012 20:22

      Thank you for the information.

    • MonkeyBars | 17th September 2012 02:54

      This article gave me chills with those descriptions of the inspiration. I hope the nose(s) behind the actual products are as great as the concepts.

    • Birdboy48 | 20th September 2012 23:58

      It's great to see a company coming from this part of the world, but this trend, where unknown companies start out with over 50 offerings makes Bond and Montale seem like small-timers in the over-frag world.

    • nailuj | 22nd September 2012 17:14

      The brand in fact it's a distillation laboratory, perfume factory with an in house perfumist and also a retail brand with stores of their own. They are having a big fun!

      Take a look at http://www.facebook.com/fueguia

      Cheers,

      N.

    • ednafrau | 22nd September 2012 21:42

      thank you Lila for the wonderful article, and nailuj for the additional info! being a perfume lover in buenos aires, i am SO happy to discover a brand such as Fueguia...i can't wait to be able to visit their store on Alvear Avenue (i went the other day but got there too late: they'd just closed :()

    • GelbeDomino | 25th September 2012 02:14

      I was glad to see Fueguia at Pitti. They have some pretty impressive stuff and their candles are of great quality.

      My favorites from the line include Fitz Roy (a beautiful violet for gentlemen), Caoba (patchouli, cacao and Bulgarian rose) and Ballena de la Pampa (musk and hay).