Michael Edwards launches 2006 version of industry bible, Fragrances of the World

by Grant Osborne, 08th March, 2006

Michael Edwards' industry bible, Fragrances of the World is now available for 2006. Containing listings of over 4,500 prestige, niche, mass-market, travel retail and limited edition fragrances listed by house and fragrance family. 499 new fragrances are included for the 2006 edition. An ideal reference for retailers, perfumers, and perfume lovers and it is so easy to use.

The book has an online accompaniment, FragrancesOfTheWorld.Info. It contains all the information in the book, but allows you to sort fragrances by gender, country, year of launch, brand, parent company and contains information on the notes, perfumers, bottle designer of each scent. It won a FiFi award for Technological Breakthrough.

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Comments

    • kaos.geo | 8th March 2006 21:06

      I took the virtual tour of the site.

      It is discouraging though that the subscription fee is almost 600 u$s.

      I live in Argentina, where the dollar is 3 to 1, the price is outrageous.

      I know this might appeal to indusry-types, but to a fan of fragrances, it is simply out of my range (my monthly salary does not get near that sum)

      That is why I think that Basenotes is relevant and important for people like me, and I know that there is a lot of us around the world.

      This year I will contribute to Basenotes, a small sum, but what my budget permits.

      It would be really encouraging that, with it's many supporters, Basenotes made faster updates to it's lists, i.e.: I added a H2O+ fragrance on early january and still is not on the list.

      Long live Basenotes!! ;-)

    • viktorov | 9th March 2006 09:53

      The price is a big putoff, but as the target-group is retailers I assume that they can afford that.

      Not for me though.

      Long live basenotes!

    • iMaverick | 11th March 2006 10:35

      I have the same opinion on the subscription price of the website...thanks for something that I could find for no money at all on popular blogs, websites, and other industry sites for FREE.

    • shifts | 13th March 2006 10:02

      Well, the price of the book isn't that outrageous and I could see myself paying around $100 for something like that easily.

    • Andrew_B. | 1st April 2006 02:54

      I wish the web site "demo" of the book was large enough for me to actually see some content. If seeing that impressed me, I might go for it.

    • Andrew_B. | 13th April 2006 01:34

      I got a look at this book in Sophora. I found it very user-unfriendly. The layout is difficult to navigate and read, and with so much white space shining at me, I had trouble focusing on the page. I asked the sales woman if she found it helpful, and she said that nobody there found it easy to use, or really that helpful to them in helping customers. But better than nothing. I think I'll give it a pass.

    • Strange Accord | 18th April 2006 04:34

      It is awfully expensive. BUT so educational! I decided that I would pay $600 to have the opportunity to take a good class on fragrance. (The public university in my city charges $350 for 3 credits). I don't have the opportunity to take a class on fragrance, per se, so this seemed like a good alternative.

      I subscribed about two months ago and it has been as educational as I would hope $600 or so would be. I know some people flat out cannot afford this. But for others, looking at it from certain perspective, it makes sense as an educational cost.

      I don't know how long I will subscribe, maybe three years. It is a remarkable resource.

      I have appreciated having a "master" guide me when I try a fragrance. It is definately helping me to become sensitized to individual fragrance notes.

      I like being able to look at the ouvre of specific fragrance composers.

      It has been useful to categorize my collection (about 100 frags), into his categories - woody, fresh, floral, oriental & their subcategories. I now experience my fragrances more fully because I see how they related to others in my collection.

      I like looking up the complete ouvre of the composers of fragrances I particularly like.

      It sounds like an outrageous luxury for an individual, but keep in mind its cost relative to professional symposia or university classes, and it may seem like the price is not so out of line. I use to go to workshops for my profession. With travel, lodging and symposia fees, it never cost less than $600 for one workshop.

      I know organizations subscribe to his database and allow their GROUP of employees to refer to it. I think it would be ethical for a group of individuals to subscribe for their group. I donít know what Edwards would think of a group subscribing, but ethically, I think it is an idea that has merit.

    • Strange Accord | 18th April 2006 04:34

      It is awfully expensive. BUT so educational! I decided that I would pay $600 to have the opportunity to take a good class on fragrance. (The public university in my city charges $350 for 3 credits). I don't have the opportunity to take a class on fragrance, per se, so this seemed like a good alternative.

      I subscribed about two months ago and it has been as educational as I would hope $600 or so would be. I know some people flat out cannot afford this. But for others, looking at it from certain perspective, it makes sense as an educational cost.

      I don't know how long I will subscribe, maybe three years. It is a remarkable resource.

      I have appreciated having a "master" guide me when I try a fragrance. It is definately helping me to become sensitized to individual fragrance notes.

      I like being able to look at the ouvre of specific fragrance composers.

      It has been useful to categorize my collection (about 100 frags), into his categories - woody, fresh, floral, oriental & their subcategories. I now experience my fragrances more fully because I see how they related to others in my collection.

      I like looking up the complete ouvre of the composers of fragrances I particularly like.

      It sounds like an outrageous luxury for an individual, but keep in mind its cost relative to professional symposia or university classes, and it may seem like the price is not so out of line. I use to go to workshops for my profession. With travel, lodging and symposia fees, it never cost less than $600 for one workshop.

      I know organizations subscribe to his database and allow their GROUP of employees to refer to it. I think it would be ethical for a group of individuals to subscribe for their group. I donít know what Edwards would think of a group subscribing, but ethically, I think it is an idea that has merit.