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  1. #1

    Default Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    This primer is provided in order to help those desiring to try their hand at the art of perfume-making.

    What is perfume?
    The word perfume is derived from the Latin perfume, meaning "through smoke." The art of perfumery was known to the ancient Chinese, Hindus, Egyptians, Israelites, Carthaginians, Arabs, Greeks, and Romans. References to perfumery materials and even perfume formulas are found in the Bible. The burning of incense in religious rites of ancient China, Palestine, and Egypt led gradually to the personal use of perfume known as attars, widespread in ancient Greece and Rome. During the Middle Ages Crusaders brought knowledge of perfumery to Europe from the East. After 1500 Paris was the major center of perfume-making.

    Perfume consists of fragrance oils diluted in a carrier agent. Pure natural oils are too concentrated for use directly on to the skin.

    -----

    WARNING: Why can I not use undiluted fragrance oils on the skin?
    Natural fragrance oils (absolute and essential) are quite powerful and should NEVER be used in undiluted form on the skin. At a minimum, they can be irritating; at a maximum they can cause serious health hazards.

    For safety, you should:
    - Keep oils out of the reach children.
    - Do not eat or use oils in foods or mix in food containers or with food utensils.
    - Maintain absolute hygiene, cleaning up spillages on you or any surface immediately
    - Remember that Perfumes contain materials that will damage plastic and furniture sufaces and cause irritation

    -----

    What are these "fragrance oils" that I'm supposed to use?
    Perfume uses three types of oils:
    1) Essential Oils - from natural plant materials such as distilled or extracted from flowers, leaves, woods or grasses. (eg. Lavender Oil, Jasmin Absolute)
    2) Aroma chemicals - (chemicals with smells) either seperated from essential oils or from chemical sources such as the crude oil industry (eg. pinene,benzene)
    3) Animal products - from animal secretions (only 4 used : the Civet cat, the Castoreum beaver, the Musk deer and Ambergris from the Sperm Whale)

    You can use both "essential" and "absolute" oils. Essential oils are highly volatile plant essences, produced primarily by steam distillation, or sometimes by cold pressing or by CO2 extraction (although CO2 oils are strictly considered a separate class of oil.) These oils contain the aromatic molecules of the plant. In contrast, the absolute oils are solvent extracted and may have traces of solvents left in them. Both of these oils are 100% natural.

    Generally, absolute oils are more "intense" with the aroma of the plant and are preferable for perfumes. However, both kinds of oils can be used.
    -----

    What should I use as a Carrier agent?
    Carrier agents are usually alcohol, sometimes mixed with distilled water, or a natural fragance-free oil. There are pros and cons to using alcohol as a carrier agent in contrast to a natural oil.

    Most perfumes use alcohol as the carrier agent. Alcohol, by nature of its evaporative properties, will "carry" the fragrance more quickly and powerfully away from the body. Because of its inherent disinfectant properties, it will also preserve much longer on the shelf than perfume that uses a natural oil as the carrier agent.

    On the other hand, a natural-oil carrier will be more sutble and actually has greater staying power on the skin as the fragrance oil is not as quickly being evaporated off the skin. However, perfumes that use natural oil as the carrier will eventually turn rancid. Neverthless, they are a good alternative for people that may be alcohol-sensitive.

    The most common natural oil used as a carrier agent in perfumes is probably Jojoba Oil. Fractionated coconut oil can also be used; both oils known for long life so that rancidity should not be a problem

    Alcohol, if used as the carrier agent, should be as pure as possible. Choices for alcohol in order of preference are:

    1) Perfumers alcohol (very expensive and difficult to come by)
    2) pure grain alcohol (i.e., "Everclear" pure grain alcohol which you can buy in most licquor stores)
    3) Vodka (the highest proof you can find)

    Note: do NOT use rubbing alcohol!

    -----

    Where can I buy my natural fragance oils?
    Almost all commercial perfumes use synthetic fragrance oils because they are much cheaper than natural oils and it is easer to guarantee a consistency of scent. On the other hand, no synthetic oil can match the beauty and aroma of a natural oils. (This helps explain why Creed is so expensive!)

    Unless you're planing to create perfume in mass bulk for worldwide marketing, I suggest you use natural oils. Your perfume will be much higher quality.

    The quality of your perfume is proportional to the quality of the fragrance oils you use. Cheap oil = cheap perfume.

    There are several excellent on-line sources online that ship all over the world. Do an internet search for "perfume absolute oils". Most reputable aromatherapy shops sell good quality fragrance oils

    I would order a couple of test orders from a new source, before buying in bulk, to determine quality. Oils should also be shipped in dark bottles (never transparent) with restrictor caps. Never buy oils from a source that stores (or ships!) oils with rubber dropper caps - the rubber will contaminate the oils.

    In the U.S., Bath & Body works has started selling pure absolute oils this year From what I've seen, the oil quality is good and the prices are reasonable. This is as good a place to start building an oil collection as any.

    -----

    How much do the oils cost?
    Some oils, like lemon and cedarwood are relatively inexpensive. Other oils, like sandalwood and Jasmine can be very expensive. In general, the harder it is to extract the oil, the more expensive it is.

    -----

    Where can I get my carrier agents?
    You can sometimes buy carrier agent oils from the same sources you get your oils from. (Bath & Body Works sells it ready-to-use for perfume.)

    Alcohol is another story. Shipping alcohol is difficult. Your best bet is probably a licquor store for either the 'Everclear" pure grain alcohol or Vodka.

    -----

    What are the different strengths of perfume?
    Fragrances are classified by the percent of pure oils.
    - "Eau de Cologne" is the least concentrated form of a fragrance and generally contains 2 - 5% perfume oils dissolved in water and alcohol.
    - "Eau de Toilette" commonly contains 5 ÷ 10% pure oils.
    - "Eau de Parfum" usually has 10 - 20% pure oils.
    - "Parfum" (the most concentrated, rarest and most expensive) has 20 - 40% pure oils.

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    How do I make solid perfume?
    For a solid perfume, use unscented beeswax to thicken the oil base. Melt together one part beeswax and three to four parts jojoba or fractionated coconut oil until the beeswax is melted. Then let cool slightly until the mixture just starts to thicken, at which point you should blend in your prepared fragrance oil blend. Pour into small containers, and let settle.

    -----

    Why does my perfume only last a short time?
    You need to mix the fragrance oils the way a musical chord is composed, with high,middle and low notes that compliment each other.

    The depth or weight of a specific fragrance oil's aroma is based on the oil's volatility - i.e., how fast it disappears, relative to other oils. A quick way to experience this for yourself is to take some blotting paper (coffee filters, papertowels, absorbent paper, etc.) and drop two or three drops of the fragrance Oil on each blotter. Try a range of oils, one or two citrus oils, a "wood" oil like cedarwood, rosewood, or, best of all, Patchouli or Vetiver; and something in the middle, perhaps lavender or geranium. Wait a few hours and then smell them. The citrus oils will have almost disappeared, while the deeper base notes should be unchanged. Smell it again after 24 hours, 48 hours, etc. This will give you a foundational understanding of the weight of each oil.

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    What is "Relative Impact" or "Relative Strength" of an oil?
    "Relative impact or "relative strength" is the measure of the strength of an oil relative to other oils. In other words, some oils are overpowering to the extent that even a small quantity will overpower larger quantities of other oils. For example, lemon oil has a higher relative impact than Jasmine oil. Mix the same quantity of lemon aand Jasmine and you will smell nothing but lemon.

    Once you start mixing, you will quickly see that some oils have very high relative impact and others have a low relative impact - meaning you will want to use small quantities so as not to comandeer the scent you are trying to develop.

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    What is "odor life"?
    As the name implies, this is length of time the odor of a particular fragrance oil remains after application. You can use paper test strips to test the odor life of each of your oils.

    Amyl Acetate, the fruity pear drops chemical, only lasts a few minutes (0.15Hrs). Sandalwood oil lasts upwards of 6 months (4,500Hrs).

    -----

    How do I create a "mix"?
    Always blend the fragrance oils without diluting to create the mix that pleases you. Dilution comes later. The simplest explanation of the terms "top", "middle" and "base" notes is how tenaciously each aroma lingers. Blending a small amount of a middle note will make a top note last longer. Rounding the blend off with just a single drop or so of a base note anchors it still more. Generally speaking, the lower notes will dominate a blend, if used in equal amounts. Thus, for a rough start, try blending three drops of your chosen top note, two drops of a middle note, and a single drop of a base note.

    Don't forget to write down your mix formulas! Virtually every perfumer has created at least one scent they could not exactly duplicate because they forgot to write the formula down.

    -----


    How long should I let a mix sit?
    At least a few days! The oils will change after mixing.
    While you are almost certinaly not going to be able to wait, you should let a new undiluted mix sit a at least a few days in order to get an idea of what the scent will really be.

    After diluting, you need to let it sit for 4-6 weeks. Otherwise, all you will smell is alcohol if you're using that as the carrier agent

    -----
    How do I know how oils are classified?
    Oils are classified as "base", "middle" and "top" notes in a fragrance. (See the excellent Fragrance Terminolgy thread in this discussion for a definition of each.) While there is general consensus on what classification a specific oil falls under, some oils are classified on multiple levels. Use the oil classification guide at the end of this primer to determine what oils you should be using for each level (i.e., "note") of the fragrance.

    -----

    How many drops per ml?
    This varies by the oil...a thick oil like patchouli or vetiver is going to come up in big thick drops (like molasses, the vetiver) while a citrus oil is going to give you more drops per ml. The "average"...ie industry standard is:

    600 drops 1 oz
    300 drops 1/2 oz 15 ml
    100 drops 5 ml one teaspoon
    20 drops per ml.

    If you are using the same droppers each time you'll get 'consistent' ratios. If you are putting together formulas in mass quantities, once you've fixed your mix (ie 5 parts this oil, 3 parts that one, and 2 of that one, etc.) then you can use a scale that measures in grams and weigh them, instead of counting drops.

    -----

    I'm lost - can you give me some sample formulas?
    Try these formulas:

    Tender Mercies:
    lavender Oil - 2 drops
    carnation Oil - 4 drops
    juniper Oil - 3 drops
    jasmine Oil - 2 drops
    ylang-ylang - 3 drops

    Sultans Pleasure:
    patchouli - 2 drops
    lavender - 2 drops
    ylang-ylang - 3 drops
    jasmine - 1 drop

    Bocquet:
    Bois de Rose - 10 drops
    Palmarosa - 7 drops
    Rose Geranium - 5 drops
    Ylang Ylang - 5 drops
    Patchouli - 1 drop
    Labdanum - 1 drop
    Frankincense - 1 drop

    Warrior:
    Nutmeg - 2 drops
    Litsea Cubeba - 1 drop
    Jasmine - 4 drops
    Clary Sage - 10 drops
    Sandalwood - 4 drops
    Frankincense - 4 drops


    -----

    Oil Classification Guide:
    BASE NOTES:
    Balsam, Bay, Benzoin, Beeswax, Cassia, Cedarwood, Cinnamon, Clove, Frankincense, Geranium, Ginger, Macrorrhizum, Guaiacwood, Heliotrope, Jasmine, Labdanum, Melliot, Moss, Myrrh, Neroli, Oakmoss, Olibanum, Opoponax, Patchouli, Sandalwood, Styrax, Rose, Tonkabean, Valerian, Vanilla, Vanilla Bourbon, Vetiver

    BASE TO MIDDLE NOTES:
    Bay, Cedarwood, Cinnamon, Frankincense, Myrrh, Orange Blossom, Patchouli, Pimento berry, Sandalwood, Styrax, Vetiver, Ylang Ylang

    MIDDLE NOTES:
    Angelica, Anise, Artemisia, Balm, Basil, Bay, Caraway, Cardamom, Carnation, Cassia, Cassie, Carrot, Chamomile, Clary-sage, Clove, Coriander, Cumin, Cypress, Fennel, Galbanum, Geranium, Ginger, Ho Leaf, Ho Wood, Hyacinth, Hyssop, Jasmine, Jonquil, Juniper, Lavender, Lemongrass, Linden, Lotus (Blue), Mandarin, Marjoram, Mimosa, Myrtle, Narcissus, Neroli, Nutmeg, Orchid, Oregano, Oriental rose, Orris root, Osmanthus, Palma Roas, Pepper (black), Peppermint, Pettigraine, Pahna rosa, Pimento berry, Pine, Pine needle, Rose, Rosa Alba, Rosa cendfolia, Rosemary, Rosewood, Sage, Spikenard, Tarragon, Tobacco leaf, Thyme, Toberose, Violet flower, Yarrow, Ylang-ylang.

    MIDDLE TO TOP NOTES:
    Angelica, Basil, Bay, Bergamot, Caraway, Cassis, Clary-sage, Coriander, Fennel, Hyacinth, Hyssop, Lavender, Lemongrass, Linden Blossom , Marjoram, Melissa, Mimosa, Neroli, Nutmeg, Oregano, Orange Blossom, Palmarosa, Pepper (black), Pimento berry, Rosemary, Rosewood, Tarragon, Tea Tree, Thyme.

    TOP NOTES:
    Angelica, Anise, Armoise, Artemisia, Basil, Bergamot, Cajuput, Cardamom, Cedar leaf, Chamomile, Cinnamon, Coriander, Cumin, Davana, Estragon, Eucalyptus, Galbanum, Grapefruit, Juniper, Lavender, Lemon, Lemon Orange, Lime, Linden Blossom, Lotus (Blue), Mandarin, Marigold, Niaouli, Neroli, Orange, Orange Blossom, Peppermint, Pettigraine, Ravensara, Rose Otto, Sage, Spearmint, Tagetes, Tangerine, Verbena, Violet Odorata
    Last edited by Grant; 23rd September 2012 at 12:30 PM. Reason: fixed formatting

  2. #2

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (in progress)

    Feel free to give me your comments on the layout. 8)

  3. #3

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume; comments on lay

    That is fascinating stuff, ItalianStallion! Makes me want to experiment at home! Good goin'! 8)

  4. #4

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume; comments on lay

    This is excellent stuff - I recommend you have some fun with the layout - click on the yellow HELP up in the toolbar and then click on Posting on the left side of that page to learn how to add color, etc...this is how I created the Fragrance Terminology thread...

    I recommend highlighting the questions in one color and making them bold, and the answers in another color...Also, terms like Carrier Agent may be foreign to some users so maybe you can say "What ingredients should I use?"

    also...you stated that both oil and alcohol as carriers are longer-lasting - do you mean one has a longer shelf-life and one lasts longer on the skin?

    Thx so much for this great work! I think this will be a great permanent addition to our board! Keep up the good work!

    marlen
    japan/usa

  5. #5

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume; comments on lay

    Thanks - excellent feedback. I will incorporate your comments.

    Quote Originally Posted by scenteur7
    This is excellent stuff - I recommend you have some fun with the layout - click on the yellow HELP up in the toolbar and then click on Posting on the left side of that page to learn how to add color, etc...this is how I created the Fragrance Terminology thread...

    I recommend highlighting the questions in one color and making them bold, and the answers in another color...Also, terms like Carrier Agent may be foreign to some users so maybe you can say "What ingredients should I use?"

    also...you stated that both oil and alcohol as carriers are longer-lasting - do you mean one has a longer shelf-life and one lasts longer on the skin?

    Thx so much for this great work! I think this will be a great permanent addition to our board! Keep up the good work!

    marlen
    japan/usa

  6. #6

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Version 1 of the primer is done. Comments and feedback are welcome.

    Enjoy! ;D

  7. #7

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Great stuff!

    Do you keep a log of what a scent smells like or a chart of how many drops you used in each scent?

    Can you add materials other than oils to create a scent? I read someplace that you could create a cologne using oils and the peels of fruits or broken up spices to an alcohol base, let it sit for a couple weeks and then strain what is left through a coffee filter.

    Also any recommendations on where to get good glass sprayers? I've only been able to find cheap plastic ones which probably affect the scent.

    I really like the idea of creating a solid perfume; that sounds very convenient... where could I get the beeswax, and will the beeswax affect the scent? I think you listed beeswax as a basenote.

    Another question : what is the expected life of an oil once you purchase it, and what is the expected life of a scent once you create it?

    I'm full of questions today. Great primer!
    In rotation: Greenbriar (new), Silver Mountain Water, Dunhill for Men (1934), Acqua di Parma Colonia, Habit Rouge EDC, Ho Hang, B*Men, Agua Brava

  8. #8

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Do you keep a log of what a scent smells like or a chart of how many drops you used in each scent?
    Absolutely.

    Can you add materials other than oils to create a scent? I read someplace that you could create a cologne using oils and the peels of fruits or broken up spices to an alcohol base, let it sit for a couple weeks and then strain what is left through a coffee filter.
    Oils are more powerful and are used in the best perfumes. ╩And not all plants produce oils. ╩i.e., there is no such thing a Gardenia absolute or essential oil. ╩Any freagrance tha has Gardenia is using a synthetic. ╩While experimenting with other things may be occasionally fun, I'd stick with the oils.

    [i[Also any recommendations on where to get good glass sprayers? I've only been able to find cheap plastic ones which probably affect the scent.[/i]
    I too had a hard time finding quality sprayers. ╩However, for the classic perfume bottle,it's hard to beat a Roger Gandelman original handblown bottle. ╩i.e., check these out:http://www.njmgallery.com/pages/gandelman.html

    I really like the idea of creating a solid perfume; that sounds very convenient... where could I get the beeswax, and will the beeswax affect the scent? ╩I think you listed beeswax as a basenote.
    Many of the online sources for oils will also offer beeswax.

    [i]Another question : what is the expected life of an oil once you purchase it, and what is the expected life of a scent once you create it?[/]
    Same as perfume. ╩At least 18 months and them will begin to degrade. ╩Which brings up a good point - store your oils in cool, dark place as you would good perfume.

    Quote Originally Posted by MisterK
    Great stuff!

    Do you keep a log of what a scent smells like or a chart of how many drops you used in each scent?

    Can you add materials other than oils to create a scent? I read someplace that you could create a cologne using oils and the peels of fruits or broken up spices to an alcohol base, let it sit for a couple weeks and then strain what is left through a coffee filter.

    Also any recommendations on where to get good glass sprayers? I've only been able to find cheap plastic ones which probably affect the scent.

    I really like the idea of creating a solid perfume; that sounds very convenient... where could I get the beeswax, and will the beeswax affect the scent? ╩I think you listed beeswax as a basenote.

    Another question : what is the expected life of an oil once you purchase it, and what is the expected life of a scent once you create it?

    I'm full of questions today. Great primer!

  9. #9

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Quote Originally Posted by ItalianStallion
    [i]I too had a hard time finding quality sprayers. ╩However, for the classic perfume bottle,it's hard to beat a Roger Gandelman original handblown bottle. ╩i.e., check these out:http://www.njmgallery.com/pages/gandelman.html

    wow, what beautiful bottles. ╩There is a link on the page to still more fab bottles by other artists. ╩If you can't afford these beauties, though, here is another link that seems to have quite an assorment of sprayers.

    https://www.alicealiya.com/atomizersking/index.html

    If you are looking ofr even less expensive, say, to decant a drop or two for a Buddy. . .er, friend ╩;D ╩, this is a good spot:

    https://bestbottles.com/home.html

    This site also has accessories. . .funnels, droppers, ect. . . they seem to very inexpensive, for the most part, with a large selection

    And still more, with bulk quantities for those of you who are successful at this. . .

    http://store.yahoo.com/casadeperfumes/noname.html

  10. #10

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Brilliant piece-thanks for the time and effort you put in!!!!It seems a relatively simple process to make your own scent but as we all appreciate bloody difficult to make a passable attempt not withstanding a masterpiece!!Thanks again

  11. #11

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Very Nice work Stallion,
    Iźve saved the info for future experiments.

    Regards
    Matt

  12. #12

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    I made Warrior. Niiice. Had doubts about all that Clary, but it worked fine. Did you formulate it?
    Will try the others in your primer. If you've got more good recipes please post them.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    I still have extra bottles of diluent for sale or swap if anyone is interested.

    http://www.basenotes.net/cgi-bin/for...num=1089179261

  14. #14

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    ive read that most perfumers first combine the elements of the base, middle and top notes seperatley, then wait before putting them together for the final mixture

    does anyone know if this is indeed fact and what purpose it serves if it is ?

  15. #15

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Quote Originally Posted by czesc
    ive read that most perfumers first combine the elements of the base, middle and top notes seperatley, then wait before putting them together for the final mixture

    does anyone know if this is indeed fact and what purpose it serves if it is ?
    I'm sure a lot of people have different reasons. I think one is that so you can adjust each portion of the blend.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Wow ItalianStallion! Thanks for the primer. I'm printing it out right now. One thing though. You're using the term "fragrance oils" but to me "fragrance oil" means a synthetic oil and "essential oil" means...uh...the natural or somewhat natural product from the plant.

    But I've been wrong before.

    Thanks again for the wonderful primer!

  17. #17

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Wow! Excellent post, I must get myself some oils.... I have all the other equipment necesary for mixing. Congrats! ;D

  18. #18

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Thanks for that , it sounds like a great hobby and interesting thing to do
    I looked on ebay for the oils etc and i bought this.

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...e=STRK:MEWN:IT

    I was wondering if anyone could help me on what to do with this , i am still a bit confused with the main post , but i should get my head around it.!? :-[

  19. #19

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Quote Originally Posted by abro100
    Thanks for that , it sounds like a great hobby and interesting thing to do ╩
    I looked on ebay for the oils etc and i bought this.

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...e=STRK:MEWN:IT

    I was wondering if anyone could help me on what to do with this , i am still a bit confused with the main post , but i should get my head around it.!? :-[
    These are knock-off oils. I have used some from different companies. They can often approximate the real thing, but usually a couple notes are missing. Now and then they get it dead-on.

    I believe what you have purchased are essential oils blended to approximate a scent, and mixed with Jojoba oil for application to your skin. You should be able to apply the oil you purchased directly to your skin, or you can dilute it in grain alcohol if you want to spray it on your skin. Sometimes you get blobs of oil if you dilute it incorrectly, however, so I would recommend just applying it to your skin.

    If you want to create your own fragrance, you might start off with a few essential oils or fragrance oils, but make sure they are not cut with jojoba or other oils. If anyone is going to cut the fragrance with jojoba or grain alcohol (or any other diluent), it should be you.
    K

    In rotation: Greenbriar (new), Silver Mountain Water, Dunhill for Men (1934), Acqua di Parma Colonia, Habit Rouge EDC, Ho Hang, B*Men, Agua Brava

  20. #20

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    thanks alot k . yeah i think thety are what you are saying , i emailed the person about it and they said it comes with a roller abll.
    I have read the feedback though and near enough everyone says it smells the exact same , the mostpopular feedback was the armani which i chose , if it is good ill probably try a few more , the L'Issey Miyake (SP :P) one is also rated as excellent they have aload of scents though.

    Oh yeash , would this be ok after shaving or should i apply moisuriser , which i need to buy an unscented one.

  21. #21

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Quote Originally Posted by abro100
    thanks alot k . yeah i think thety are what you are saying , i emailed the person about it and they said it comes with a roller abll.
    I have read the feedback though and near enough everyone says it smells the exact same , the mostpopular feedback was the armani which i chose , if it is good ill probably try a few more , the L'Issey Miyake (SP :P) one is also rated as excellent they have aload of scents though.

    Oh yeash , would this be ok after shaving or should i apply moisuriser , which i need to buy an unscented one.
    Roller ball should be OK. Not as easy to use as a spray, IMHO, but pretty good for a few quid. I got started on the fragrance obsession with the oils and moved on to the real thing after a while.

    I would definitely not use the oils as aftershaves! I think they would seriously burn your skin. You haven't experienced pain until you apply something which has some spice in it. I made the mistake of spraying some Habit Rouge oil I mixed with alcohol close to my neck, where I shaved. The pain was rather unpleasant.

    I'd recommend buying an unscented aftershave and or purchasing some witch hazel and using it. I have made my own aftershave with witch hazel using Mint Extract (the kind you buy for cooking) and adding that to witch hazel. You don't need to add much mint extract to the witch hazel to notice the mint.

    Witch Hazel is an astringent and contracts the capillaries which helps restrict bleeding and tighens up the face. A number of commercial aftershaves (i.e. Anthony Logistics) use Witch Hazel as a prime ingredient in aftershave.
    In rotation: Greenbriar (new), Silver Mountain Water, Dunhill for Men (1934), Acqua di Parma Colonia, Habit Rouge EDC, Ho Hang, B*Men, Agua Brava

  22. #22

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    i got it today.

    It is actually very good , at first it smells a bit diffrent but after say 5 minuits it smells exactly like armani he .
    I have had it on for about 4 hours now and the smell is still pretty strong so people can smell it.

    i think i might just buy some unscented lotion and apply that and then use this at first.

    Thanks very much for the advice though , i have copied them to notebook for future refrence , so when i do start to get a better sense of what smells i like etc i will be able to do it ;D

  23. #23

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    I found this link by random web surfing

    http://www.perfumersworld.com/index.html


    this sounds very interesting!
    anyone here want to be a professional perfumer?
    Oriscent, AgarAura Pure Ouds, Creed, LIDGE, Patou Pour Homme, tons of niche and rare stuff for sale!
    http://www.basenotes.net/threads/253...er-100-items!!

  24. #24
    Yvan
    Guest

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    So, has anyone been trying to make any fragrance here? How have your experiments gone?

    I'd like to try making a cologne using a pure grain alcohol like Everclear, but I hear that even if you let it sit for 4 to 6 weeks, it'll still end up smelling kind of like alcohol. Has anyone found that to be true?

  25. #25
    Yvan
    Guest

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    After formulating some mixes of essential oils and letting them blend and settle for 2 days, I've added Everclear to the bottles and will now wait 4 to 6 weeks 'till they mature. ╩I thought I'd add a few of my notes.

    MIXING
    Since the average given earlier in the thread is 600 drops for one ounce, if you're making one ounce of an eau de toilette (10% oil, though EDT strength can vary depending on who you talk to), that means 60 drops of essential oils and the other 90% (540 drops) is your alcohol solution. ╩Since it's my first time and I want to save my oils for larger batches once I know my test mixes are okay, I went with 1/2 ounce to start. ╩That means 30 drops of essential oils and 270 drops of alcohol.

    I didn't want to have to tediously measure out the 270 drops with an eye-dropper, so what I did was use a ruler and make a mark at the halfway point of each 1-ounce bottle...since the essential oil mixture was already in the bottle, all I had to do was fill Everclear up to the line at the halfway mark. ╩Maybe it's a few drops of alcohol more or less, but I'm less concerned with that than the essential oil ratios. ╩I added some alcohol, swirled the bottle to combine it, and kept adding it until it reached the mark.

    SIZE OF DROPS
    That was a good point about how drops can be different sizes depending on the thickness of the oil...I found benzoin was on the thick side, so instead of the 4 drops of benzoin I had planned to add, I added 3 drops.

    TOOLS
    One good tip I can give is, when pinching and depressing the rubber top of the glass eye-dropper when you're drawing up oil or alcohol into it and then transfering it into the bottle, take your time...I found if you depress the rubber top too quickly, the oil or alcohol can quickly suck up inside the eye-dropper, it could go all the way up to the rubber top and dribble down to the tip...you don't want a rubber note in your scent, so avoid that possible contamination by going slowly. ╩

    Also, I found all the tools I needed for my humble beginner's kit were the bottles to mix the essential oils (and later the alcohol) in, glass eye-droppers to transfer the oil and alcohol, a glass bowl with alcohol to cleanse the eye-dropper in between each oil transfer, a shot glass with alcohol to hold the eye-dropper uncontaminated so you can occasionally free up your hands...and later, when you add the alcohol to the oils, you can pour the alcohol from its bottle into the glass bowl and use the eye-dropper to transfer it from there into the bottles containing the oils. ╩So, I found I didn't need a glass stirrer...just swirling the bottles in a circular motion combined the oils perfectly. ╩Mind you, if all you're mixing are thick essential oils, you may need a stirrer, but usually, over half the essential oils you add will be of thin consistency, so it will be easy to mix them by swirling the bottle. ╩You might look and see if in fact it's all smooth liquid in there or if there are clumps on the bottom. ╩

    After combining the oils and alcohol, while you're waiting for it to mature, visit your mixture periodically and swirl the bottle several times. ╩Depending on what oils you combined, you might find some milky oil residue that has settled in the bottom of the bottle. ╩Swirl it to mix it all together.

    Before mixing the oils or mixing alcohol into the oils, make sure all your tools are clean, so nothing contaminates the mixture. ╩Wash them well with soap...let them air dry rather than drying with a towel...or after rinsing with hot water, shake excess water out really well and rinse again with alcohol to purify. ╩Some people suggest boiling the bottles etc. in hot water, but my bottles had labels with glue on the outside, and I figured if I boiled them, bits of the label and glue could end up in the bottle, and I didn't want that, so I just hand-washed them.

    CARRIER SOLUTION
    Some web pages say the alcohol solution you add to the essential oils should be 90% alcohol and 10% distilled water. ╩The distilled water apparently helps to soften a fragrance and slow its evaporation rate. ╩One web page says to first blend some glycerin with the water to prevent bubbles. ╩I just added straight Everclear...I'll tell you how it turns out! ╩Vodka already contains some water, so if you use that, you wouldn't have to add water. ╩If you do add a bit of water, it should be distilled, because you don't want organic matter in, let's say, tap water, mucking up the scent.

    And if for any reason you notice globules of undissolved oil floating around in the mixture, once it's reached maturity after 4 to 6 weeks, you could use a coffee filter (in a glass funnel) to strain the liquid. ╩Then again, it probably won't hurt anything to leave it in there.

    I have to add...I encourage anyone who has the urge to make their own frags to try it at least once. ╩I've found it really satisfying to get all the elements together and try my hand at the magic of fragrance alchemy.

  26. #26

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    I just added straight Everclear...I'll tell you how it turns out!
    One thing to note is that the strength of Everclear varies according to where you buy it. In California the strongest you can get is 151 proof (75% alcohol), in other states (Nevada, I think) you can get stronger stuff, perhaps as high as 180-190 proof (90-95% alcohol).
    All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

  27. #27

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Some very good information posted here!
    I would like to add that when using an alcohol base for fragrance, a fixative should be added so the scent will last longer on the skin. Glycerine is a good one...use at 2-3%
    Good luck!
    Last edited by Cat; 31st July 2008 at 03:37 AM. Reason: edit

  28. #28
    Yvan
    Guest

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Hi Cat...it's nice to see your "recipes." I plan to post mine, whether they turn out good or bad, as soon as the batches are finished maturing...2 weeks to go.

    As far as using a fixative goes, I used essential oils that are fixatives, like benzoin and vanilla. Not sure if that would eliminate the need for glycerin or not. Maybe fixatives for the oils are different from fixatives between the oils and the alcohol, though I know the fixative oils do help prolong the scent and some help "bind" the different oils together. Good to have your formula on hand in case I find I need to adjust things.

  29. #29

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Glad to help, Yvan!
    The purpose of a fixative is to slow down the evaporation rate of the other oils and in this case, the base as well.
    Essential oils that are good fixatives are the slower-evaporating ones like sandalwood, benzoin, vetiver, frankincense, balsam peru, labdanum, oakmoss, etc. They also add depth and richness to the blend.
    Unfortunately, many of these oils are strongly-scented, and can "take over" a blend unless used with care.
    A good rule of the thumb when using these is to limit them to no more than 10 to 15 percent of a perfume formula, especially if the top and middle notes are comprised of more delicate, ethereal scents.
    The addition of glycerine, which is an odorless, syrupy by-product of soapmaking, adds a humectant quality to the blend, helping to offset the drying effects of the alcohol and helps the scent last longer once it's applied.
    Hope this helps...I would be interested in seeing your recipes when they are ready!
    Cat

  30. #30

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Thank you ItalianStallion for great article; Yvan, Cat and K for really helpful advice.

    ItalianStallion mentioned quality of ingredients. Problem: Tincture of Ambergris is 75.00 Euros for 16 ml. Do I want to substitute ambreina?

    Problem: I want to make Old Spice and Old Spice Lime(the Shulton version - not the current Proctor and Gamble product). Basenotes lists the ingredients to the Old Spice formula, all 18 of them. But what are the proportions? I have unopened vintage OS and OS Lime cologne - but I am not a perfumer. Or a chemist. Or a cook. Too expensive to have analyzed and copied.

    Looking forward to reading yvan recipes.

  31. #31
    Yvan
    Guest

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Hi bottoni...welcome to the forum! It sounds like real ambergris is one of the expensive tinctures! I haven't seen any ambergris that's less expensive on the net...mind you, I haven't looked too hard...luckily, as a base note, you'd only need a few drops, I guess. Unless you want the real stuff, you might be able to get away with an ambergris "fragrance oil," which I assume is like a "faux" ambergris, but a whole lot less expensive. Here's one link that carries it--they're probably lots more--and it's under their perfume oils.

    http://www.leavesandroots.com/Oil/oil.html

    Not sure how fragrance oils mix with alcohol, but I'm guessing they'd mix just as well as essential oils.

    As to the proportions of notes, I believe it's a secret that frag companies guard closely.

  32. #32

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Yvan - Leaves and Roots has nice prices. I like the chart which translated ounces, drams, drops and ml.

    I found ambergris at www.profumo.it. (And it seems to have come down in price - to 65.00 Euros.) The AMBERGRIS FRAGRANCE OIL on the Leaves and Roots website is a synthetic - a chemical replacement for ambergris which probably is ambreina.

    My question is: does it justify the effort to make cologne if we use synthetics? The Basenotes Old Spice pyramid lists ambergris. My argument for making the Shulton formula is that Proctor and Gamble doctored Old Spice into something unpleasant, probably by substituting
    'natural ingredients' for 'chemicals'.

    I am going to rewrite my shopping list, determine quantities and prices, and probably order the Leaves and Roots version of ambergris (ambreina) because I am an amateur and can't justify that expensive of an experiment.

    Yvan, if you have a spare moment, check www.perfumersworld.com.

    Also found: formulator's alcohol on www.snowdriftfarm.com. It is expensive as ItalianStallion mentioned.

  33. #33

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    That supplier of alcohol is an excellent find!
    All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

  34. #34

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Hi Bottoni:
    I'm sure the manufacturer of Old Spice uses only synthetic ambergris, since the import of any whale product as well as Musk is prohibited (at least here in the 'States).
    Because of this as well as the animal rights movement and cost factors, many perfume manufacturers have switched to synthetic alternatives.
    But to answer your original question, commercial perfumes are considered "proprietary", meaning they are not required to disclose their ingredients unlike cosmetic and skin care products.
    The list of ingredients for Old Spice is probably only the main notes in the blend; it could literally contain hundreds of minute ingredients, each one contributing to the final product.
    Unfortunately, without a chemical analysis or the actual formula we must go with what we have, so there are no guarantees that our rendition will smell like the original!

    From Basenote's Directory:

    Old Spice
    Top Notes: Orange, Lemon, Spices, Clary Sage, Aldehydes
    Middle Notes: Cinnamon, Carnation, Geranium, Jasmine, Heliotrope, Pimento Berry
    Base Notes: Vanilla, Musk, Cedarwood, Frankincense, Benzoin, Tonka, Ambergris

    The Top Note of a fragrance is the largest portion of the blend, comprising up to 50% of the scent. It is usually made up of volatile oils that evaporate quickly, revealing the Middle Note which is the main scent, making up around 30% of the blend.
    Finally, the Base Note comprises the slowest-evaporating scents that anchor the Top and Middle notes as well as adding depth and richness to the final scent. It is the smallest portion of the scent, only comprising 15-20 percent, since the scents are generally heavier and more likely to overpower the lighter scents in the Top and Middle notes.

    Cat
    Last edited by Cat; 31st July 2008 at 03:31 AM. Reason: edited

  35. #35

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    since the import of any whale product ... is prohibited (at least here in the 'States).
    You think that there is some prohibition against the import of whale vomit? Where did you get this information? I think that this belief that ambergris is a prohibited substance is a, not uncommon, misperception.

    http://www.profumo.it/perfume/aromat...mbergris_1.htm
    All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

  36. #36

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    The link you provided is an interesting one, but I did notice it's an Italian website, which probably has different regs. than the U.S. regarding contraband materials.
    I did manage to find this:

    From http://www.csc.noaa.gov/opis/html/summary/wca.htm:

    Whaling Convention Act of 1949 (16 U.S.C. 916-9161)
    "Under this Act, it is illegal for any person under U.S. jurisdiction to engage in any act prohibited or not do any act required by the Convention, this Act, or any regulations promulgated by the Secretary of Commerce pursuant to this Act. It is also illegal to ship, transport, purchase, sell, offer for sale, import, export, or have in possession any whale or whale products taken in violation of the Convention, this Act, or any regulation promulgated by the Secretary of Commerce pursuant to this Act. The prohibitions of this Act do not preclude the taking of whales for scientific investigation, with the approval of the Secretary."

    Unfortunately, certifying whether ambergris is humanely harvested from the sea or the by-product of slaughter is difficult, especially since the end product has changed many hands in the process.

    I have found that what some unethical manufacturers are claiming to be humanely-harvested ambergris is nothing more that lumps of resins and essential oils that are sold in import shops as "amber" (I'll post more about this later).

    True ambergris is foul-smelling (I have been fortunate(?) to smell some at a museum). The sample was well over 50 years old, and still reeked! :P
    Old formularies claim that upon dilution, it becomes a valuable fixative for delicate perfumes (in extremely high dilution, I might add)!

    "Amber" (and yes, the term has been used in the past as an abbreviation for ambergris as well as for substances that resemble the scent) resin is usually a combination of benzoin and labdanum resins with essential oils like sandalwood, balsam peru, clary sage, etc. added, depending on the manufacturer. The presence of benzoin reveals itself in the small, needle-like crystals of benzoic acid sometimes found on the surface, giving it a "furry" appearance.
    The scent, if you are not familiar with it, is warm and vanilla-like, very unlike ambergris, which has a smoky, fetid smell.


  37. #37

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Thank you, Cat, for the blending formula. Just finished ordering everything. (I notice you didn't include aldehyde.)

    Plan on preparing three test batches: Cat's formula, Lime & Bergamot Cat and Vetiver & Others Cat.

    Question: Purchased 'jasmine absolute 10% in jojoba' and 'vanilla 10% in jojoba'. Same proportion - 1 drop?

    Question: Of what would an oriental formula be comprised?

    Note: If purchasing Everclear, you may want to shop in a neighborhood other than your own. Evidently it has quite a following among the chronically drunk/homeless set. Avoid the stigma.

    Recent find: www.birchhillhappenings.com. Good selection of essential oils, sells in small amounts (15-20 drop vial for $1 - 2, perfect size for trial run). Shipping and handling $5.00.

    If my calculations are correct, I should more than enough Everclear left to party with my 'new friends'.

  38. #38

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Correction: Three test batches are to be labeled:

    Old Cat

    Old Cat Fresh Lime

    Old Cat High Endurance

  39. #39

    Default grain alcohol product - Perfumer's Blend

    There is a website called www.chemistrystore.com. They sell a product called Perfumer's Blend. It is 10% Distilled Water and 90% SDA. When I've used this as a carrier, the overall quality of my finished product was higher than the eau de toilette products sold at major department stores and at least at the same level or slightly higher than their eau de parfum products.


    Quote Originally Posted by Yvan
    So, has anyone been trying to make any fragrance here? ╩How have your experiments gone? ╩

    I'd like to try making a cologne using a pure grain alcohol like Everclear, but I hear that even if you let it sit for 4 to 6 weeks, it'll still end up smelling kind of like alcohol. ╩Has anyone found that to be true?

  40. #40

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    The Perfumers World website ( http://www.perfumersworld.com ) has some great software called The Perfumer's Workbook you can download for free.
    It has a raw material database, a section where you can compose and record your own compositions, a pie chart type prediction of the odour of a compounds at different stages of evaporation etc etc

    I have found it useful to keep track of my concoctions.


  41. #41

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    When I mix my oils with the alcohol, they always separateand the mixtures remain cloudy not clear. How do I get it to look and act like a marketable fragrance?

  42. #42

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    What type of alcohol? If perfumer's alcohol, switch to formulator's alcohol. www.snowdriftfarm.com

    If using vodka, Everclear... it may need to 'rest' for a longer period or it may never 'uncloud'.

  43. #43

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    I'M HAVING THE SAME PROBLEM(
    Oil mixed with everclear FANTASTICALLY, But when added the glycerine/distilled water mixture- IT TURNED CLOUDY - and the oil seperated.

    PLEASE HELP US FIGURE OUT WHATS WRONG (

  44. #44

    Default Re: grain alcohol product - Perfumer's Blend

    Quote Originally Posted by whatareyouwearing
    There is a website called www.chemistrystore.com. *They sell a product called Perfumer's Blend. *It is 10% Distilled Water and 90% SDA. *When I've used this as a carrier, the overall quality of my finished product was higher than the eau de toilette *products sold at major department stores and at least at the same level or slightly higher than their eau de parfum products.<br><br><br>[quote author=Yvan link=board=creation;num=1091657249;start=15#23 date=1105229732]So, has anyone been trying to make any fragrance here? ╩How have your experiments gone? ╩<br><br>I'd like to try making a cologne using a pure grain alcohol like Everclear, but I hear that even if you let it sit for 4 to 6 weeks, it'll still end up smelling kind of like alcohol. ╩Has anyone found that to be true?
    <br>[/quote]

    I'm sorry...what is SDA??

  45. #45

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Smata:

    The good news is that you used Everclear which mixes with oils and water - *like FORMULATOR'S ALCOHOL.

    SDA is an alcohol which is evidently diluted with 10% distilled water. Let's avoid this product.

    Did you let your mixture stand?

    Too much water in proportion to alcohol? Why add water? Add small amount of alcohol. Make certain to measure the amount of alcohol before adding to mixture...

    Glycerin? Why add glycerin? It may have clouded your mixture. (You are making a 'pourable' perfume, right?)

    Snowdrift Farms explains the difference between PERFUMER'S ALCOHOL and FORMULATOR'S ALCOHOL:

    * *http://www.snowdriftfarm.com/form_perfumes.html

    My early attempts with Everclear yielded crystal-clear results; however, I did not add water or glycerin...

    Note: Write everything down in a notebook. I use one page per experiment. Dates, measurements, EOs, etc. If something goes terribly right you want to be able to duplicate your efforts! Multiple experiments? Label your containers, too.

    Note: Make your trial batches relatively small as EOs, etc are expensive. You can always 'scale-up' your measurements to make large batches once you've perfected your experiments. *

    Sounds like you are enjoying your project. Please post your results to share with us.

    Antonio.

    P.S. Welcome to Basenotes.

  46. #46

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    SDA is an alcohol which is evidently diluted with 10% distilled water. Let's avoid this product.
    "SDA" stands for "Specially Denatured Alcohol", it has nothing to do with water content. Denatured means that stuff has been added to the alcohol to make it unfit for drinking, the Specially means that the denaturant(s) were carefully chosen so that the alcohol would still be fit for other uses such as perfumery. A blend of 90% SDA with 10% water will be excellent for making perfumes and colognes; there is no reason to avoid this product.

    Oil mixed with everclear FANTASTICALLY, But when added the glycerine/distilled water mixture- IT TURNED CLOUDY - and the oil seperated
    This is what one should expect. Essential oils are soluble in alcohol, they are not soluble in water. As you continue to add water to your alcohol you will eventually reach a point where the alcohol/water mixture will no longer dissolve the essential oils and they will seperate out.

    Glycerin? Why add glycerin? It may have clouded your mixture.
    It was the water not glycerin that caused the cloudiness. Glycerin will function as a fixative.
    All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

  47. #47

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Wow Y'all are GREAT ;D. It's fantastic to finally find like minds

    Thanks for ALL the advice.. Maybe I didn't explain my situation well enough.

    My CONCENTRATED perfume Oils & Everclear worked like a DREAM .

    But, I found a recipe online for a body SPLASH, I was trying to "dilute" concentrated perfume into an after bath Body Splash. Maybe this is where my problem lies. The recipe called for dilution of glycerine in water added to concentrate.

    Maybe you can tell me what I'm doing wrong in this area. Thanks a MIL!!

    Walk in beauty....Shelly

  48. #48
    dirk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    amsterdam and duesseldorf
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (in progress)

    Quote Originally Posted by ItalianStallion
    Feel free to give me your comments on the layout. 8)
    hi, stallion! let me make one remark to your primer on mesuring: when counting drops you MUST dilute your materials beforehand, also assuming that you will use liquids as well as solid, cristaline, etc. materials! preferably at a 10% strength, otherwise you could never repeat your experiments precisely! this dillution should then be made by weighting the fragrance material as well as your dilluent.
    si doux, tout musc...

  49. #49

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Mister K,

    When I first started out, I kept a diary of each of the scents I created. In the diary I would include the following:

    The ingredients; amounts by drop, ml, etc. But I also noted the source of each ingredient. Someone wise told me early on that essential oils are like wine---each with a brand and a pedigree. "Lemon" essential oil may generally smell the same from maker to maker, but the subtle differences could mean a huge difference after oils are blended.

    Also, I kept track of the changes in the fragrance over time. This helped me develop my NOSE. I came to understand how Maker A's Patchouli reacted with Maker B's Amber and with Maker C"s chemical aroma, for example. It's Fun! The wonderful news is that if you follow basic rules about blending Base, Heart & Top notes, and learn what blends well together, your newly created fragrance only improves with age.

    Caroline

  50. #50

    Talking Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    OMG, I'm new to Basenotes, and I have to say...I'm LOVING this thread. You definitely make me want to start creating scents NOW. Fantastic information here. Thank you so much.

  51. #51

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    This is incredibe. Thank you very much.

  52. #52

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Quote Originally Posted by smata View Post
    Wow Y'all are GREAT ;D. It's fantastic to finally find like minds

    Thanks for ALL the advice.. Maybe I didn't explain my situation well enough.

    My CONCENTRATED perfume Oils & Everclear worked like a DREAM .

    But, I found a recipe online for a body SPLASH, I was trying to "dilute" concentrated perfume into an after bath Body Splash. Maybe this is where my problem lies. The recipe called for dilution of glycerine in water added to concentrate.

    Maybe you can tell me what I'm doing wrong in this area. Thanks a MIL!!

    Walk in beauty....Shelly

    Please if you are selling your products know that you can't sell them for use on the body unless you use SDA you cannot sell products for use on the body with grain alcohol, vodka etc. You must use SDA or a Perfumers blend. I just don't want anyone getting in trouble.

  53. #53

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Would using a metal bottle be wrong. I'm making a somewhat "futuristic" scent and I think it might go well for testing on my friends.

  54. #54

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    you cannot sell products for use on the body with grain alcohol, vodka etc. You must use SDA or a Perfumers blend.
    That is not true. There is no problem with using grain alcohol. I take it you have been reading the disinformation on a certain vendor's website.
    All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

  55. #55

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    The only way you can use grain alcohol to mix and sell as perfume is if you check IDs and have an ABC license Gotta use denat otherwise

    Quote Originally Posted by dcampen View Post
    That is not true. There is no problem with using grain alcohol. I take it you have been reading the disinformation on a certain vendor's website.
    I'm a colognosaurus. Rawr!

  56. #56

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    here is a cool tool. it measures in increments of .01ml
    Attached Images Attached Images

  57. #57

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    this has helped me learn so much - the only thing im unsure is how much carrier to add to the formulas and whether there is an alternative carrier to alcohol ?

    Thanks for your help :-)
    when your walking through hell walk faster !
    old enough to be mature - young enough to act plain stupid

  58. #58

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Quote Originally Posted by jrd4t View Post
    The only way you can use grain alcohol to mix and sell as perfume is if you check IDs and have an ABC license Gotta use denat otherwise
    This is just not true!
    All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

  59. #59

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Quote Originally Posted by veggie4life View Post
    this has helped me learn so much - the only thing im unsure is how much carrier to add to the formulas and whether there is an alternative carrier to alcohol ?

    Thanks for your help :-)
    The amount of carrier depends on how strong you want the scent to be. Refer to the intial post on dilution levels.

    A good substitute for alcohol is MCT Fractionated Coconut oil. It's light, non-greasy, has no scent, good shelf life and inexpensive. If you look at Etsy Buy, a lot of the home-made non-alcoholic perfumes use fractionated coconut oil.

  60. #60

    Default Re: Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)

    Quote Originally Posted by bottledupemotions View Post
    The amount of carrier depends on how strong you want the scent to be. Refer to the intial post on dilution levels.

    A good substitute for alcohol is MCT Fractionated Coconut oil. It's light, non-greasy, has no scent, good shelf life and inexpensive. If you look at Etsy Buy, a lot of the home-made non-alcoholic perfumes use fractionated coconut oil.
    Thanks for your help i've just looked at coconut oil on the web and it looks very reasonably priced at ú10 for a litre
    when your walking through hell walk faster !
    old enough to be mature - young enough to act plain stupid

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