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  1. #1

    Default How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    I'm new to the board and not really familiar with where everyone's from, but I've been wondering...how is men's fragrance regarded in your culture? *Is is very common for men, of any age or profession to wear fragrance and are only certain kinds of fragrances preferred, etc.? *Does your country have regional or religious differences regarding this topic? *

    Herb Lady

  2. #2

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    I'm also curious about cultural preferences (if any) towards certain notes. I had never heard of Kouros or anything like it before I met basenotes, and yet here it is- a best selling frag.

    Americans are brainwashed from day one that any odor, blemish, imperfection, or other flaw instantly renders them sexually unappealing and they will die alone because of it. I don't know if it's that bad in other countries. From what I hear, there are people who enjoy a more natural smell on other people- not unpleasantly rank, but not as clean as freakin Windex. I have yet to meet that kind of woman here in the states (well, I have met that kind of woman, but she has bad odor problems of her own )

    I would like to live someplace where I could go out wearing Kouros or some other blatantly masculine frag and feel confident that at least SOME people would enjoy it for the same reasons that I do. Wearing Kouros out where I live would be like shaving only the left side of your face. People would stare.


    -ben
    Nihil Obstat Ben


    My Wardrobe

  3. #3

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Nice topic
    Here in Egypt, fragrances are not very common. when I found basenotes, I found people talking about some scents such as Cool Water and ADG as scents that every body wears. There's no such a thing here in Egypt. Some of these scents I don't know how they smell till now
    I don't know any one except for me who is mad about fragrances - Although I have tried a few fragrances. Generally, having one scent is more than enough for most Egyptians and it is not always noticed by others - at least no one notices I am wearing fragrances, but I enjoy them though.
    Getting samples for scents is not easy here, you cannot easily get samples for all fragrances you want to try.
    price and the currency difference can be one of the reasons for people not to wear fragrances. Fragrances in Egypt are more expensive than in America or Europe - some time can get to double the price in some expensive stores, and the mean income in Egypt is less than in Europe and America.

  4. #4

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    A gentleman or lady is never fully dressed without wearing fragrance. Gentlemen are expected to carry a handcherchief, I usually have the fragrance of the day on it.
    "A great perfume is a work of art, it can lift our days, haunt our nights and create the milestones of our memories. Fragrance is liquid emotion. And that never goes out of fashion. " MICHAEL EDWARDS

  5. #5

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Most people here use it. It starts in the end of elementary school, usually. It's something everybody ought to have but not really something people talk about. Many people have their frags from christmas presents. You can't find anything niche here in Denmark at all. People tend to stick with the most common brands like Armani, Lacoste, Gaultier and Hugo Boss. If I need anything special I have to get it in other countries. :-[

  6. #6

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Quote Originally Posted by aubrgene
    A gentleman or lady is never fully dressed without wearing fragrance. * Gentlemen are expected to carry a handcherchief, I usually have the fragrance of the day on it.
    Very interesting responses so far...thank you.

    But Aubrgene - you didn't indicate where you were from or what culture you're talking about. You don't have to of course and I would understand your desire for privacy - just curious. Guessing from your cultural description, I wondered if you might be talking about France.

    I live in the United States (Northeast) close to New York City, so of course many men here wear fragrance. But we have here such a diverse group of different cultural, religious and socio-economic backgrounds from all over the world, and I wonder what cultural habits men bring with them from their original homes that would determine their taste in fragrance.

    When I was growing up, many older heterosexual men would wear aftershave, but not cologne, which they felt was worn only by gay men. Fortunately, that stereotype is no longer believed by younger generations of men here, such as my husband or our nephews. My great-uncles used to wear these hair tonics that simply reeked.

    As for Americans always wanting to smell clean, I've found that the reasoning may be a combination of our early Puritan immigrants believing 'cleanliness is next to Godliness', but more importantly, we've historically have a plentiful supply of clean and inexpensive water, unlike so many other parts of the world (depending upon what part of the country you're in though, that has changed somewhat). I used to work for a European boss who once told me that Americans smell like soap, which completely surprised me. I hadn't thought we smelled like anything.

  7. #7

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Quote Originally Posted by Herb Lady
    When I was growing up, many older heterosexual men would wear aftershave, but not cologne, which they felt was worn only by gay men. Fortunately, that stereotype is no longer believed by younger generations of men here, such as my husband or our nephews. My great-uncles used to wear these hair tonics that simply reeked.
    This is exactly what I was thinking. Im from the states (Colorado) and it seems like the decision of whether to wear a scent or not depends mostly on ideas about the masculine role in society.

    Notice that older companies such as Dior, Guerlain, Chanel, etc, made TONS of feminine scents, almost on a yearly basis, all the way back to their beginnings. A masculine frag came out maybe once a decade. Now, ideas about gender attributes in the states (particularly in large metro areas) are more loosely defined. Masculine scents - many of which actually smell quite feminine these days - are released in droves.

    I would imagine that fewer people wear scents in more patriarchal cultures with strict masculine identity codes. How many native Japanese Basenoters do we have? I would imagine not many. If you are one though, more power to you!
    "It's not what you look like when you're doing what you're doing; it's what you're doing when you're doing what you look like you're doing."

  8. #8

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Hi all,
    This is an interesting question, and I’m glad that someone brought it up. I’m sure that preferences and attitudes toward fragrances differ based on country, region, and many different facets of culture. For example, I have moved a lot within the US, and have found very different attitudes moving from the West Coast to the East Coast and back. Here in Portland, Oregon I would say people are still really conservative about wearing fragrances, especially males. This area still has this frontier/hippy vibe that holds to an earthier ethic. I know that there are pockets of people in specific “sub-cultures” (like attorneys) that wear daily fragrances more commonly, but I would say that 90% of the men that I interact with daily wear NO fragrances at all daily (I’m a psychologist, and I interact with a pretty wide variety of folks through my week.) I’m sure that a fair number of those have a bottle of Polo or Cool Water stashed somewhere for special occasions, but even out at nice restaurants I rarely smell people wearing anything.
    The pervasive attitude here, in a large part of the culture, seems to be that fragrances on men should be VERY subtle, or left at home. It has not happened to me, but people wearing even noticeable amounts sometimes get asked to leave restaurants, busses, and elevators. It seems to rank up there somewhere with secondhand smoke. Until I moved to the East Coast at age 18 NONE of my peers, male or female ever wore fragrances. It is just not something we are raised with here.
    That being said, I live in a predominantly African American neighborhood, and I smell a lot of fragrances on men around here these days. My neighbors joke that you will find a bottle of Michael Kors in every bathroom.
    So, I am clearly living in the right neighborhood….

    -Slim
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  9. #9

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    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Well, I'm from Brazil and right here almost everybody wears fragrances.
    Most of the people own often 1or 2 bottles (1 for daily wear and another for special occasions). Although Brazil is a third world country, people wear the national colognes as O Boticário, L'Acqua di Fiori etc. These colognes are cheaper and are EDC or even a category that only exists here: Deo Cologne (even weaker than EDC) *
    The Deo colognes are generally worn by the poorest people and vanishes in 30 minutes - 1 hour. It's common to see people reapplying fragrances.
    The foreign fragrances are extremely expensive here: first of all, because of the import taxes: 60% plus! The currency is another factor that increases the value of the product (1 US$ = 2.2 R$).
    It's interesting to see that the designer fragrances, normally in EDT strength, caused a great impression when they started to be worn by the richest and something interesting happened: everybody in Brazil likes strong, rich, with a lot of sillage fragrances!
    Nobody here wants to pay a hideous price to smell a fainty watery fragrance... Everybody wants intoxicating fragrances and for that reason, the classics are the most worn here (for those who can afford). Azzaro, Kouros, Lapidus, Polo are best selling here!
    There's a general consensus that if you wear a fragrance, you must be noticed. So, It's unthinkable to invite a person to leave a restaurant just because his fragrance is too loud.

  10. #10

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Everyone I know owns at least a few bottles of fragrance, although many don't bother wearing it every day. I can't imagine anyone not owning some Hugo Boss, Swiss Army, or similar. I'm still in high school and I think that has something to do with it: it's already hard enough to sit still in one place for hours within 3 feet of four other people without their perfume mixing with yours and making you nauseous.

    On a class trip to Spain last year I remember we spent almost all our time at the airport in the perfume section of the Duty Free. When we go out we can't walk by the perfume section without trying something new.

    However, I don't think anyone would feel their virility threatened because they are wearing cologne... That's really quite insecure. And kind of funny too. If American men are really of such feeble masculinity, then that explains a lot.

    I live in Canada, in Montreal, but almost everyone in my school are third-generation Italian immigrants, so maybe that has something to do with it.

  11. #11

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    From what I've heard, Montreal is rather different culturally from the rest of Canada, so it would be interesting to hear what other Canadians think about this issue.

    But I think your views are more in line with Americans of the same age as yourself; it's older American men in some regions who have differing views regarding fragrance.


  12. #12

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Good points Herb Lady, I can still remember the scent of Aqua Velva after shave on my grandfather, but he'd never wear a cologne or EDT, it just wasn't done by his generation. My dad had some Chaps, and Old Spice he'd wear for special occassions but never every day.

    Seems like the culture in NY at least is much more accepting of men wearing fragrances, especially since the birth of Metro-sexuals, and magazines catering to men, such as GQ, Esquire, Cargo, FHM, and Maxim. Fragrances for men seemed to take off along with skin care products, and designer clothing.

    My dad thinks men are getting too soft, and losing their place in society, maybe so, but we smell alot better.

  13. #13

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Men rarely wear frags in south Louisiana. Usually a man will have a bottle of Acqua di Gio, Cool Water, or something similar in popularity laying about that he received like, three xmases ago.

    I buy my boyfriend Creed frags and other stuff that we both like. He is the only man I detect any scent on on a daily basis (and I am around a ton of men every day).

    Guys just aren't into it down here for the most part. I do notice if I ever catch a scent on a guy it is usually a black guy, but down here they tend to take care of themselves better than the white guys do (not stereotyping here, so please no one get upset. I'm not saying this is fact--it's just what I've observed from living here for so long). For instance, I will see black guys getting manicures, etc. They definitely dress better. The white guys are generally pretty big rednecks. I think they must feel wearing fragrance is girly in some way.

  14. #14

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Culturally, fragrances (on men) are widely regarded as somewhat effeminate. Yes, the marketing can say otherwise, women certainly do. Most men still have a hard time with it.
    The post regarding the fragility of the masculine image in American culture, is largely accurate.

    For women it doesnt seem to be an issue.

    United States


  15. #15
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    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Quote Originally Posted by Herb Lady
    From what I've heard, Montreal is rather different culturally from the rest of Canada, so it would be interesting to hear what other Canadians think about this issue.

    But I think your views are more in line with Americans of the same age as yourself; it's older American men in some regions who have differing views regarding fragrance.
    I live in Montreal now as well but I've lived in 2 other major canadian cities and visited 1 more so Ottawa, Toronto and Vancouver and we're all pretty fragrant. Montreal is more nichey, Ottawa is more "safe" citrusy scents, Toronto is more high end designer scents and Vancouver I only visited shortly so I couldnt make a definite say but I definatley smelled alot of frags around downtown.

  16. #16

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Quote Originally Posted by gooderin
    Men rarely wear frags in south Louisiana. Usually a man will have a bottle of Acqua di Gio, Cool Water, or something similar in popularity laying about that he received like, three xmases ago.

    I buy my boyfriend Creed frags and other stuff that we both like. He is the only man I detect any scent on on a daily basis (and I am around a ton of men every day).
    Do you think that the heat and humidity of Lousiana has anything to do with it?

  17. #17

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    In India, fragrance permeates our culture (as a whole). I'm a Muslim, and we have a lot of perfume oils being used - culturally. Incense sticks (which smell of Sandalwood, Khus (vetiver) etc etc) are all too common. If you go to any temple or mosque, you'll find a lot of people using perfume oils (attars), the ones very common to India are Sandalwood, Musk, Henna, Khus, Mogra (don't know the name of the flower!), Jasmine etc are all too regularly used by people. However, in the streets, its a different matter, most people don't use perfume a lot (or even a little).... or for that matter, deos. As an Indian - due to the heritage, Perfume is all over the place, and due to the religious aspect (Muslim), it is also used (one must be clean, and smell good, so to say).

    Apart from that, I have a general liking for perfumes, as I mentioned in an earlier thread, the more exotic ones to me are Xeryus, Grey Flannel, Gentleman, Swiss Army, and the common ones seem to me Gucci Envy, Gucci PH (because of the spices I guess). Since spices like clove, cardamom, cinnamon etc are a vital ingredient of the day to day food here, the incensy/spicy types of perfumes fail to impress .

  18. #18

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Quote Originally Posted by AK3D
    In India, fragrance permeates our culture (as a whole). I'm a Muslim, and we have a lot of perfume oils being used - culturally. Incense sticks (which smell of Sandalwood, Khus (vetiver) etc etc) are all too common. If you go to any temple or mosque, you'll find a lot of people using perfume oils (attars), the ones very common to India are Sandalwood, Musk, Henna, Khus, Mogra (don't know the name of the flower!), Jasmine etc are all too regularly used by people. However, in the streets, its a different matter, most people don't use perfume a lot (or even a little).... or for that matter, deos. As an Indian - due to the heritage, Perfume is all over the place, and due to the religious aspect (Muslim), it is also used (one must be clean, and smell good, so to say).

    Apart from that, I have a general liking for perfumes, as I mentioned in an earlier thread, the more exotic ones to me are Xeryus, Grey Flannel, Gentleman, Swiss Army, and the common ones seem to me Gucci Envy, Gucci PH (because of the spices I guess). Since spices like clove, cardamom, cinnamon etc are a vital ingredient of the day to day food here, the incensy/spicy types of perfumes fail to impress .

    That was a cool description you gave of your city. I immediately thought of Nautica Voyage as the extreme opposite from you describe as common! If spicy scents blend in, I'll bet the nautica line would stand out.

    -ben
    Nihil Obstat Ben


    My Wardrobe

  19. #19

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Quote Originally Posted by czesc
    [quote author=Herb Lady link=1145847023/0#10 date=1145930334]From what I've heard, Montreal is rather different culturally from the rest of Canada, so it would be interesting to hear what other Canadians think about this issue. *

    But I think your views are more in line with Americans of the same age as yourself; it's older American men in some regions who have differing views regarding fragrance.
    I live in Montreal now as well but I've lived in 2 other major canadian cities and visited 1 more so Ottawa, Toronto and Vancouver and we're all pretty fragrant. Montreal is more nichey, Ottawa is more "safe" citrusy scents, Toronto is more high end designer scents and Vancouver I only visited shortly so I couldnt make a definite say but I definatley smelled alot of frags around downtown.[/quote]

    Thanks for the information regarding Canadian preferences. It seemed logical that a country as large as Canada would have regional differences.

    I also had no idea that certain parts of the USA were still as conservative as reported above, regarding men's fragrance.

    I'd love to hear more about Asia and Australia/New Zealand, from any members there. Also, regardless of the country, is there any sort of specific "fragrance culture" in the gay community? I have no idea what that would be, but am just wondering.

    Even for women, there are such expections as to what type of fragrances we should wear, based upon our backgrounds, professions, ages or even geographical locations. But as it's considered more socially acceptable in most of the USA, and probably the world, for women to be passionate about fragrance, I find it interesting to learn more about how all men indulge this passion within their own community.

  20. #20

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Quote Originally Posted by AK3D
    In India, fragrance permeates our culture (as a whole). I'm a Muslim, and we have a lot of perfume oils being used - culturally. Incense sticks (which smell of Sandalwood, Khus (vetiver) etc etc) are all too common. If you go to any temple or mosque, you'll find a lot of people using perfume oils (attars), the ones very common to India are Sandalwood, Musk, Henna, Khus, Mogra (don't know the name of the flower!), Jasmine etc are all too regularly used by people. However, in the streets, its a different matter, most people don't use perfume a lot (or even a little).... or for that matter, deos. As an Indian - due to the heritage, Perfume is all over the place, and due to the religious aspect (Muslim), it is also used (one must be clean, and smell good, so to say).

    Apart from that, I have a general liking for perfumes, as I mentioned in an earlier thread, the more exotic ones to me are Xeryus, Grey Flannel, Gentleman, Swiss Army, and the common ones seem to me Gucci Envy, Gucci PH (because of the spices I guess). Since spices like clove, cardamom, cinnamon etc are a vital ingredient of the day to day food here, the incensy/spicy types of perfumes fail to impress .
    Thanks for the information about both India and Muslim culture - how interesting! And how especially interesting that you actually like some of the less spicy scents, because of what you're familiar with on a daily basis. What does henna smell like? I thought it was just used as a dye.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Quote Originally Posted by Herb Lady
    [quote author=czesc link=1145847023/0#14 date=1145944968][quote author=Herb Lady link=1145847023/0#10 date=1145930334]From what I've heard, Montreal is rather different culturally from the rest of Canada, so it would be interesting to hear what other Canadians think about this issue.

    But I think your views are more in line with Americans of the same age as yourself; it's older American men in some regions who have differing views regarding fragrance.
    I live in Montreal now as well but I've lived in 2 other major canadian cities and visited 1 more so Ottawa, Toronto and Vancouver and we're all pretty fragrant. Montreal is more nichey, Ottawa is more "safe" citrusy scents, Toronto is more high end designer scents and Vancouver I only visited shortly so I couldnt make a definite say but I definatley smelled alot of frags around downtown.[/quote]

    Thanks for the information regarding Canadian preferences. It seemed logical that a country as large as Canada would have regional differences.

    I also had no idea that certain parts of the USA were still as conservative as reported above, regarding men's fragrance.

    I'd love to hear more about Asia and Australia/New Zealand, from any members there. Also, regardless of the country, is there any sort of specific "fragrance culture" in the gay community? I have no idea what that would be, but am just wondering.

    Even for women, there are such expections as to what type of fragrances we should wear, based upon our backgrounds, professions, ages or even geographical locations. But as it's considered more socially acceptable in most of the USA, and probably the world, for women to be passionate about fragrance, I find it interesting to learn more about how all men indulge this passion within their own community. [/quote]

    When I moved to Montreal I noticed that most of the salespeople here at fragrance counters are either really pretty 20 something girls or old ladies, while in Ottawa there was ALOT of gay guys working fragrance counters. Here in Montreal I haven't ran into one yet and I've done alot of frag shopping. Idonno if this helps at all it was just an observation I had made. Another thing I could add in is that most of the gay guys in Ottawa really knew what they were talking about when it came to the products and history and just perfume in general, while alot of the fragrance counter girls here just know the basics (like what familyies the featured scents of the week are in and the major notes, if even that) other than that they dont know much. They just spray it on you and tell you that you smell good then smile and act pretty so you buy it ! LOL

  22. #22

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Quote Originally Posted by Herb Lady
    [quote author=gooderin link=1145847023/0#12 date=1145938792]Men rarely wear frags in south Louisiana. Usually a man will have a bottle of Acqua di Gio, Cool Water, or something similar in popularity laying about that he received like, three xmases ago.

    I buy my boyfriend Creed frags and other stuff that we both like. He is the only man I detect any scent on on a daily basis (and I am around a ton of men every day).
    Do you think that the heat and humidity of Lousiana has anything to do with it?
    [/quote]

    Possibly; however, I think the whole outdoorsy, fishing and hunting lifestyle most of the men lead down here just doesn't go with frags. They are more into having GIGANTIC trucks with Rebel flags displayed across the back. :

    I'm one of the few girls I know down here that actually likes a man to wear cologne.

    I hate the heat and humidity down here. I've heard that some people think heat and humidity turns your scent "sour" but personally it just intensifies whatever fragrance I happen to be wearing--so that is the only pro of the heat and humidity. I've lived outside of Louisiana for one year and that was in Nevada. I felt like my frags did not last near as long on my skin in that climate.

  23. #23

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Quote Originally Posted by gooderin

    I'm one of the few girls I know down here that actually likes a man to wear cologne.

    I hate the heat and humidity down here. I've heard that some people think heat and humidity turns your scent "sour" but personally it just intensifies whatever fragrance I happen to be wearing--so that is the only pro of the heat and humidity. I've lived outside of Louisiana for one year and that was in Nevada. I felt like my frags did not last near as long on my skin in that climate.
    Just out of curiousity, have other girls there said WHY they don't like men to wear cologne? *Any cologne? *Do they perceive it as too effeminate or is it something else? *


  24. #24

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Quote Originally Posted by czesc
    *
    When I moved to Montreal I noticed that most of the salespeople here at fragrance counters are either really pretty 20 something girls or old ladies, while in Ottawa there was ALOT of gay guys working fragrance counters. Here in Montreal I haven't ran into one yet and I've done alot of frag shopping. Idonno if this helps at all it was just an observation I had made. Another thing I could add in is that most of the gay guys in Ottawa really knew what they were talking about when it came to the products and history and just perfume in general, while alot of the fragrance counter girls here just know the basics (like what familyies the featured scents of the week are in and the major notes, if even that) other than that they dont know much. They just spray it on you and tell you that you smell good then smile and act pretty so you buy it ! LOL
    Um, okay. *Not quite what I meant about fragrance in the gay community, but interesting in a "did you get suckered into buying whatever scents the 20-something year old pretty girls showed you after melting you with their flirtatious glances?" sort of way. *Hopefully that just illustrates that an experienced and knowledgeable salesperson, regardless of sexual orientation, is much more useful to the consumer. *

    What I really meant is if within the gay community, are there any sort of expectations or etiquette or preferences regarding men's fragrance? *Again, I have no idea if this would even be so, and mean no offense by it at all, but simply wonder if this varies at all from the straight community. * For instance, two of my uncles, whom are gay, wear vastly different fragrances from each other, but both were experimenting with fragrance (and much more interesting ones) much sooner than my heterosexual uncles. * *However, my husband's cousin, who is also gay, is a Mid-Westerner and rather conservative by nature, and his fragrance reflects that. *But I have no idea if that's really a personal preference or a reality of where he lives and works.

    I appreciate the honesty and insights here because this is one of those topics where people are understandably curious about others and their customs (Americans are especially curious people), but you don't want to keep asking someone you know the same type of questions, making them feel like they have to constantly be the spokesperson for their entire culture/gender/ethnic background/race/age group/, etc., rather than just being treated as another human being. *

    Anyway, I look forward to more responses and again, thanks for sharing!

    Herb Lady

  25. #25

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    I find this fascinating, hopefully we can have "reporters" from as many Countries as possible. In the northeast US, you're allowed to wear cologne, even on an everyday basis, but its usually boring as hell like ADG, Polo Blue, etc.

    When people find something vaguely interesting such as M7, Habit Rouge, etc. they get very weireded out. But it's becoming more acceptable to wear fragrances in general so that's a start at least.

    Por Ejemplo: My roomate from maine used to chastize me all the time for loving fragrances. However he secretly got really into it because throughout the year he got Chrome, than Blue Note, now hes gonna get reaction and ADG as well.

    So clearly, he's stuck on the boring stuff. but he even knows to wear sum in warmer weather, some in cooler weather!

    So as it's becoming less and less important to be ignorant of hygeine to be considered a "true male" i predict colognes will be more and more acceptable to be worn loudly, and often!

    However niche fragrances will never be popular, because their not supposed to be! and expensive as well.

  26. #26

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    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    I find there is an age divison noticeable.

    - Grandpa: hair groom and shave lotion or a light (no-name) cologne, as everybody uses in their bathroom.
    - Daddy: has two or three good label colognes he uses on special occasions. One may have been an xmas gift or from his fiancée, and more than 20 years old.
    - The young generation (boys and girls) seem to have a favorite past time: sniffing at colognes on saturdays. They mostly come in groups or as a couple. They also buy, and I assume they have a lot at home. Younger bankers wear colognes regularly under their white shirts and ties. Public traffic between 7 and 9 in the morning: you get an idea of what must be in - dry and peppery stuff seems to project especially well! Loud is a no-no, and these scents are really less noticeable during the day - if at all!

    But these strong, manly, individualists also exist: shave lotion maybe, cologne - never.
    And if you met them socially - you wouldn't know the difference!

    Herb Lady, curious concerning gay preferences: I think gay males are as different from one another as straight men are. So he will choose from the whole palette, or maybe nothing! With a bigger budget than a daddy or husband has to spend on himself, he may buy the more expensive stuff. Some more extrovert types have always been male fashion trendsetters, from camouflage trousers to pink sweaters. Why shouldn't these have been the first to wear Mugler's colognes, or a straightforward female frag? It sounds to me that some in the gay crowd may have things in common with some afroamerican guys: a special consciousness of how they dress and, perhaps, how they smell? It's always good to know where your allies are, Louisiana in this case!
    I have friends in Germany and they tell me similar stories, none of them lives in a big city.
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  27. #27

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Here in Tampere, Finland, guy wearing fragrance is almost rule, not exception. Almost exclusively Hugo Boss fragrances, Le Male and AdG. But when a guy is actually interested in fragrances, there is something wrong with him. Really sad.

  28. #28

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Can anyone help me with this? *I want to quote two or three posts from other people on this thread, into my post, so that I can respond to what's being reported back. *Is there a way to do that or must I only quote one person/one post each time?

    Thanks!

    Herb Lady

  29. #29
    foetidus's Avatar
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    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Quote Originally Posted by Herb Lady
    Can anyone help me with this? *I want to quote two or three posts from other people on this thread, into my post, so that I can respond to what's being reported back. *Is there a way to do that or must I only quote one person/one post each time?

    Thanks!

    Herb Lady
    I've never done it, but if I wanted to try, I would run two windows and copy and paste from the 2nd window to my responding reply post.

  30. #30

    Default Re: How is fragrance regarded in your culture?

    Quote Originally Posted by foetidus
    [quote author=Herb Lady link=1145847023/15#27 date=1146358663]Can anyone help me with this? I want to quote two or three posts from other people on this thread, into my post, so that I can respond to what's being reported back. Is there a way to do that or must I only quote one person/one post each time?

    Thanks!

    Herb Lady
    I've never done it, but if I wanted to try, I would run two windows and copy and paste from the 2nd window to my responding reply post.
    [/quote]

    Yep. I would right-click on the "quote" link for each quote you want to use, and open a new window for each. Then copy and paste from those into the first. Hope this helps!

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