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  1. #1

    Default Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so...

    Ok, we all know that categorising fragrances has much to do with marketing, but there are some fragrances marketed as "unisex" which probably fit better into a male or female category.
    Here are some which are obvious to me.
    What would you add to the list - or what would you change?

    06130 Cedre - masculine
    CDG Avignon - masculine
    CDG Kyoto - masculine
    Creed Millesime Imperial - masculine
    Diptyque Tam Dao - masculine
    Diptyque Philosykos - feminine (I'm going to get flamed for this one)
    Diptyque Eau Lente - feminine
    L'Artisan Navegar - masculine
    L'Artisan Mechant Loup - masculine
    L'Artisan L'Eau de L'Artisan - feminine
    L'Artisan Timbuktu - masculine
    Malle Musc Ravageur - masculine
    Malle Bigarade concentree - masculine
    Malle L'Eau d'Hiver - feminine
    MPG Racine - masculine (MPG market this for men, but basenotes strangely rate it as unisex)

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so!

    Interesting opinions. It is refreshing to see someone analyzing and deciding such things for himself rather than simply following orthodoxy. I'd be much more interested, however, in which qualities of the 'fumes that led you to classify them in this way. What, to you, makes something "masculine" or "feminine" (or "unisex&quot?

    I've been thinking a fair bit about that myself lately. I certainly think it is a mistake to anosmicallly follow the manufacturer's classification, as one's own nose tends to be a better judge (hopefully). I certainly have an inclination to separate fragrances as tending to be more feminine or more masculine, but it tends to be more along a spectrum than with a clear sharply defined border. I'm also willing to venture a fair distance toward the feminine side in my wearing practices, while there are some that I just won't wear because they are "too fem". In my book that tends to mean heavily floral or aldehydic floral fragrances: rose, tuberose, lily, lily-of-the-valley among the notes that applied too heavily render a 'fume unwearable for me.

    Among the examples you have shared, for example, I find Timbuktu to be well into the unisex camp, for the presence of prominent floral and fruit notes therein. Eau Lente also unisex, although I'd like to claim it as masculine for when I would wear it.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so!

    That's a fair call. Let's think about it in the context of Philosykos.

    Why do we usually associate sweet florals with women and other sweet woods/leathers/muscs/etc with men?
    Are we conditioned at an early age?
    Girls are sugar & spice and all things nice... isn't that how it goes?
    Women who cross our paths every day tend to wear florals and other sweet fragrances.

    So, even though I wouldn't say that I think a fig tree smells feminine - and nor would society - I think in this case, that the reason I think of Philosykos as feminine is that it is so sweet - AND that I have not been conditioned into linking this particular variety of sweetness with what a man should smell like.

    Unlike sandalwood, cedar, musk, lavender and others which have been linked to men for generations.
    Perhaps all sweet scents start as feminine until we create enough mental links to men to declare it can also be masculine?
    That said, if enough male fragrances emerge with sweet fig notes, it will create mental links between masculity and the sweetness of the fig tree - and eventually, Philosykos becomes masculine.

    Linking fragrance to gender may be an evolving illusion, but at any point in time, perhaps the illusion is real?

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    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so!

    Quote Originally Posted by musky_monkey
    Girls are sugar & spice and all things nice... isn't that how it goes?
    And boys are snakes and snails and puppy dog tails.

    I don't think I'd like to smell that....

    bonni
    "Love is when a girl puts on perfume and a boy puts on shaving cologne and they go out and smell each other."
    -Karl, age 5

  5. #5

    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so!

    Musc Ravageur more masculine? Interesting. I think it`s very unisex, but still more suitable for women. Definitely so.

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    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so!

    Diptyque Eau Lente feminine? I think not! This has become one of my top ten favorite frags. Way too strong and spicy to be considered feminine.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so!

    Quote Originally Posted by Pigeon Murderer
    Musc Ravageur more masculine? Interesting. I think it`s very unisex, but still more suitable for women. Definitely so.
    Strange isn't it?
    I think MR is masculine, you think it's feminine - perhaps it's more balanced than I realised.
    Given the basenote's prestige of MR, I can't wait to get more opinions...

    Oh - and don't forget to add some other "unisex" fragrances to the list with your opinion of it's gender.
    I'm interested in hearing some more opinions...

  8. #8

    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so!

    Quote Originally Posted by bonni
    [quote author=musky_monkey link=1144987268/0#2 date=1144994315]
    Girls are sugar & spice and all things nice... isn't that how it goes?
    And boys are snakes and snails and puppy dog tails.

    I don't think I'd like to smell that....

    bonni[/quote]

    If boys are snakes and snails and puppy dog tails, then men must be farts and burps? Eau de Flatulence? Oh wait, that's me. ;D

    Unisex, whatev. Everyone should just wear whatever pleases them. Hell, if a guy wanted to wear the girliest scent ever, fine by me. Would I make out with him? No. But I have a feeling if he's spritzing, oh say, Gucci Envy Me all over himself, then he probably wouldn't be after me anyway.

    I try not to pay attention to Unisex, Fem or Masc designations. If it suits me, it suits me.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so!

    Oh dear...
    I hope this thread doesn't turn into a self-righteous debate about the validity of women wearing mens fragrances and vice versa.
    Please no!

    I agree that people should wear what they want.
    I hope this thread just considers fragrances in the context of your impressions as to its gender - and regardless of what you think of the gender, wear it if you want...
    I'm hoping that we may be able to debunk some of the marketing surrounding some fragrances.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so!

    Quote Originally Posted by musky_monkey
    Oh dear...
    I hope this thread doesn't turn into a self-righteous debate about the validity of women wearing mens fragrances and vice versa.
    Please no!

    I agree that people should wear what they want.
    I hope this thread just considers fragrances in the context of your impressions as to its gender - and regardless of what you think of the gender, wear it if you want...
    I'm hoping that we may be able to debunk some of the marketing surrounding some fragrances.
    Sorry, musky, didn't mean to get off track!

    While I do feel people should wear what they want (and I would certainly never be self-righteous about it!), I do have opinions on certain "unisex frags," so here's my two cents, keeping within the theme of the original post

    To my nose, most scents marketed as unisex lean more toward the masculine: Thierry Mugler cologne and Creed Imperial Millesime are a couple off the top of my head.

    However, I had no idea Light Blue was marketed as a unisex scent until someone told me. I think it is very feminine.

    It is very rare that I sniff a "unisex" scent and think, hmm, this is suitable for both my boyfriend and myself.

    We've all acknowledged all over Basenotes that body chemistry has a lot to do with the way a scent develops on someone. Last weekend, when I was visiting my boyfriend, I had forgotten my perfume, so I sprayed on his Issey Miyake Summer 2002 Edition (not unisex, but I'm getting to my point...). This cologne has always smelled so much like a man to me. I love the way it smells on the bf. Strangely though, after a masculine opening, it became something very different on my skin and smelled decidedly feminine. Hours later someone commented on how good I smelled and I was like, "I don't smell like a boy, do I?" and they said I indeed did not. So, in my opinion, the marketing of scents as unisex is pretty brilliant on the parts of companies--they know they have a good chance of it suiting someone--it's like they are casting a wider net. I'm sure this is a trend that will be around for a while...part of me thinks this is good, as I end up trying things I usually wouldn't (the only reason I sprayed on that Issey Miyake was because I was desperate. I've never had the urge to try it before because it was created for a man). But it can be sort of confusing at times!

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so!

    Quote Originally Posted by musky_monkey
    06130 Cedre - masculine
    CDG Avignon - masculine
    CDG Kyoto - masculine
    Creed Millesime Imperial - masculine
    Diptyque Tam Dao - masculine
    Diptyque Philosykos - feminine (I'm going to get flamed for this one)
    Diptyque Eau Lente - feminine
    L'Artisan Navegar - masculine
    L'Artisan Mechant Loup - masculine
    L'Artisan L'Eau de L'Artisan - feminine
    L'Artisan Timbuktu - masculine
    Malle Musc Ravageur - masculine
    Malle Bigarade concentree - masculine
    Malle L'Eau d'Hiver - feminine
    MPG Racine - masculine (MPG market this for men, but basenotes strangely rate it as unisex)
    Quote Originally Posted by musky_monkey
    I'm hoping that we may be able to debunk some of the marketing surrounding some fragrances.
    if I recall correctly, most of these fragrances are not labeled as "UNISEX," they are simply uncategorized. where is the fault in that?
    "He was some kind of a man... What does it matter what you say about people?"

  12. #12

    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so!

    Quote Originally Posted by Hobo Joe Junkpan
    if I recall correctly, most of these fragrances are not labeled as "UNISEX," they are simply uncategorized. where is the fault in that?
    Oh dear... please read 3 posts back...

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    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so...

    Quote Originally Posted by musky_monkey
    Ok, we all know that categorising fragrances has much to do with marketing, but there are some fragrances marketed as "unisex" which probably fit better into a male or female category.
    Here are some which are obvious to me.
    What would you add to the list - or what would you change?

    06130 Cedre - masculine
    CDG Avignon - masculine
    CDG Kyoto - masculine
    Creed Millesime Imperial - masculine
    Diptyque Tam Dao - masculine
    Diptyque Philosykos - feminine (I'm going to get flamed for this one)
    Diptyque Eau Lente - feminine
    L'Artisan Navegar - masculine
    L'Artisan Mechant Loup - masculine
    L'Artisan L'Eau de L'Artisan - feminine
    L'Artisan Timbuktu - masculine
    Malle Musc Ravageur - masculine
    Malle Bigarade concentree - masculine
    Malle L'Eau d'Hiver - feminine
    MPG Racine - masculine (MPG market this for men, but basenotes strangely rate it as unisex)

    Very Interesting *MM ~ I agree on a few but found myself saying....hey wait no way....on quite a few. its not just that i wear men's perfume. *I adore wearing BdP and i consider it a masculine scent. i don't put it in the unisex category just because I wear it and being a woman now say its feminine or unisex. *I think that fact that
    many agree & disagree with your personal categories, for me, shows how most of these scents really are unisex. *If we're split as to which camp they go in....then they probably really are in both and then each of us with our own bent toward what makes something masculine or feminine decides for ourselves. i think there are some fragrnaces which a large pecent of both women and men would agree to which gender the scent belongs to. *I think if you get people being pulled in both directions is probably a good indictor that its unisex

    here's my own feelings for the scents you listed. Please note....I am not correcting you.....we are both right, i just have different associations with these scents as far as gender or non-gender specific to me.

    06130 Cedre - masculine *Agree
    CDG Avignon - masculine truly Unisex in my opinion
    CDG Kyoto - masculine * * truly Unisex in my opinion
    Creed Millesime Imperial - masculine ~ agree
    Diptyque Tam Dao - masculine ~ Unisex but leaning toward the masculine side though
    Diptyque Philosykos - feminine (I'm going to get flamed for this one) Unisex leaning towards feminine
    Diptyque Eau Lente - feminine ` truly unisex
    L'Artisan Navegar - masculine ` Agree even though poivre is much stronger pepper scent and made for women....and i'd say unisex for poivre....hmmm
    L'Artisan Mechant Loup - masculine ~ agree
    L'Artisan L'Eau de L'Artisan - feminine ~ Unisex
    L'Artisan Timbuktu - masculine ~ unisex
    Malle Musc Ravageur - masculine ` I'd say feminine and wearable by men
    Malle Bigarade concentree - masculine ` unisex
    Malle L'Eau d'Hiver - feminine Agree
    MPG Racine - masculine (MPG market this for men, but basenotes strangely rate it as unisex) Agree
    [/quote]

    Quote Originally Posted by docluv45
    Interesting opinions. It is refreshing to see someone analyzing and deciding such things for himself rather than simply following orthodoxy. I'd be much more interested, however, in which qualities of the 'fumes that led you to classify them in this way. What, to you, makes something "masculine" or "feminine" (or "unisex&quot?

    I've been thinking a fair bit about that myself lately. I certainly think it is a mistake to anosmicallly follow the manufacturer's classification, as one's own nose tends to be a better judge (hopefully). I certainly have an inclination to separate fragrances as tending to be more feminine or more masculine, but it tends to be more along a spectrum than with a clear sharply defined border. I'm also willing to venture a fair distance toward the feminine side in my wearing practices, while there are some that I just won't wear because they are "too fem". In my book that tends to mean heavily floral or aldehydic floral fragrances: rose, tuberose, lily, lily-of-the-valley among the notes that applied too heavily render a 'fume unwearable for me.
    Great question BTW ~ in reading your question to MM & I tried to answer this for myself.....and what i found was for me determining what makes a scent masculine or feminine is not easy...... I see woods as unisex but when they are harsh smelling to me.....I throw it in the men's category I could say florals are feminine but that's too general ~ certainly scents that have a high percentage of florals seem feminine to me....but rose to me is the exception...... and I know it simply has to do with my exposure to oud based scents which seem to include strong rose in its formulas......If I had answered this question a couple of years ago I'd have said Rose is typically feminine. Other florals like LotV & soliflores in general i see as feminine. Carnation due to its peppery quality i see as unisex......It really is such a personal thing.....i don't even know how to put it into words but there are men's scents that just smell like MEN'S cologne. Not sure if its a specific note but there's a quality that just reminds me of a TYPICAL men's cologne formula.....a genearal ding that goes off in my head that says dept store men's cologne. Anything that smells harsh to my nose or extremely strong & non-floral or anything that has a severe burnt note i see as masculine and is often personally where i draw the line as far as wearability for me.


    I'd love to hear how MM & others classifly scents for themselves as masculine or feminine or unisex

    Diane

  14. #14

    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so...

    Quote Originally Posted by Buffalo_Gal
    I think if you get people being pulled in both directions is probably a good indictor that its unisex
    Great response Buffalo_Gal - we can always depend on you.
    You're right. What I set as a tough subjective question was made even tougher by docluv45 adding the objective spin to it - great stuff docluv45!

    Quote Originally Posted by Buffalo_Gal
    ...It really is such a personal thing.....i don't even know how to put it into words but there are men's scents that just smell like MEN'S cologne. Not sure if its a specific note but there's a quality that just reminds me of a TYPICAL men's cologne formula.....a general ding that goes off in my head that says dept store men's cologne. Anything that smells harsh to my nose or extremely strong & non-floral or anything that has a severe burnt note i see as masculine and is often personally where i draw the line as far as wearability for me.
    I think this is right on track.
    I'm working on the theory that by default we associate most sweet smells with femininity - BUT if we smell a sweet note worn by men enough times (or marketed enough), that we then create the mental link to shift it from women only to also being suitable for men also - or even further to men only.
    Therefore, since sandalwood/cedar etc are so common in mens colognes, I automatically link these notes to masculinity.
    So if sweet fig tree notes become predominant in mens colognes in the future, fragrances like Philosykos will smell masculine even though the recipe is the same as what today smells feminine to me (BTW - I am not knocking Philosykos - I wear Philosykos despite the fact that I consider it feminine because I quite like it).

    I thought it would be interesting to capture a snapshot of how we rate "unisex" fragrances today on a gender scale - it will almost definitely be different in the future and vary according to industry marketing and our own personal experiences.

    ... and you're right, there is no right or wrong amswer to the question. It's all opinion.

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    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so...

    I've had people tell me MI smelled feminine.
    Oriscent, AgarAura Pure Ouds, Creed, LIDGE, Patou Pour Homme, tons of niche and rare stuff for sale!
    http://www.basenotes.net/threads/253...er-100-items!!

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so...

    Quote Originally Posted by AZsmells
    I've had people tell me MI smelled feminine.
    lol, i know exactly what you're talking about.


    Here are some frags that i wore and were called feminine:
    Le Male
    Magnetism
    Musc Ravageur
    Custom National Scent and Intense
    CDG 2
    and
    .
    .
    .
    Yang (Say what?????!!!!!! *:-? :-/ amazing how people's nose differ *> *)
    Current top 5:
    1. Puredistance M
    2. Naomi Goodsir Bois d'Ascese
    3. Amouage Fate Man
    4. Creed Spice & Wood
    5. Bond 9 Harrods Oud

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    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so...

    Excellent discussion here.

    MM: Was wondering your take on Marc Jacobs Men, a modernist "masculine" fragrance with a prominent fig note. I agree that it is interesting to look at history and speculate on the transitions in our gender-scentsibilities over time. Is fig making a move? Time will tell.

    BG: I agree that it is a challenge to pinpoint what about the gestalt of a fragrance experience that makes one's mind think "male" or "female" or "unclassified" (my brain never jumps to "unisex"!), but it is an interesting exercise. Exceptions to the pure scent rule abound as well. I know a woman who loves lavender and likes to smell like it--so I can't automatically put lavender as "the masculine floral", although it sometimes is.

    Thanks for the thoughts, all.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so...

    Quote Originally Posted by musky_monkey
    I think this is right on track.
    I'm working on the theory that by default we associate most sweet smells with femininity - BUT if we smell a sweet note worn by men enough times (or marketed enough), that we then create the mental link to shift it from women only to also being suitable for men also - or even further to men only.
    Therefore, since sandalwood/cedar etc are so common in mens colognes, I automatically link these notes to masculinity.
    So if sweet fig tree notes become predominant in mens colognes in the future, fragrances like Philosykos will smell masculine even though the recipe is the same as what today smells feminine to me (BTW - I am not knocking Philosykos - I wear Philosykos despite the fact that I consider it feminine because I quite like it).

    I thought it would be interesting to capture a snapshot of how we rate "unisex" fragrances today on a gender scale - it will almost definitely be different in the future and vary according to industry marketing and our own personal experiences.

    ... and you're right, there is no right or wrong amswer to the question. It's all opinion.
    Two points:

    First, there is somehow a distinct line that I draw between "masculine" and "feminine," while also realizing that the line is in some way arbitrary - weird how that works. Sweetness is definitely one of the top factors that makes me consider a scent to be too "feminine" for me. As soon as I get that whiff of overt sweetness, I hand it to my gf. Sweet AND floral - that's almost always "feminine" to my nose. Dryness, woods, spice, moss, earthiness, and incense I tend to see as being "masculine," unless they also have strong floral notes. Citrus and citrusy-floral notes I think of as "unisex." Herbal or green notes seem more "masculine" to me. Gourmands come across as "feminine" to me, unless they also have lots of wood, spice, or earthiness.

    Second, I agree with your theory as well. Since these things are at least partially socially constructed, it only makes sense that as the environment changes, so do the general populace's evaluations of the things that comprise it. For me, the question is how does the environment come to change? IMO, it always takes a handful of experts, creatives, or early adopters to lead the way. For example, a well-known or respected designer makes a fragrance that smells sweet and/or floral, markets it as a masculine scent, and over time it catches on. People wear it and it changes the definition of masculine because of an "expert's" opinion and design. Or some brave someone picks up a bottle of a feminine marketed scent, wears it, and starts a trend. The trend catches on, is picked up by a designer, is rolled out to the larger society, and it becomes part of the norm.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so...

    All this discussion about sweet scents makes me wonder why no one has mentioned A*Men. I don't know WHAT to think about that one. B*Men, on the other hand, is very masculine, IMO and in my lady's opinion.
    Nihil Obstat Ben


    [url=http://www.basenotes.net/wardrobe/1883]My Wardrobe[/url]

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    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so...

    Yup, it's all conditioning. *After all, fragrance, like colors for instance, have no innate gender. *I mean, we associate pink with girls, but, why? *Because we've been socially engineered from an early age to think that pink=feminine. *And the same holds true with fragrances. *Thousands upon thousands of scent associations linking particular fragrances with various people, and we just can't help but to make gender associations. *

    Anway, the only time someone's told me that I smelled like a girl while wearing a fragrance was while wearing Silver Mountain Water. *I assure you, this is not going to stop me from wearing it, as I love the stuff. *And, this came from an 18 year old high school male. *And, from my own experiences, the ladies love SMW on me. *So, I'm gonna take their feedback over his.

    Oh, and Philosykos rules, and though it may not be the "manliest" fragrance on the block, I would have no qualms about wearing it out.

    MR...totally masculine, to me anyways. *I just can't imagine this stuff on a woman. *Maybe I'll have to talk a female friend into letting me spray some on her...

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so...

    I find even B*Men to be pretty sweet, although not as cloying as A*Men. Despite it's heavy, almost sugar-y nature--I don't find A*Men to strike me as "feminine" though. Makes me wonder what in a fragrance makes it "sweet"--is it fruits, vanilla, or other edible notes?

    As to whether the default is to sweet being "feminine", what does one make of a fragrance like Guerlain Jicky? It is certainly old enough to not be included in popular fragrance trends--yet there is definitely a sweetness in the base, perhaps from the benzoin. I believe I have read of this one originally being marketed to men, while now, although classified in the basenotes directory as "unisex", I almost only ever see it on the women's counter in stores. If Sean Connery wears it, is it really going to seem all that feminine? Does this suggest that 100 yrs ago men wore sweet scents, and only recently "sweetness" has been taken over by the "feminine" fragrance market?

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    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so...

    Quote Originally Posted by docluv45
    I
    As to whether the default is to sweet being "feminine", what does one make of a fragrance like Guerlain Jicky? *It is certainly old enough to not be included in popular fragrance trends--yet there is definitely a sweetness in the base, perhaps from the benzoin. *I believe I have read of this one originally being marketed to men, while now, although classified in the basenotes directory as "unisex", I almost only ever see it on the women's counter in stores. *If Sean Connery wears it, is it really going to seem all that feminine? *Does this suggest that 100 yrs ago men wore sweet scents, and only recently "sweetness" has been taken over by the "feminine" fragrance market?
    "Does this suggest that 100 yrs ago men wore sweet scents, and only recently "sweetness" has been taken over by the "feminine" fragrance market?"'

    yes it does and we're not giving it back....... :P :P :P so there



    just had another thought about unisex fragrances.....

    A successful unisex fragrance is when men say its masculine and women think its feminine and both sexes claim it as their own and everyone feels comfortable wearing it.

    An unsuccessful unisex scent: Men think its feminine women think its masculine and no one wants to wear it A fragrance company's nightmare.......LOL

  23. #23

    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so...

    imho all the frags you've mentioned are totally unisex or better say shared in fact if you look at the box they didnt even mention gender ,the future in the world of perfumery will be that no gender will be specified so the housebrands could effectively earn much money

  24. #24

    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so...

    Quote Originally Posted by docluv45
    MM: Was wondering your take on Marc Jacobs Men, a modernist "masculine" fragrance with a prominent fig note. I agree that it is interesting to look at history and speculate on the transitions in our gender-scentsibilities over time. Is fig making a move? Time will tell.
    Hmmm... I know I tested it once a while ago, but I can't remember what I thought about it. Time to head to the mall...

    Quote Originally Posted by Buffalo_Gal
    A successful unisex fragrance is when men say its masculine and women think its feminine and both sexes claim it as their own and everyone feels comfortable wearing it.
    An unsuccessful unisex scent: Men think its feminine women think its masculine and no one wants to wear it A fragrance company's nightmare.......LOL
    Very well said. I am starting to think that this is the genius of Musc Ravageur.

    Quote Originally Posted by robyogi
    Or some brave someone picks up a bottle of a feminine marketed scent, wears it, and starts a trend. The trend catches on, is picked up by a designer, is rolled out to the larger society, and it becomes part of the norm.
    Absolutely - and IMHO basenoters are the bravest of the brave when it comes to crossing the fragrance gender line and perhaps setting new trends.
    Fragrance marketers really should watch this board (perhaps they already do?).

    Thanks for all the contributions.
    I hope it has been more interesting than wondering what is the best summer scent...

  25. #25

    Default Re: Unisex? Hmmm... I don't think so...

    Quote Originally Posted by musky_monkey
    Absolutely - and IMHO basenoters are the bravest of the brave when it comes to crossing the fragrance gender line and perhaps setting new trends.
    Fragrance marketers really should watch this board (perhaps they already do?).

    Thanks for all the contributions.
    I hope it has been more interesting than wondering what is the best summer scent...
    Yeah, I'd say B-noters have a higher percentage of fragrance early adopters or trend setters than does the general public.

    This thread has been a good one IMO - the kind that keeps me coming back to the site. Thanks!

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