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  1. #1

    Default Fragrance free zone

    What do you guys think of this? :-?

    http://www.nontoxic.com/nontoxic/fra...freeupdate.htm

    Will it ever come so far that a fragnance will be as frowned upon as smoking?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Fragrance free zone

    I wouldn't smoke during a board meeting any more than I would wear 6 squirts of A*Men. There certainly are times and places to leave the frags at home.
    -Airplane rides
    -Hospitals
    -Clinics or facilities serving people with sensitivities
    -Around animals (zoo, vet, stables)
    Nihil Obstat Ben


    My Wardrobe

  3. #3

    Default Re: Fragrance free zone

    It's a little over-the-top to make something into a law, at least IMO. And how would you enforce that? "Sir, can I sniff your chest please?" I usually either don't wear a frag or go very lightly when traveling on a plane (then again, I may rethink this considering the BO and people-stink that overtakes a plane on a cross-country flight - I'd rather smell AdG, or even Kouros, than that).

    Around animals, I have never noticed a "problem," not sure where that's coming from. Sure they sense more smells than we do, but that also means we always have a scent, even if we don't try (e.g., laundry detergent, fabric softener, deodorant, would all be very noticeable by animals). I think this is all another example/more proof of the theory that scent is frowned upon in our culture, as being inferior or more base/animalic than the other, "nobler" senses.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Fragrance free zone

    Quote Originally Posted by robyogi
    It's a little over-the-top to make something into a law, at least IMO. *And how would you enforce that? *"Sir, can I sniff your chest please?" *I usually either don't wear a frag or go very lightly when traveling on a plane (then again, I may rethink this considering the BO and people-stink that overtakes a plane on a cross-country flight - I'd rather smell AdG, or even Kouros, than that). *

    Around animals, I have never noticed a "problem," not sure where that's coming from. *Sure they sense more smells than we do, but that also means we always have a scent, even if we don't try (e.g., laundry detergent, fabric softener, deodorant, would all be very noticeable by animals). *I think this is all another example/more proof of the theory that scent is frowned upon in our culture, as being inferior or more base/animalic than the other, "nobler" senses. *

    I have to agree. It is a little rediculous to want to enforce such a thing. It just makes no sence and I think that it should never happen. Who really cares THAT much!!??

  5. #5

    Default Re: Fragrance free zone

    I don't think that there should be a law against fragrances, but I do think there are common-sense situations where they are not appropriate.

    Facilities should be able to dictate local policies, though. I'm thinking of something akin to the signs you see like "Firearms are banned within these premises."

    I can understand how it must feel to have unpleasant reactions to other people's perfume while being able to do nothing about it.
    Nihil Obstat Ben


    My Wardrobe

  6. #6

    Default Re: Fragrance free zone

    Sometimes I get the impression that at least some of the people who do this are of the "I am soooo much more delicate than you" variety. I mean, I'm allergic to cats. Like, I can't be in the room with little Fluffy and breathe without a Ventonol inhaler. However, that does not mean that I cannot be in the same room with a cat owner. I can believe that there are people who are allergic, but I can't believe that the 2 spritzes on Hadrien that I applied under my t-shirt, polo and sweater is going to cause anaphylactic shock. When the cologne goes, then the fabric softener does, the deoderant, the shampoo, any hair products, the cleaning products used by the maintenance staff, the VOC's from the carpets, the toner from the printer...

    The Jury is still out on the science behind this.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Fragrance free zone

    Quote Originally Posted by tmp
    Sometimes I get the impression that at least some of the people who do this are of the "I am soooo much more delicate than you" variety. I mean, I'm allergic to cats. Like, I can't be in the room with little Fluffy and breathe without a Ventonol inhaler. However, that does not mean that I cannot be in the same room with a cat owner. I can believe that there are people who are allergic, but I can't believe that the 2 spritzes on Hadrien that I applied under my t-shirt, polo and sweater is going to cause anaphylactic shock. When the cologne goes, then the fabric softener does, the deoderant, the shampoo, any hair products, the cleaning products used by the maintenance staff, the VOC's from the carpets, the toner from the printer...

    The Jury is still out on the science behind this.
    You'd be amazed how sensitive some people can be to certain molecules. I'll never forget the time I was playing a game of poker and a kid near me was eating some snack mix, which contained peanuts. Another kid was allergic to peanuts, but only a few of us knew and nobody really thought about the snack mix containing peanuts. About an hour and a half into the game, the kid who was allergic to the peanuts started complaining that his hands were itchy. Within a few minutes, he was breaking out in hives and having problems breathing. I had the fun experience of getting to administer his Epi-Pen. The ambulance came, but he was well enough that he didn't have to go to the hospital. Apparently just the oil from the peanuts getting on the cards was enough to trigger a reaction. I used to just think the kid was a hypochondriac, and I would have never thought that such a miniscule amount could trigger a full-on reaction. It only takes a few molecules, much the same way it only takes a few virii to infect someone.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Fragrance free zone

    Honestly, I think those people need to just die. Seriously, if a common chemical is THAT dangerous to you, you're clearly not fit to survive.

  9. #9
    Renato's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fragrance free zone

    Quote Originally Posted by greyhueofdoubt
    I wouldn't smoke during a board meeting any more than I would wear 6 squirts of A*Men. There certainly are times and places to leave the frags at home.
    -Airplane rides
    -Hospitals
    -Clinics or facilities serving people with sensitivities
    -Around animals (zoo, vet, stables)
    Quite frankly, when you have to travel for 24 hours in a plane trip from Australia to Europe, you wind up wishing that the wearing of scents was made compulsory.
    Renato

  10. #10

    Default Re: Fragrance free zone

    When flying from Europe to Australia however, there are no smells


    I understand that people have trouble with it, but then again, maybe they're offended by my clothes also. Or maybe because I wear leather shoes they're offended.
    Is it intolerant to say that the world has become intolerant?

  11. #11

    Default Re: Fragrance free zone

    Quote Originally Posted by Stuffman
    I'll never forget the time I was playing a game of poker and a kid near me was eating some snack mix, which contained peanuts.
    Peanut allergies are documented and life threatening, MCS isn't.

  12. #12
    Oviatt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fragrance free zone

    I just took my elderly mother to a doctor's appointment, a specialist she had been referred to. As soon as I made the appointment I was inundated with warnings that it was a fragrance free office, that no patients would be seen if wearing scent due to its "life threatening" effect on the doctors and staff. In their instructions they even said to wear freshly laundered or dry cleaned clothes so there would be no residual scent.

    Life threatening? Residual scent? Really?

    I mean between my mother's usual Shalimar/Bellodgia/l'Heure Bleue/Chloe and whatever I might be wearing, we could have been considered lethal weapons. Of course I made sure that we were compliant (although I itched to wear a few healthy shots of Knize Ten just to show that I could). I was freshly laundered but took off the time from work and showed up in a suit that had NOT just come from the cleaners. Luckily he is one of the best doctors of his kind or I may have voted with my feet and found another specialist. I don't mind occasionally accommodating other people's needs (I say occasionally because in this case, I was the customer and we used always to be right) but don't lie about it--has anyone actually died from perfume? Death by Chanel No. 5? I haven't heard of it before and if anyone actually had that high a level of sensitivity, they should be on disability in a bubble somewhere.
    Striving still to Truth unknown
    Currently wearing: Yatagan by Caron

  13. #13
    hednic's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fragrance free zone

    Quote Originally Posted by Oviatt View Post
    I just took my elderly mother to a doctor's appointment, a specialist she had been referred to. As soon as I made the appointment I was inundated with warnings that it was a fragrance free office, that no patients would be seen if wearing scent due to its "life threatening" effect on the doctors and staff. In their instructions they even said to wear freshly laundered or dry cleaned clothes so there would be no residual scent.

    Life threatening? Residual scent? Really?

    I mean between my mother's usual Shalimar/Bellodgia/l'Heure Bleue/Chloe and whatever I might be wearing, we could have been considered lethal weapons. Of course I made sure that we were compliant (although I itched to wear a few healthy shots of Knize Ten just to show that I could). I was freshly laundered but took off the time from work and showed up in a suit that had NOT just come from the cleaners. Luckily he is one of the best doctors of his kind or I may have voted with my feet and found another specialist. I don't mind occasionally accommodating other people's needs (I say occasionally because in this case, I was the customer and we used always to be right) but don't lie about it--has anyone actually died from perfume? Death by Chanel No. 5? I haven't heard of it before and if anyone actually had that high a level of sensitivity, they should be on disability in a bubble somewhere.
    Just posted a somewhat related topic/article I recently read in a thread in the General Fragrance Forum.
    Last edited by hednic; 16th February 2016 at 09:07 PM.
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