Code of Conduct
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1

    Default Buying fragrances - risk of them gone bad?

    Hi guys. I have a question about buying fragrances.
    How do you know if the bottle is old or not when you buy a new frag? I know a store that is close to where I live, but I'm afraid they have old stuff, like the frag has been there for a while.
    How do you know that you're buying something that hasn't gone bad?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Buying fragrances - risk of them gone bad?

    Quote Originally Posted by whoamI
    Hi guys. I have a question about buying fragrances.
    How do you know if the bottle is old or not when you buy a new frag? I know a store that is close to where I live, but I'm afraid they have old stuff, like the frag has been there for a while.
    How do you know that you're buying something that hasn't gone bad?

    [blue]whoamI,

    Welcome to the board. The short answer is that there's no real way of knowing. Even age is not an good indication. I've had a 200ml bottle of Guerlain Vetiver EDC for 18 years and even know that there's about 10ml left it's still pretty much fine.

    The two things that really deteriorate fragrances are air and light. With these factors in mind, your chances of getting a good bottle are excellent if the bottle is an atomizer as opposed to a splash bottle, but the most important factor is that the bottle is boxed. There's a lot less likelihood if it is that if will have been exposed to light and, hence, more likelihood that it's fine no matter what its age. This matter more when buying from a store which has their older bottles out in the open as opposed to e-retailers who frequently sell unboxed testers and unboxed older bottles, but have the good sense and practice to keep them well stored and away from light. Don't necessarily discount a bottle because it's not boxed, but by all means it's good practice to box your own bottles over the long haul.

    Most designer fragrances tend to last longer than niche fragrances (and even within the group of niche fragrances there is great variation. Annick Goutal fragrances for example don't last as long as most other niche fragrances. Creeds are notorious for poor quality control and deterioration. This has more to do with their crappy cheap spray mechanisms, which leak and which, by extension, let air in, than it does with Creed's "fabled" use of natural ingredients). The newer a designer and even niche fragrance is, the less likelihood that you'll will have problems with deterioration because of the use of preservatives and even light blockers like benzophenone and more modern, effective bottling technology.

    I've been buying fragrances for over 25 years now and the "bad bottle" is the exception to the rule. The one exception to that rule is Creed fragrances. Even their large "flacon" bottles leak, which means they're not air tight, so when buying Creed, caution is definitely the best policy. With designer fragrances, older Chanels have a greater tendencey to go off than most other designer fragrances. This is not the case with their newer (post 2000) formulations.

    A practical suggestion: if you're really worried about a particular store and its bottles, ask the sales assistant to let you sample first before buying. Many will let you do this, especially if they're a specialty store and don't want to lose your custom. If they don't let you test before you buy, buy the bottle, open the package in the store, and spray it right then and there in front of them. If it's "off", tell them you think the fragrance is "off" and you want a refund or at the very least an acceptable bottle. Your chances are much better if you do it right on the spot than returning a week later.

    Having said all this might make it sound like there's a potential bad bottle lurking around each corner. That usually isn't the case and most retailers will take back bad bottles, as will most e-retailers and ebayers. Basenoters will be glad to let you know who you can trust and who you can't. Don't stress too much over this and enjoy the quest as much as the arrival at your destination.

    I hope all this helps rather than overwhelms.

    Best regards,

    scentemental[/blue]

  3. #3

    Default Re: Buying fragrances - risk of them gone bad?

    Brilliant answer! I feel calmed by all this.
    Arte et labore

  4. #4

    Default Re: Buying fragrances - risk of them gone bad?

    Quote Originally Posted by viktorov
    Brilliant answer! I feel calmed by all this.
    indeed, it ought to be in the FAQ

  5. #5

    Default Re: Buying fragrances - risk of them gone bad?

    Excellent post scentemental. I appreciate the time you put into the answer, it really helped.

    One last thing, do you know anything about Hugo Boss Elements Aqua's bottles? Do they have a tendency to leak?

    Again, thx for your reply.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Buying fragrances - risk of them gone bad?

    Quote Originally Posted by whoamI
    Excellent post scentemental. I appreciate the time you put into the answer, it really helped.

    One last thing, do you know anything about Hugo Boss Elements Aqua's bottles? Do they have a tendency to leak?

    Again, thx for your reply.

    [blue]Thank you gentleman for your kind words and thanks. Sorry whoamI, I have no experience at all with Hugo Boss Elements Aqua bottles. I didn't mean to suggest, however, that leakage is a problem to consider with most fragrance houses, quite the opposite in fact. I've only found it to be a problem with Creeds because of their antiquated atomizers and their poorly designed flacon stoppers. I have about 12 Creeds in my collection. Every flacon I've had shipped to me has leaked (5 out of 5) and about half the atomizers have leaked. That can't be a coincidence. I've never had leakage problems with any other designer.

    Regards,

    scentemental[/blue]

  7. #7

    Default Re: Buying fragrances - risk of them gone bad?


    Here is a blatant exception to "the rule" of which Scentemental speaks that I would like to relate:

    I live in south FL where the temp and humidity are unbearably high much of the year (i'm get'n the hell out soon). Recently I went to a Navarro drugstore (online also) to look for a specific fragrance as they tend to have a large selection at discount prices. As I approached the building, I could see into a somewhat tinted section of their windows, boxes and boxes of various fragrances. They were storing their not-on-display stock right up against the windows. I turned around and left.

    The moral: beware of brick-n-mortar retailers (some of which sell online also) who's display cases or extra stock are in close proximity to a large window (or near bright lights). At certain times of the day, these displays may be subjected to direct sunlight and therefore heat. Unfortunately, we really have no way of knowing the storage practices of online retailers, except for those rare few that broadcast their pride in their products and customer service. Example: http://www.strawberrynet.com "Freshness is also 100% guaranteed as we keep all our stock in a temperature controlled environment prior to shipping and subject to regular quality control checks. We are highly rated by the following popular websites..." These folks are a little more expensive, but I trust them.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Buying fragrances - risk of them gone bad?

    Quote Originally Posted by MadScientist
    Here is a blatant exception to "the rule" of which Scentemental speaks that I would like to relate:

    I live in south FL where the temp and humidity are unbearably high much of the year (i'm get'n the hell out soon). Recently I went to a Navarro drugstore (online also) to look for a specific fragrance as they tend to have a large selection at discount prices. As I approached the building, I could see into a somewhat tinted section of their windows, boxes and boxes of various fragrances. They were storing their not-on-display stock right up against the windows. I turned around and left.
    I'll second that emotion... I also live in south FL and your description sounds eerily like the Navarro store in downtown Coral Gables, where the window is completely obliterated by fragrance "gift packs".

    Even worse yet, my neighborhood liquor store keeps a huge selection of their vodka next to a southwest-facing window -- they have no apparent window tinting and I've been in there when the sun is shining directly on the bottles. As is typical for south FL, nobody seems to care...

    -Ronald

Similar Threads

  1. Best Sandalwood
    By Vibrant_Violet in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 237
    Last Post: 21st June 2014, 04:03 PM
  2. Designer or Niche: A Reevaluation (very long post)
    By scentemental in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 119
    Last Post: 2nd December 2011, 03:58 PM
  3. Dec '07 Details magazine - The Ultimate Guide to Buying Cologne
    By mikeperez23 in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 23rd August 2009, 02:15 PM
  4. mega-compilation of mini-reviews
    By Leifer in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 17th January 2008, 08:01 AM
  5. Peddling Fragrances From Cars?
    By Ladylonestar in forum Female Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 24th March 2005, 03:34 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •