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  1. #1
    cedriceccentric's Avatar
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    Default The mystery of Creed's serial numbers resolved!

    Maybe this has already been posted :-/

    There is a small interview of Olivier Creed in last month's Allure.

    Allure: Does fragrance gets better with age?
    Olier Creed: Every package of Creed is stamped with the year it was created (bottled).I recommend you buy the oldest year available because the natural ingredients will have had extra time to fuse. Right now, a bottle created in 2002 is perfect.

    This explains also why one specific scent from Creed can smell diferently from one bottle to another. For example my 7 year old bottle of Santal Imperial (yes it's still good) smells much woodier, than the tester of the store I work at.

  2. #2

    Default Re: The mystery of Creed's serial numbers resolved

    Interesting... This goes against the "the fresher the better" theory most of us have believed in. This would seemed to me more appropriate for essential oils kept under ideal conditions, but for fragrances sitting there on those overly-lit shelves...
    ę L'odeur de rose, faible, gr‚ce au vent lťger d'ťtť qui passe, se mÍle aux parfums qu'elle a mis.Ľ
    [ Paul Verlaine ]
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  3. #3
    Celdor's Avatar
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    Default Re: The mystery of Creed's serial numbers resolved

    OR it could be a marketing ploy to get you to buy the old stock! Hehe! ;D
    "If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking." -Nagasawa in Norwegian Wood

  4. #4
    MadScientist's Avatar
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    Default Re: The mystery of Creed's serial numbers resolved

    Quote Originally Posted by cedriceccentric
    Maybe this has already been posted :-/

    There is a small interview of Olivier Creed in last month's Allure.

    Allure: Does fragrance gets better with age?
    Olier Creed: Every package of Creed is stamped with the year it was created (bottled).I recommend you buy the oldest year available because the natural ingredients will have had extra time to fuse. Right now, a bottle created in 2002 is perfect.

    This explains also why one specific scent from Creed can smell diferently from one bottle to another. For example my 7 year old bottle of Santal Imperial (yes it's still good) smells much woodier, than the tester of the store I work at.

    You know, this could just be a marketing ploy to "reassure" people that it's ok to buy old stock. I find it hard to believe that they could engineer a fragrance to smell good fresh and smell "better" the longer it ages. The different ingredients will have different aging characteristics. Am I to believe that they all get "better" with age? What about proper storage? I'm sure only a small fraction of retailers actually pay any attention to keeping their fragrances cool and in a low-light environment. Many display cases are lighted, and therefore heated. I have also seen display cases/counters that are flooded with sunlight at certain parts of the day - every day. How can Creed expect their stock to age properly after it has left their hands?

    If Creed controlled their distribution more like Bond No. 9, I might put a little more credence in Oli's statement.

  5. #5

    Default Re: The mystery of Creed's serial numbers resolved

    Crock!! : This company has such abysmal quality control, to say 2002 is better than 2004 is quite nonsensical on dear Ollie's part. There is tremedous variation even within the same year. Not to mention people seeing 2002 on Original Vetiver and Original Santal boxes - which doesn't make sense.
    The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.
    -- Marcel Proust

  6. #6
    MadScientist's Avatar
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    Default Re: The mystery of Creed's serial numbers resolved

    Quote Originally Posted by sentient
    Crock!! *: This company has such abysmal quality control, to say 2002 is better than 2004 is quite nonsensical on dear Ollie's part. There is tremedous variation even within the same year. Not to mention people seeing 2002 on Original Vetiver and Original Santal boxes - which doesn't make sense.
    Actually, if what Oli says is true, this is what I would expect to see. I would expect (hope) Creed to hang-on to the bottles until they had "ripened." So to see an Original Santal box NOW with the date 2002, would be a good thing.

  7. #7

    Default Re: The mystery of Creed's serial numbers resolved

    BS!
    "You can ignore reality, but you can't ignore the consequences of ignoring reality." - Ayn Rand

    "I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical...It is a medicine necessary for the sound health of government." - Thomas Jefferson

  8. #8

    Default Re: The mystery of Creed's serial numbers resolved

    Quote Originally Posted by Celdor
    OR it could be a marketing ploy to get you to buy the old stock! Hehe! *;D

    I was thinking the same myself...

  9. #9

    Default Re: The mystery of Creed's serial numbers resolved

    Quote Originally Posted by cedriceccentric
    Maybe this has already been posted :-/

    There is a small interview of Olivier Creed in last month's Allure.

    Allure: Does fragrance gets better with age?
    Olier Creed: Every package of Creed is stamped with the year it was created (bottled).I recommend you buy the oldest year available because the natural ingredients will have had extra time to fuse. Right now, a bottle created in 2002 is perfect.

    This explains also why one specific scent from Creed can smell differently from one bottle to another. For example my 7 year old bottle of Santal Imperial (yes it's still good) smells much woodier, than the tester of the store I work at.

    [blue]For anyone whoís interested, consider this an exercise in demythologizing.


    With all due respect to Olivier Creed, I'd like to hear one other respected perfumer claim that their houseís fragrances become better with age and that there are vintage years. To me, this sounds very much like self-serving BS. Anybody who has had significant experience with the blending of essential oils and other natural aromatic ingredients will tell you that a week to a month at the most is as long as it takes for essential oils to resolve into an accord. After that they are subject to diffusion and deterioration like any natural product. Of course, some ingredients diffuse and decompose more rapidly than others when mixed with other oils and ingredients. By itself for instance, patchouli will age better with time to a certain point, if keep under optimum conditions, but when patchouli is mixed with other ingredients, it is subject to quite rapid destabilization because of the chemical interaction it under goes in the presence of those other ingredients. In fact, there was an article posted about this very subject on Basenotes about a year and a half ago by a famous nose, I forget whom, about the rapid deterioration of perfume oils because of the individual volatility and idiosyncratic nature of various perfume oils when mixed with others ingredients. A fragranceís life can be extend by the addition of certain preservatives, but from all I've read and all the people I've spoken to who have worked with raw and synthetic perfume materials, perfume itself doesnít get better like wine does. The chemical processes of wineís maturing are completely different to the way a perfume or cologne changes over time.

    The reason Cedricís 7 year old Santal Imperial smells woodier than a recent tester bottle is quite simple. Itís got nothing to do with itís aging and becoming better in the way Monsieur Creed would have us believe; what Cedric is smelling is more of the basenotes, as is typical with all fragrances as they age. I am not arguing that his 7 year old Santal Imperial doesnít smell better to his nose than a new bottle. I am trying to explain the difference in terms other than those Monsieur Creed is using and how those terms are interpreted. Olivier Creed, after all has a vested interest in making us all believe there is something magical about his products. This is, of course, the golden rule in advertising. The one thing that all perfumes/colognes share in common is the diffusion and decomposition of their top notes, which by definition, chemically speaking, are more subject to diffusion and decomposition than middle and basenotes. Next to top notes, middles notes are more quickly subject to diffusion and decomposition, some quicker than others given the individual nature of such notes--there are significant differences between how herbal and spice notes diffuse and decompose as there are in terms of how florals diffuse and decompose over time, and even differences within these categories. The common denominator with all fragrances is that their basenotes remain the most stable, again because of their chemical nature; theyíre less subject to evaporation and a more stable over time because of the nature of their molecular configuration. Thatís why lemon is a top note and sandalwood is a basenote; itís Santal Imperial; why is it remarkable that what Cedric is smelling 7 years down the line, smells woodier. Folks, itís all about less volatile basenotes predominating over more volatile ones than it is about the Creedís product getting better with age because Creed is somehow special because they use natural ingredients. I welcome anyone one to try the following experiment with Eau de Rochas Pour Homme. Take a non-reactive opaque aluminum spray bottle, and fill it about a third full with *Eau de Rochas Pour Homme* allowing enough air in the bottle for the diffusion and decomposition of the top and middle notes to occur. Wait about two to three years and spray yourself with it and what you will get will be an absolutely gorgeous intense, and concentrated (because itís no longer diluted and modified by the top and middle notes) cedar, vetiver, and oakmoss accord. If you want to say Creeds age better with age, then I am afraid so do Rochas products.

    On a board ostensibly dedicated to the furthering of knowledge about fragrances, I donít understand the unquestioning willingness to immediately accept anything Monsieur Creed says as gospel by some many Basenoters. Part of his trick, incidentally, is in how little he says rather than in what he says, which leaves interpretation open for hopefuls. It seems these days that Creeds donít just come in a box; they seem to also come with a steady, daily assortment of myths and even angst that many people seem to buying into. Itís really quite absurd when you think of it. It would be salutary for us all to remember once in a while that the house of Creed, like all perfume houses, is in the business of selling products and along with those products non-tangibles like style and image. Itís advertising, pure and simple. I always take advertising with a grain of salt. I try not to explain things by what others tell me until Iíve done the research myself and come to my own conclusions. Then if my conclusions concur with those of the person who is telling me something, all the better.

    If Monsieur Creed is genuinely interested in enlightening us about the quality of his products, then perhaps he can explain why there is so much substandard Creed out there and why there is such an individual variance from bottle to bottle, and I am not talking about the natural variance given Creeds use of more natural ingredients than other houses, as they claim, which is a "cop out" if you ask me (see my point about Czech & Speake below). I am talking about inferior and mediocre bottles versus excellent bottles. Thatís the question Iíd like answered, and even if Monsieur Creed did give me an answer, I would apply a healthy dose of incredulity to it, as I usually do to anyone who is trying to sell me something. I will then make up my own mind whether I believe Monsieur Creed. Maybe I am less forgiving than most people, but I am certainly not ready to trust the integrity of someone whose own products are suspect in terms of their own integrity.

    Finally, it seems to me that Creed could really learn something about the use of natural ingredients and quality control from Czech & Speake, to mention just one house which clearly uses a large percentage of essential oils in its fragrances. Now thereís a company with product integrity. Still, though, I am not going to trust anything they tell me just because I happen to like their products.

    scentemental[/blue]

    [red]P.S. Even though I find most Creeds not to be to my liking, Santal Imperial is my favorite Creed, but what I like about it more than its muted sandalwood woodiness, is the dry, bitter, and complex citrus aura it maintains well into the drydown. I will probably really like the sandalwood woodiness when my bottles age like Cedricís and the citrus elements diffuse and decompose, but I wonít be wowed by the aged product just because itís a Creed. After all, as I have shown above, this is a process that is intrinsic to nature of fragrances than it is a special preserve of one company over another, as some would have it. Myths are oftentimes necessary, but it helps to understand that oftentimes they keep us in the dark about how things really work.[/red]



  10. #10
    Joel_Cairo's Avatar
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    Default Re: The mystery of Creed's serial numbers resolved

    Oliver Creed: "I recommend you buy the oldest bottle possible because I'd like to get my ailing merch of the shelves before it goes really bad and hurts my reputation."

  11. #11
    cedriceccentric's Avatar
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    Default Re: The mystery of Creed's serial numbers resolved

    I'm not sure :-/

    Ok, Olivier Creed is not always to be trusted...

    Somehow IMHO there must be something of interest in what he is saying.

    It's a fact that scents go bad after a while, specially topnotes.
    But in my experience, basenotes seems to become deeper and richer with time. My Vol de Nuit edt has gone bad: the topnotes are bitter, the daffodil and galbanum are really off. Though if I wait for a while, till the topnotes have evaporated, I find that the sandelwood and vanilla are stronger and more longlasting than before.

    Aftelier nose Mandy Aftel is famous for using vintage natural essences. She uses one type of sandelwood that is more than 100 years old.

    I'm sure than essences like vanilla, patchouli, amber and those made out of woods age very well; even become better and richer with time. Flowers are more fragile and less stabile. How about synthetics? That, I don't know.

    It's the same with wines some become tastier with age (even if there is point where they also turn bad), while it's better to drink others while they are still young.

  12. #12

    Default Re: The mystery of Creed's serial numbers resolved

    Quote Originally Posted by Joel_Cairo
    Oliver Creed: "I recommend you buy the oldest bottle possible because I'd like to get my ailing merch of the shelves before it goes really bad and hurts my reputation."
    touche!

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