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  1. #1
    Mad_Hatter
    Guest

    Default Green Irish Tweed

    There hasn't been a thread on it for quite while. Please give your comments.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    A very well done mediocre fragrance.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    IMO a disgusting fragrance.
    Fine fragrance is alive; it breathes, unfolds and unravels with each passing hour....

    Roja Dove

  4. #4

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    A long way from a favourite - I've tried hard to like it. I've failed.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    "Green"? "Irish"? "Tweed"?
    never heard of it

  6. #6

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed


    No comment.

  7. #7
    porkchop
    Guest

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    I find the top rather harsh, but the ambergris base is HEAVEN to my nose.

    maybe someone could recommend another frag with a similar base but different top?

  8. #8

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    I was also wondering about a GiT thread, theirs usually one every week or so.

    Personally love GiT, its the only scent I KNOW and OWN that can always catch peoples attention and get compliments, I just think do to Cool Water alot of people seem to dislike it, I just wished Davidoff never released CW.

    Tried Himalaya the other day, and will be ordering it, I liked it alot, GiT might drop to 2nd fav.
    "...but I also can't prove that mushrooms could not be intergalactic spaceships spying on us." Daniel C. Dennett

    Top 5
    1.
    Heritage 2. Antaeus3.Kouros 4. Drakkar Noir 5. Montana PDH

  9. #9

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Quote Originally Posted by rutherford_r
    I find the top rather harsh, but the ambergris base is HEAVEN to my nose.

    maybe someone could recommend another frag with a similar base but different top?
    The other Creeds will do the job, I think Himalaya's dry down is a bit close, its like a mix of GiT and MI, to my nose anway.
    "...but I also can't prove that mushrooms could not be intergalactic spaceships spying on us." Daniel C. Dennett

    Top 5
    1.
    Heritage 2. Antaeus3.Kouros 4. Drakkar Noir 5. Montana PDH

  10. #10

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    ONe of my faves.

    Constant compliment getter.

    Some compare it to Cool Water or Curve, but any similarities are very superficial. Once GIT drys down, those others pale by comparison.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    It is not my favourite frag, but I like it. Very good quality overall and gets compliments quite often.
    ę L'odeur de rose, faible, gr‚ce au vent lťger d'ťtť qui passe, se mÍle aux parfums qu'elle a mis.Ľ
    [ Paul Verlaine ]
    Wardrobe

  12. #12

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Probably THE mediocre scent for scent afficionados. Serves the same purpose as Cool Water for the parfumery challenged. It's the Green Day of scents. Probably the best scent ever if it wasn't so played out.

    On a positive note its one of those scents that if its not in your collection, or hasn't ever been.. i really don't think you can consider yourself a scent admirer. A discussion about GIT as stated above will be a timeless topic, right or wrong.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    It's a nice clean scent that garnishes a lot of compliments. Aside from that, I really don't understand why many love it so much. It's nice enough, but it doesn't blow my socks off either. I usually wear it when I have a hard time deciding on what to wear for school.

    Body chemistry has a really big impact on its longevity. When my gf wears GIT, it goes strong ALL DAY. When I wear it, I'm lucky if I can squeeze more than 4 hours out of it. I have to spray my clothes to get it to last. Sillage is good though as with many Creeds. I bought a tester bottle at scentiments for around $50. I would never pay retail because I just don't value it that much.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    I think the reason I love it so much is that I find the ambergris more pronounced in it than in any other Creed fragrance I've yet sampled. To me it smells heavenly, I could get lost in the scent, my nectar of the Gods for sure.

    It's funny how much noses differ! Some people think GIT is a well made fragrance that's just not for them. I totally get that, I feel that exact same way about Acier Aluminum. Everytime I smell it, it eminates quality and refinement, yet I would never want to wear it myself!

    Probably the best scent ever if it wasn't so played out.
    I don't have to worry about this, as I have absoulte confidence I will never encounter anyone where I live who will be wearing a Creed, and if so, the encounters will be few and far between! ;D

  15. #15

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    I just want to ask the people who speak of ambergris in Creed perfumes: are you familiar with ambergris REALLY? I'm not referring to any laughably synthetic ambergris sold by a Madini. I'm talking AMBERGRIS.
    As an Arab who was brought up in a house that has never run out of agarwood chips, agarwood oil, sandaleood besides BLUE WHALE AMBERGRIS, I only get a SLIGHT hint of ambergis in Acier Aluminium among the Creed fragrances I have tried so far. In GIT, ambergris is in nano measures to this nose--a microscopic smithereen that only helps enhance an overall accord. You gotta be GODS of noses to be able to tell it apart. I'm sorry, but to me you are just unknowingly repeating what others have been parroting. No offense intended, though.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Never smelled ambergris so I never comment on it any way shape or form. *But I do like GIT as it is a nice frag for office wear and is not offensive by any means nor all that pleasurable really. *To me it smells like nice scented money. *Like what someone said earlier...a nice mediocre scent.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    A quality fragrance that, in my opinion, is WAY OVERATED!! It does have a loyal following, so maybe my nose is just not as sharp as others. I think everyone should try it at least once to judge for themselves.

    Jim


  18. #18
    porkchop
    Guest

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Quote Originally Posted by Killer Vavoom
    I just want to ask the people who speak of ambergris in Creed perfumes: are you familiar with ambergris REALLY? I'm not referring to any laughably synthetic ambergris sold by a Madini. I'm talking AMBERGRIS.
    As an Arab who was brought up in a house that has never run out of agarwood chips, agarwood oil, sandaleood besides BLUE WHALE AMBERGRIS, I only get a SLIGHT hint of ambergis in Acier Aluminium among the Creed fragrances I have tried so far. In GIT, ambergris is in nano measures to this nose--a microscopic smithereen that only helps enhance an overall accord. You gotta be GODS of noses to be able to tell it apart. I'm sorry, but to me you are just unknowingly repeating what others have been parroting. No offense intended, though.
    "SNAAAAP!"

  19. #19

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Quote Originally Posted by Killer Vavoom
    I just want to ask the people who speak of ambergris in Creed perfumes: are you familiar with ambergris REALLY? I'm not referring to any laughably synthetic ambergris sold by a Madini. I'm talking AMBERGRIS.
    As an Arab who was brought up in a house that has never run out of agarwood chips, agarwood oil, sandaleood besides BLUE WHALE AMBERGRIS, I only get a SLIGHT hint of ambergis in Acier Aluminium among the Creed fragrances I have tried so far. In GIT, ambergris is in nano measures to this nose--a microscopic smithereen that only helps enhance an overall accord. You gotta be GODS of noses to be able to tell it apart. I'm sorry, but to me you are just unknowingly repeating what others have been parroting. No offense intended, though.
    I agree with you. I don't detect much ambergris in this.

    However, the fragrance isn't bad. I wouldn't put money down for it though - unless it was an EXTREMELY good deal; but definitely would never pay retail prices. It IS very similar to Cool Water. I've never liked CW - I've always found it very synthetic smelling - and much of these feelings have extrapolated towards GIT as well. However, there is definitely a level of quality in this scent compared to CW. This is much cleaner, much more distinct, and a lot nicer in general. I can tolerate this whereas I can't tolerate CW at all.

  20. #20
    porkchop
    Guest

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    pray tell... what does the base of GIT smell like then if not mysore sandalwood and ambergris?

  21. #21

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Quote Originally Posted by Noseorgy
    Never smelled ambergris so I never comment on it any way shape or form. *But I do like GIT as it is a nice frag for office wear and is not offensive by any means nor all that pleasurable really. *To me it smells like nice scented money. *Like what someone said earlier...a nice mediocre scent.
    I hear it smells like whale vomit.

  22. #22

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Quote Originally Posted by Joel_Cairo
    [quote author=Noseorgy link=1138301141/15#15 date=1138308845]Never smelled ambergris so I never comment on it any way shape or form. *But I do like GIT as it is a nice frag for office wear and is not offensive by any means nor all that pleasurable really. *To me it smells like nice scented money. *Like what someone said earlier...a nice mediocre scent.
    I hear it smells like whale vomit.
    [/quote]
    I haven't smelled that either...you got a sample? 8-)

  23. #23

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    "In GIT, ambergris is in nano measures to this nose--a microscopic smithereen that only helps enhance an overall accord. You gotta be GODS of noses to be able to tell it apart. I'm sorry, but to me you are just unknowingly repeating what others have been parroting. No offense intended, though. "



    My sister was at one time located on a small Island in the Prince William Sound off the Coast of Alaska. She and my brother-in-law are both biologists and she had some very close contact with whales and their vomit (I've seen her amazing photos of whales breaching extremely close to her while she was in very small open boats). She has since moved to Seattle.

    To make a long story short, I picked her up at LAX while wearing GIT a couple of years ago (this was probably about 4 hours after application), and after our initial hellos, she asked if I was aware that there was ambergris in the cologne I was wearing. Since I didn't know what it was at the time, she explained it to me.

    She liked GIT quite a bit and bought some for my brother-in-law.

  24. #24

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed


    GIT * :-/

  25. #25

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Quote Originally Posted by Killer Vavoom
    I just want to ask the people who speak of ambergris in Creed perfumes: are you familiar with ambergris REALLY? I'm not referring to any laughably synthetic ambergris sold by a Madini. I'm talking AMBERGRIS.
    As an Arab who was brought up in a house that has never run out of agarwood chips, agarwood oil, sandaleood besides BLUE WHALE AMBERGRIS, I only get a SLIGHT hint of ambergis in Acier Aluminium among the Creed fragrances I have tried so far. In GIT, ambergris is in nano measures to this nose--a microscopic smithereen that only helps enhance an overall accord. You gotta be GODS of noses to be able to tell it apart. I'm sorry, but to me you are just unknowingly repeating what others have been parroting. No offense intended, though.

    Iíll second Killer Vavoom's observations.

    I have been very fortunate to have sampled and to have had pointed out to me true ambergris in the vintage fragrances and parfum of the past when it was actually used in perfumery on a significant scale, but never on the scale some people imagine. Synthetic versions of ambergris have been around for decades and labdanum is often used to great effect to approximate the myriad qualities of ambergris, which it certainly does. Contrary to popular, misinformed, belief, ambergris has a broad spectrum scent profile depending upon the state in which it was found, how it is processed and diluted, and with what it is mixed.

    Perfumers find it almost impossible to tie their production schedules to natural ambergris because of problems with its availability and its quality. It is extremely hard to come by and also quite variable both in quality and amount. Add on top of this the various legal injunctions and complexities about obtaining it an using it these days

    http://www.basenotes.net/community/Y...num=1130114496


    and you have yourself a production nightmare.


    But I digress somewhat. When I was traveling in Egypt (in the early 1990s), I was fortunate enough to have been introduced to a friend of a friend who allowed me to sample various ambergris tinctures that he had. This friend of a friend was in the business of supplying essential oils and aromachemicals to French perfume houses. I got to go to his factory and see the production of refinement of various essential oils and aromachemicals and at the time he made it quite clear that natural ambergris was no longer used in modern perfumery for many of the reasons given above. I have also sampled ambergris tincture mixed with various other perfume oils in my travels in France and Italy in the late 1980s, so like KV I have an experiential basis on which to speak. On the basis of that, I do not detect natural ambergris in Creeds. If there is any in *Green Irish Tweed*--can't say I can pick it up--I would hazard to suggest that it's more than likely an aroma-chemical approximation of ambergris, certainly a very good one at that. Let me be clear, this is not to denigrate the fact that it is an enjoyable basenote for many people. Thatís not my point. I am making a point about natural ambergris.

    I will go on record and say that most Creeds, and especially new Creeds of the last twenty to thirty years are creations of the wonders of natural and modern aromachemical science combined despite the ambiguous claims of Creed to the contrary. Sometimes, they are excellent creations. I happen to like some of them. Some are a little more natural than others, some a lot more than others, particularly the Vintage Creeds, even when reformulated, some of the newer ones like *Original Santal* are no different in the aromachemical constituents of their composition than many contemporary designer scents.

    To illustrate my point: on the tester box of my bottle of the *Original Santal* bottle I own, the following constituents are listed:

    Limonene, hydroxyisophexyl, 3-cyclohexenecarboxaldehyde, coumarin, linalol, citronelol, alpha-siomethylionone, farnesol, geraniol, citral, cinnamal, methyl 2-octynoate-eugenol.

    These are some of the constituents which the EC now requires perfume houses to list as a safety precaution. Of course, my bottle of Creed could be a fake, right?


    Quote Originally Posted by rutherford_r
    pray tell... what does the base of GIT smell like then if not mysore sandalwood and ambergris?
    With all due respect, there are a huge number of assumptions in this question rutherford_r. If youíre asking the question of KV, I am assuming you know clearly what Mysore Sandalwood and ambergris smell like. Would you care to describe the smell of those? Saying that they smell like the basenotes of GIT wonít do. If you think my tone is a little harsh, and I am a little pissed off at many people for taking things at face value, youíd be right about that. Also, I happen to respect KVís knowledge and experience of fragrances and fragrant materials. This is clearly evident from his posts. I have learned a lot from them; I canít say that about most people who wax lyrically about Creeds; they tend to sound, as KV rightly pointed out, like they're parroting things at face value. If he says heís been fortunate enough to have experienced true ambergris all of his life and that as far as heís concerned there's very little of in GIT, on none in most Creeds, then I am inclined to believe him. I am less inclined to believe Creed on the basis of faith and goodwill for the reasons stated above. Besides, I don't buy into all that purveyors to royalty BS. That stuff doesn't impress me in the least. What impresses me more is that Creed has now licensed KMart to sell Silver Mountain Water.

    Iíve already made my point about ambergris so let me move on to ďMysore sandalwoodĒ.

    First of all, youíre assuming if Creed says thereís Mysore Sandalwood in GIT, that itís actually real Mysore Sandalwood. Not necessarily. Mysore sandalwood functions as a status buzz word and, also, in many cases as a descriptive term for any sandalwood oil used, even those created in the lab, which is incidentally where most sandalwood notes used in modern perfumery are created. Itís like putting out a wine and claiming itís a Bordeaux because it approximates a Bordeaux. With wines you canít do that because they're regulated by international law and names are trademarked and trademark names are enforced. Itís not the same with essential oils. Anyone can claim they are using Mysore Sandalwood essential oil. There is no regulation, no legislation to stop them from doing so. When a company gives the fragrances notes, theyíre not actually obliged by law or any other stricture to have the corresponding essential oils in the fragrance. In many cases, notes are not what are actually contained in the fragrance for which they are listed. See my post in the following thread:

    http://www.basenotes.net/community/Y...35187860/10#10


    Back to Mysore Sandalwood Oil. Even the oil thatís sold as Mysore sandalwood oil by essential oil retailers isnít Mysore sandalwood in 99.9% of cases. Ask them for their provenance report next time you try to buy some and see the reaction you get. A provenance report certifies that it came from a particular place and details and certifies the production procedure and in the case of true Mysore sandalwood would have to be certified by the Indian government. Most sandalwood that goes by ďMysore sandalwoodĒ these days comes from other areas of the state of Karnataka, and from East India also

    http://kstdc.nic.in/frames8.htm

    and most other sandalwoods of inferior nature from south East Asia. True Mysore Sandalwood only comes from a certain forested area in Mysore in the state of Karnataka. Itís production is extremely limited of necessity because the forest is in danger of being over forested to the point of a regrowth crisis. It takes up to thirty years of growth before a Mysore sandalwood tree can be harvested for oil production, with one hundred years being the optimal age. Mysore sandalwood is protected by the Indian government and most of it that is allowed by the Indian government to leave the country goes mostly to the Middle East and to private buyer/aficionados of perfume oils who can afford to pay top dollar for it. And I mean top dollar. It is prohibitively expensive for the use in modern perfumery, and I very much doubt that the sandalwood in GIT is true Mysore Sandalwood from Mysore. Iíve had true Mysore sandalwood oil in my possession in the past, so I know what it smells like, and let me assure you, it does not even remotely smell like the sandalwood note in GIT, even allowing for the blending with other elements.

    Furthermore, a straightforward calculation of the math would show you that itís prohibitive to use Mysore sandalwood in terms of cost. When you can buy a 16.9 oz bottle of GIT for about $200.00 retail, you know there isnít a drop of Mysore sandalwood in that bottle. I donít know the profit margins on a $200.00 dollar bottle, but there would be at least a 300% to 400% mark up for the wholesaler. Even the price that wholesalers buy such a bottle wouldnít pay for the price of the Mysore sandalwood oil in it. A 1/2 oz of top quality East Indian sandalwood oil costs about $50.00, it's hard to know what true Mysore sandalwood oil costs because it's almost impossible to buy, but I'll guarantee you it cost at least 2 to 3 times more than the Tamil sandalwood oil listed in the link below:

    http://www.naturesgift.com/essential...htm#SANDALWOOD

    I remember when this website had what it claimed was true Mysore sandalwood, they only sold it in 2ml decants and I am pretty sure it went for about around $20.00 for 2ml.

    I know for a fact that the GIT testers that someone like scentiments.com sells for $50.00 can be purchased by those with a reseller's license for at least $37.00. I am sure that Scentiments.com gets them a lot cheaper than that. Imagine what the wholesaler pays for them, and them imagine what it actually costs Creed to make a bottle of the stuff. Real Mysore sandalwood, give me a break.

    As noted above, I have Creedís *Original Santal*, and Iíll guarantee you anything, if I know anything about sandalwood oil--and I know a lot about it since I been fortunate enough to have had many Indian friends all my life both in Australia and the US who have always brought me back all kinds of sandalwood oils from India when they went back home for vacation--there isnít a drop of natural essential sandalwood oil in the whole bottle, I could be wrong, terribly wrong, but Iíll ask confirmation on that point from our resident sandalwood expert, Vibrant_Violet.

    Check out his thread on sandalwood:

    http://www.basenotes.net/community/Y...num=1135193994

    Every time he posts and every time KV posts, I learn something. I am grateful for that.

    scentemental



  26. #26

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    All I can say is WOW

    Nice write up scentemental makes total sense!

    Whatever it is in GIT it's quality and I like it. For me thats all that matters. However I will say that I liked thinking real ambergris or real mysore sandalwood or something expensive was in it to justify the price. :-/

    Still love the stuff tho!

  27. #27

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Thanks Mobert.

    You know, you say that you like to think that there's real ambergris and Mysore Sandalwood in GIT to justify the price, but why don't we say that about Chanels or a whole bunch of other brands that actually cost more than Creeds.

    Look, if a scentiments.com tester of GIT costs $55.00 (shipped), your cost per ml is 55/120 = approx. 46 cents a ml. I dare anyone to find a fresh tester bottle of Chanel Antaeus, for example, for less than $55.00. Cost per ml 55 cents. That's 20% more expensive than the GIT. Why don't people talk about how expensive Chanels are or how they wished Chanels had natural oils to justify the cost.

    As for availability/exclusivity, you'll never find new, fresh bottles of Chanels peppered all over the internet and e-retailers at discounted prices the way you find Creed. If you want to buy fresh new Chanels, particularly the classic fragrances, you can only do it through authorized Chanel dealers. Even Nordstroms and Saks on their websites redirect you to the Chanel website when you go to purchase a Chanel. I hate to keep repeating myself, but even Kmart now sells Creed. That's not exclusivity. That's cynicism. On the one hand, Creed sets itself up as a quaint, old-fashioned purveyor of fragrances to royalty with high standards when it comes to the use of natural ingredients, on the other hand it floods, or allows all kind of markets to be flooded with discounted Creeds and contracts with KMart to sells its products. Why are so many people buying into the myth that it's not anything else but a business and a cynical one at that. Why is the Creed myth/mystique so attractive despite all these apparent contradictions. By all means buy the fragrances, enjoy the fragrances, but don't buy the hype wholesale. After all it's Creed; you can always get it at a discount.

    That's all I am trying to do. I am just trying to bring Creed's over inflated value down to a more realisitic level.

    scentemental


  28. #28

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Number one, so far; but may drop down to 2nd place as I have start wearing Himalaya

  29. #29

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    The musk, civet and ambergris used in our fragrances are all entirely synthetic. There are no banned or restricted natural substances used in any Amouage product.

    Then why so expensive? I've wanted to try Amouage, and they tought the most valuable perfume in the World, and talk about all these ingredients and then add this disclaimer.

    I think I still want to try it though; especially the Dia


  30. #30

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Quote Originally Posted by goldslinger
    The musk, civet and ambergris used in our fragrances are all entirely synthetic. There are no banned or restricted natural substances used in any Amouage product.

    Then why so expensive? I've wanted to try Amouage, and they tought the most valuable perfume in the World, and talk about all these ingredients and then add this disclaimer.

    I think I still want to try it though; especially the Dia

    The answer to your question Goldslinger, is in part that it's not cheap to manufacturer high quality synthetic equivalents to natural occuring subsantances, particularly animal by-products, which chemically speaking tend to be extremely complex. The Creed myth rests on the idea that natural is better. In some cases it is, in many cases it's not, and certainly none of the giants works of modern perfumery are composed entirely of essential oils. What makes two of Chanel's giants--No. 5 and Bois des Illes---so unique and definitive as instances of modern perfumery is that they employ aldehydes, synthetically produced chemicals which highten the tone of top and heart notes and add a clarity and duration, not to mention a strangeness to women's perfumes that makes them so distinctive and memorable. There have been very few women's perfumes of the 80-90 years since the creation of these two mastepiences that haven't in one way or another employed aldehydes or other synthetics to give them distinctivenes, dimensionality, depth, and duration. Incidentally, aldehydes also occur in nature. Chanel No. 5 is I believe the all-time world's best selling women's perfume for about 80 years now. Some much for natural.

    Back to Amouage; it also does use top quality natural products; it has some of the world's most respected noses creating their products, and it packages the juice in expensive quartz bottles which have real and aesthetic value. They're not your cheap-arse generic Creed bottles tarted up with some gaudy gold and silver paint. Sorry, couldn't resist another dig at the idol. ;D You're also buying into an Arabian tradition of perfumery which is unique and established. This is pretty much were the value is added.

    Your point about top-end fragrances being up front with their use of synthetics is well taken. Again, to reiterate and condense: synthetics and cheap can be a false dichotomy.


    scentemental



  31. #31

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Quote Originally Posted by Crononaut
    I have absoulte confidence I will never encounter anyone where I live who will be wearing a Creed, and if so, the encounters will be few and far between! ;D
    Same here...

    Soon after discovering BN I made some blind orders...slim pickin's locally. GIT was the first to arrive. I'd never worn a quality fragrance, and GIT was pretty weird when I first put it on. About the third time I used it, I began to appreciate how it smelled after a couple hours and I have since become quite fond of it.

    It's interesting to know which scents make up a fragrance and how they go together. Thanks to Killer Vavoom and Scentemental for making some studious observations; they make pretty good sense to me. I, too, am more interested in facts than speculation, rumor, and aromatic urban legends. In the end, though, it shouldn't be brand name or ingredients or exclusivity of vendor that makes you like a fragrance, it should be how the fragrance smells.

    I really like GIT; it smells good to my uneducated and ill-mannered nose and I feel good wearing it. I don't care which famous person wore it, where it is sold, or if it is primarily comprised of rancid pork byproducts.

    I love reading the posts on this board and I can't believe how much there is to know about per d'fume.

    One thing, though, what is "BLUE WHALE AMBERGRIS?" Isn't ambergris created in the stomachs of sperm whales, presumably to protect their guts from the sharp beaks of their primary diet: squid? Blue whales have no teeth, subsist almost exclusively on tiny krill, and can't eat squid. What gives?

  32. #32

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Thanks for the education and time for answering my Post.

    What would you recommend for Daytime wear in the Amouage line? I am married and don't go out clubbing, etc. in the evening.

  33. #33

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Quote Originally Posted by goldslinger
    Thanks for the education and time for answering my Post.

    What would you recommend for Daytime wear in the Amouage line? I am married and don't go out clubbing, etc. in the evening.

    You're more than welcome goldslinger.

    I don't know that I am the best person to be recommending Amouage. I've only tested most of them through samples, which I don't believe gives one the best perspective. However, recently, I was very fortunate to have conduct a swap with Setamp, who put me onto Amouage Gold Cologne, which I like very much. This is how I described it to him:

    I sampled the Amouage Gold Cologne and I like it a lot. It reminds me very much of facets of Chanel No. 19 and Chanel Pour Monsieur [the classic one, not the concentree). I am not sure if Guy Robert is any relation to Henri Robert (I think they might be father and son) who created both the Chanels I mentioned, but he's intimately familiar with them as Amouage Gold clearly shows. It's got the assurance of old money. A really beautiful, balanced scent with an amazingly assured and steady development and output.
    There are many people here who know a lot more about Amouage than I do, and if you search the last year of posts under Amouage, you'll find some great analysis of the various scents along with advice about how to get samples of most of their range. Apparently Amouage is very obliging about sending samples.

    I hope this helps a little.

    Best regards,

    scentemental

  34. #34

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    I own Dia and Amouage considers this their more casual, daytime cologne.

    I don't think so! This is pretty sophisticated and classy stuff, but not quite as stuffy as Gold. I only use it for night and formal affairs.

    Their new one, Arcus, which I have a sample of is a pretty sophisticated take on marine scents. This could be their go-to daytime, casual acent.

    Hey wait, weren't we talking about how overrated GIT was?


  35. #35

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    If I misused ambergris (and I probably did) scentemental, I apologize; I certainly meant no offense. A few weeks ago I was trying to describe what I was smelling in GIT, and, knowing about the rave reviews ambergris was receiving on Basenotes, ventured a guess that the note I loved in it (which to me smells like just stepping out of a shower) was the ambergris, which someone confirmed for me. Since then, I've just assumed that's what it was, never stopping to think that other people could be just as misinformed as I am. Thanks for clearing it up with your in-depth information, I find it annoying too when someone misuses a term, especially if it's me.
    Since you seem to be extremely knowledgeable about notes, however, perhaps you can tell me what that shower note I'm smelling is? I'd really like to know it!

  36. #36

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Quote Originally Posted by Crononaut
    If I misused ambergris (and I probably did) scentemental, I apologize; I certainly meant no offense. A few weeks ago I was trying to describe what I was smelling in GIT, and, knowing about the rave reviews ambergris was receiving on Basenotes, ventured a guess that the note I loved in it (which to me smells like just stepping out of a shower) was the ambergris, which someone confirmed for me. Since then, I've just assumed that's what it was, never stopping to think that other people could be just as misinformed as I am. Thanks for clearing it up with your in-depth information, I find it annoying too when someone misuses a term, especially if it's me.
    Since you seem to be extremely knowledgeable about notes, however, perhaps you can tell me what that shower note I'm smelling is? I'd really like to know it!

    No problem Crononaut. I really hope I didn't come across as a cranky old school teacher scolding everyone about getting their definitions wrong. My critique is not aimed at anyone in particular and certainly nobody need apologize to me of all people for anything.

    At any rate, about the shower note. I think everybody has their own shower note. Let me explain what I mean. Today I wore Caron's Yatagan. When I asked my wife if she liked what I was wearing, she said something to the effect of "Yes it smells great, just like you stepped out of the shower". Now I know that there are many who consider Yatagan the last fragrance on earth one would describe as a fresh clean shower note like fragrance, but there you go.

    I think it's partly personal--certain things remind one of cleanliness--for some it might be florals for others aquatic notes. I can tell you one thing for sure. Nothing with a high aromatic component like spices or certain herbs will illicit a fresh shower-like feel from anyone one. GIT is--when it dries down--a very smooth, clean, uncluttered fragrance; maybe, for you, that's what reminds you of the uncluttered sense of stepping out of the shower. Sorry, but that's about the best I can do. I'll try wearing some GIT sometime soon and see if I can come up with something better.

    Best regards,

    scentemental


  37. #37

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed


    I think 2 things make creed different from many other fragrances:

    Many of their fragrances display a common *'house note'. *Despite what many seem to think, it is not ambergris but rather a proprietary blend of vanilla, ambergris and other ingredients both natural and synthetic. (think of the idea behind guerlinade from guerlain).

    Secondly, their production process still uses techniques of maceration, filtration and (I believe) enfleurage which is not common today for cost & efficiency reasons.

    Taken together, this results in an easily recognizable (some would say distinctive) fragrance. I own almost all of the creed scents. *I have my favorites and some are certainly less original than others but I don't confuse my likes and dislikes with the hype that many distributors play up. *What I would say to basenoters is just trust your nose and keep an open mind.



    AZTEC

  38. #38

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    I must say that I'm surprised at all the negativity against GIT. I think if we replay this post 4 months from now when everyone is retiring their spicy, oriental, dark, incensey, woody bottles and pulling out the lighter and brighter frags - it would be a different tune entirely. Boring, overrated, ho-hum? Are you guys really talking about Green Irish Tweed? Maybe compared to some other masterpieces out there is it rather simple, but it is no less a masterpiece. I (and I think a lot of other people) find elegance in its simplicity. Richness without overpowering. Think GIT is boring or overplayed? Tell me - what fragance category can you place it in? Citrus - not particularly. Floral - maybe a little. Green - eh, kinda. Woody - sorta. What is the season for GIT? Is it a summer frag? Well, yes. Fall? Sure. Spring? (you get it). GIT is really quite versatile, beautiful, masculine and unique, despite the incessant comparison to Walmart's top sells (CW and Curve).

    I won't put words into anyone elses mouth, but I know I have heard dozens of people on BN say that the first whiff of GIT knocked their socks off. I just couldn't let this post go on with just a sprinkling of positive comments. GIT is one of the greats and a true work of art.

  39. #39

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    I agree FatTony. I'd also line to talk about the GIT - CoolWater connection. I've tried them both side by side. GIT on one wrist and CW on the other. Side by side they are NOTHING alike. When I first smelled GIT I didn't see a connection at all. After the GIT drydown I could see the connection a bit. Best I can see a link is GIT when it drys down may smell a bit (small bit) like cool water before it drys down, but then again it's like comparing getting on the highway with a Chevy to a Benz they both may do 0-60 about the same but you'd rather be in the benz for the long trip

  40. #40

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Scentemental, your extensive knowledge in perfume is an established fact and has always wowed me, but what fascinates me equally too is the patience and tact you have in providing ever illuminating and helpful information.

  41. #41

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Some great posts on this thread, especially from scentemental. I wouldn't visit this place half as much as I do if I didn't keep learning something new.

    I like GIT very much. It's not my favourite, but it is very versatile and easy to wear. It's a 'comfort' fragrance, like a favourite sweater or a trusty pair of shoes.

    I can't speak of its composition but, like many Creeds, it certainly doesn't smell 'synthetic'. Whether that's down to the use of natural ingredients, or expert blending of artificial ones, doesn't really matter to me.

  42. #42

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    I just swapped this. I loved it for a long time, but finally grew tired of it. I always thought it would be the one scent I would always have.

    That said, it's my favorite scent of all time, I just need a break for a few years.

    I swapped it for New Tabarome. My summer Creeds will be Imperial, OV and SMW. Himalaya is a year 'rounder. My son loved Tabarome on me a few years ago.

    I received more compliments on GIT than anything else. You can grow sick of anything.

  43. #43

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Refering to my post earlier in this thread, I emailed my sister last night, and she confirmed that she has no problem detecting Ambergis in GIT.

    To reiterate, she lived in Alaska and had very close contact with whales and their vomit.

  44. #44

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Refering to my post earlier in this thread, I emailed my sister last night, and she confirmed that she has no problem detecting Ambergis in GIT.
    But, can she tell the difference between ambergris and the synthetic material called ambroxan?

    Also, I am not sure how close the smell of ambergris is to fresh whale vomit. Ambergris after all is a specific component that has spent considerable time aging in the ocean.
    All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

  45. #45

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    A sweet, but earthy smell is what was described to me; if that's it, then my 'untrained' nose detects it in GIT after a couple of hours or so.

    After my purchase of GIT, it made me want to throw out all of my Drug Store Colognes, on the first wearing. *The only thing I like more, now, is Himalaya.

    THERE IS A DIFFERENCE, and I think most would agree that it is worth the money.
    Bubble Gum popping youths might like something more single notey and smells like pez or something.

    I've got a bottle of Clive Christian's 1872, but don't like it as much as Vintage Tabarome, for my heavier scent catagory.

    I think that, for the most part, is that GIT gets so much attention here, that it kinda grates on the nerves of some that don't like it at all; hearing about it all the time.

    Some, might even think that it is an insult to their intelligence that so many like it and they don't; like they are somehow 'enlightened' and the rest are fools.

    If GIT was 20.00 a bottle, I would still like it, but confess that I probably wouldn't appreciate it as much, which also leads me to believe that some that Do like it, do so because it 'Has to Be Good; it's expensive,' kinda of logic.


    But; overall, it is a well crafted scent from a Family run company with a looooong history, using fine ingredients.

    You either like it; or you don't, but please, don't call it overpriced Junk.
    It deserves better than that.

  46. #46

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Quote Originally Posted by goldslinger


    You either like it; or you don't, but please, don't call it overpriced Junk.
    You don't know how much I agree with this statement!

    The same goes for people stating that a cologne is "overrated".

    Both statements are subtle (or maybe not so subtle) ways of insulting those that like the scent, intentional or not.

    That would be like me saying that maybe those that don't like a particular scent just don't have a sophisticated enough sense of smell to appreciate it.

  47. #47
    porkchop
    Guest

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Quote Originally Posted by scentemental
    [quote author=Killer Vavoom link=1138301141/0#14 date=1138308284]I just want to ask the people who speak of ambergris in Creed perfumes: are you familiar with ambergris REALLY? I'm not referring to any laughably synthetic ambergris sold by a Madini. I'm talking AMBERGRIS.
    As an Arab who was brought up in a house that has never run out of agarwood chips, agarwood oil, sandaleood besides BLUE WHALE AMBERGRIS, I only get a SLIGHT hint of ambergis in Acier Aluminium among the Creed fragrances I have tried so far. In GIT, ambergris is in nano measures to this nose--a microscopic smithereen that only helps enhance an overall accord. You gotta be GODS of noses to be able to tell it apart. I'm sorry, but to me you are just unknowingly repeating what others have been parroting. No offense intended, though.





    Iíll second Killer Vavoom's observations.

    I have been very fortunate to have sampled and to have had pointed out to me true ambergris in the vintage fragrances and parfum of the past when it was actually used in perfumery on a significant scale, but never on the scale some people imagine. Synthetic versions of ambergris have been around for decades and labdanum is often used to great effect to approximate the myriad qualities of ambergris, which it certainly does. Contrary to popular, misinformed, belief, ambergris has a broad spectrum scent profile depending upon the state in which it was found, how it is processed and diluted, and with what it is mixed.

    Perfumers find it almost impossible to tie their production schedules to natural ambergris because of problems with its availability and its quality. It is extremely hard to come by and also quite variable both in quality and amount. Add on top of this the various legal injunctions and complexities about obtaining it an using it these days

    http://www.basenotes.net/community/Y...num=1130114496


    and you have yourself a production nightmare.


    But I digress somewhat. When I was traveling in Egypt (in the early 1990s), I was fortunate enough to have been introduced to a friend of a friend who allowed me to sample various ambergris tinctures that he had. This friend of a friend was in the business of supplying essential oils and aromachemicals to French perfume houses. I got to go to his factory and see the production of refinement of various essential oils and aromachemicals and at the time he made it quite clear that natural ambergris was no longer used in modern perfumery for many of the reasons given above. I have also sampled ambergris tincture mixed with various other perfume oils in my travels in France and Italy in the late 1980s, so like KV I have an experiential basis on which to speak. On the basis of that, I do not detect natural ambergris in Creeds. If there is any in *Green Irish Tweed*--can't say I can pick it up--I would hazard to suggest that it's more than likely an aroma-chemical approximation of ambergris, certainly a very good one at that. Let me be clear, this is not to denigrate the fact that it is an enjoyable basenote for many people. Thatís not my point. I am making a point about natural ambergris.

    I will go on record and say that most Creeds, and especially new Creeds of the last twenty to thirty years are creations of the wonders of natural and modern aromachemical science combined despite the ambiguous claims of Creed to the contrary. Sometimes, they are excellent creations. I happen to like some of them. Some are a little more natural than others, some a lot more than others, particularly the Vintage Creeds, even when reformulated, some of the newer ones like *Original Santal* are no different in the aromachemical constituents of their composition than many contemporary designer scents.

    To illustrate my point: on the tester box of my bottle of the *Original Santal* bottle I own, the following constituents are listed:

    Limonene, hydroxyisophexyl, 3-cyclohexenecarboxaldehyde, coumarin, linalol, citronelol, alpha-siomethylionone, farnesol, geraniol, citral, cinnamal, methyl 2-octynoate-eugenol.

    These are some of the constituents which the EC now requires perfume houses to list as a safety precaution. Of course, my bottle of Creed could be a fake, right?


    Quote Originally Posted by rutherford_r
    pray tell... what does the base of GIT smell like then if not mysore sandalwood and ambergris?
    With all due respect, there are a huge number of assumptions in this question rutherford_r. If youíre asking the question of KV, I am assuming you know clearly what Mysore Sandalwood and ambergris smell like. Would you care to describe the smell of those? Saying that they smell like the basenotes of GIT wonít do. If you think my tone is a little harsh, and I am a little pissed off at many people for taking things at face value, youíd be right about that. Also, I happen to respect KVís knowledge and experience of fragrances and fragrant materials. This is clearly evident from his posts. I have learned a lot from them; I canít say that about most people who wax lyrically about Creeds; they tend to sound, as KV rightly pointed out, like they're parroting things at face value. If he says heís been fortunate enough to have experienced true ambergris all of his life and that as far as heís concerned there's very little of in GIT, on none in most Creeds, then I am inclined to believe him. I am less inclined to believe Creed on the basis of faith and goodwill for the reasons stated above. Besides, I don't buy into all that purveyors to royalty BS. That stuff doesn't impress me in the least. What impresses me more is that Creed has now licensed KMart to sell Silver Mountain Water.

    Iíve already made my point about ambergris so let me move on to ďMysore sandalwoodĒ.

    First of all, youíre assuming if Creed says thereís Mysore Sandalwood in GIT, that itís actually real Mysore Sandalwood. Not necessarily. Mysore sandalwood functions as a status buzz word and, also, in many cases as a descriptive term for any sandalwood oil used, even those created in the lab, which is incidentally where most sandalwood notes used in modern perfumery are created. Itís like putting out a wine and claiming itís a Bordeaux because it approximates a Bordeaux. With wines you canít do that because they're regulated by international law and names are trademarked and trademark names are enforced. Itís not the same with essential oils. Anyone can claim they are using Mysore Sandalwood essential oil. There is no regulation, no legislation to stop them from doing so. When a company gives the fragrances notes, theyíre not actually obliged by law or any other stricture to have the corresponding essential oils in the fragrance. In many cases, notes are not what are actually contained in the fragrance for which they are listed. See my post in the following thread:

    http://www.basenotes.net/community/Y...35187860/10#10


    Back to Mysore Sandalwood Oil. Even the oil thatís sold as Mysore sandalwood oil by essential oil retailers isnít Mysore sandalwood in 99.9% of cases. Ask them for their provenance report next time you try to buy some and see the reaction you get. A provenance report certifies that it came from a particular place and details and certifies the production procedure and in the case of true Mysore sandalwood would have to be certified by the Indian government. Most sandalwood that goes by ďMysore sandalwoodĒ these days comes from other areas of the state of Karnataka, and from East India also

    http://kstdc.nic.in/frames8.htm

    and most other sandalwoods of inferior nature from south East Asia. True Mysore Sandalwood only comes from a certain forested area in Mysore in the state of Karnataka. Itís production is extremely limited of necessity because the forest is in danger of being over forested to the point of *a regrowth crisis. It takes up to thirty years of growth before a Mysore sandalwood tree can be harvested for oil production, with one hundred years being the optimal age. Mysore sandalwood is protected by the Indian government and most of it that is allowed by the Indian government to leave the country goes mostly to the Middle East and to private buyer/aficionados of perfume oils who can afford to pay top dollar for it. And I mean top dollar. It is prohibitively expensive for the use in modern perfumery, and I very much doubt that the sandalwood in GIT is true Mysore Sandalwood from Mysore. Iíve had true Mysore sandalwood oil in my possession in the past, so I know what it smells like, and let me assure you, it does not even remotely smell like the sandalwood note in GIT, even allowing for the blending with other elements.

    Furthermore, a straightforward calculation of the math would show you that itís prohibitive to use Mysore sandalwood in terms of cost. When you can buy a 16.9 oz bottle of GIT for about $200.00 retail, you know there isnít a drop of Mysore sandalwood in that bottle. I donít know the profit margins on a $200.00 dollar bottle, but there would be at least a 300% to 400% mark up for the wholesaler. Even the price that wholesalers buy such a bottle wouldnít pay for the price of the Mysore sandalwood oil in it. A 1/2 oz of top quality East Indian sandalwood oil costs about $50.00, it's hard to know what true Mysore sandalwood oil costs because it's almost impossible to buy, but I'll guarantee you it cost at least 2 to 3 times more than the Tamil sandalwood oil listed in the link below:

    http://www.naturesgift.com/essential...htm#SANDALWOOD

    I remember when this website had what it claimed was true Mysore sandalwood, they only sold it in 2ml decants and I am pretty sure it went for about around $20.00 for 2ml.

    I know for a fact that the GIT testers that someone like scentiments.com sells for $50.00 can be purchased by those with a reseller's license for at least $37.00. I am sure that Scentiments.com gets them a lot cheaper than that. Imagine what the wholesaler pays for them, and them imagine what it actually costs Creed to make a bottle of the stuff. Real Mysore sandalwood, give me a break.

    As noted above, I have Creedís *Original Santal*, and Iíll guarantee you anything, if I know anything about sandalwood oil--and I know a lot about it since I been fortunate enough to have had many Indian friends all my life both in Australia and the US who have always brought me back all kinds of sandalwood oils from India when they went back home for vacation--there isnít a drop of natural essential sandalwood oil in the whole bottle, I could be wrong, terribly wrong, but Iíll ask confirmation on that point from our resident sandalwood expert, Vibrant_Violet.

    Check out his thread on sandalwood:

    http://www.basenotes.net/community/Y...num=1135193994

    Every time he posts and every time KV posts, I learn something. I am grateful for that.

    scentemental


    [/quote]


    WOW. and still no answer to the simple question: what does the base of GIT smell like then if not mysore sandalwood and ambergris?

  48. #48

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    You know what is funny about all this, that even people who purportedly DON'T like GIT keep talking about it... and meanwhile this thread keeps growing... Kinda humorous in a good sense.
    ę L'odeur de rose, faible, gr‚ce au vent lťger d'ťtť qui passe, se mÍle aux parfums qu'elle a mis.Ľ
    [ Paul Verlaine ]
    Wardrobe

  49. #49

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    I knew this was gonna be a 'juicy' thread

  50. #50
    porkchop
    Guest

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Post edited by Moderator:

    Posting private messages are strictly prohibited by Basenotes TOS. If the TOS are unclear, feel free to PM any of the moderators and we can make it more clear.

  51. #51

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    ę L'odeur de rose, faible, gr‚ce au vent lťger d'ťtť qui passe, se mÍle aux parfums qu'elle a mis.Ľ
    [ Paul Verlaine ]
    Wardrobe

  52. #52

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Quote Originally Posted by Scentemental
    [quote author=porkchop link=action=imshow;caller=1;id=1138395507 date=1138395506].....
    ...arse...[/quote]

    ;D *ROTFLMArseO

  53. #53

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Can't believe it!!!

    WOW..

    He actually took the time to count how many frags you have! lol ;D

  54. #54

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    That's a pretty intense post!

    But in the NBA there are many times a player will hit another player and that player will retaliate. Usually the player that retaliates gets called for a foul, not the instigator.

    I'd like to see what led up to that post, not that I'm trying to justify it.

  55. #55

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    I'm not locking this yet, but if anyone throws insults out again or violates any TOS, the thread will be locked. Keep it on topic or it will be locked.

  56. #56

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    My hats off to Scentemental and a few others for taking the time to educate and type tirelessly, in their own words, instead of cutting and pasting.

    I always enjoy a great debate and learn alot!

  57. #57

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Very interesting!! A very entertaining, but more importantly....INSIGHTFUL (Incite-ful? LOL) thread!!


    If I keep reading, I may have to just plonk down some cash and get me a bottle!!





    Where's Serpent when you want fuel added to the fire?? LOL!!



  58. #58

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny Wx

    One thing, though, what is "BLUE WHALE AMBERGRIS?" Isn't ambergris created in the stomachs of sperm whales, presumably to protect their guts from the sharp beaks of their primary diet: squid? Blue whales have no teeth, subsist almost exclusively on tiny krill, and can't eat squid. What gives?
    Nobody on this board knows less about fragrance that I. However, I can use Google. I remain stumped about what BLUE WHALE AMBERGRIS is.

    Can anybody explain this?

  59. #59

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    AMBERGRIS

    am∑ber∑gris Audio pronunciation of "AMBERGRIS" ( P ) Pronunciation Key (mbr-grs, -grs)
    n.

    A waxy grayish substance formed in the intestines of sperm whales and found floating at sea or washed ashore. It is added to perfumes to slow down the rate of evaporation.


    Main Entry: am∑ber∑gris
    Pronunciation: 'am-b&r-"gris, -"grE(s)
    Function: noun
    : a waxy substance found floating in or on the shores of tropical waters, believed to originate in the intestines of the sperm whale, and used in perfumery as a fixative


    AMBERGRIS

    n : waxy substance secreted by the sperm whale and found floating at sea or washed ashore; used in perfume

  60. #60

    Default Re: Green Irish Tweed

    Just wanted to thank scentemental for helping to answer my question!
    I was also thinking a shower smell must be pretty subjective, there's something different about this one for me though; it's not the florals or clean smell exactly. Hmmm how can I put this. Okay, when you've just gotten out of the shower, yes you can smell the freshness of whatever you used. However, you can also smell the moisture in the air, and that smell is what really amplifies all the other smells to make them that much more fresh. That's what I get when I smell GIT, it's like all the notes are being suspended in moisture. I think I'll have to smell all the individual notes in GIT to see if I can pin it down lol.

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