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  1. #1

    Default A question about sillage & longevity

    I've been in the fragrance scene for many years now but not until recently have I really taken it more seriously and started to really analyze my scents. I used to kind of wear 'stuff that smelled good.'

    Well, I'll get to the point: regarding longevity, a lot of you guys talk about fragrances that last 3, 6, 9 hours etc. but what I'm not sure of is about the sillage. In the hours that you all smell the fragrance, is that referring to just smelling it in the air around you? Or is it if you put your wrist up to your nose and taking a sniff?

    I'm asking because my nose normally gets so stuffed full of 'fragrance' after 5 - 10 minutes that I can't even smell my own scent around myself unless I bring my wrist up to my nose.

  2. #2

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    "sillage" is the french word for "wake" as in the wake of a ship, and in fragrance, refers to the olefactory wake that you leave behind as you move about. Some fragrances have a strong sillage, others can be smelled only when one is "close to the skin".

    Hope this helps...
    Cordially,

    Serge

  3. #3

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    Thanks for the quick reply!

    This secpmd question may sound silly but say I'm wearing a fragrance and it's 6 hours later, would good longevity mean it can still be smelt around me? or just up close?

    Most of the time, I can smell most fragrances on my skin up to 12 hours later but that's because I put my wrist right up to my nose. I doubt anyone around me could smell it 12 hours later though..

  4. #4

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    To me longevity is how long you can smell it and sillage is how far away someone else can smell it (irregardless of how long it lasts).

    I increase longevity by layering it with the bath product line and by carrying it with me and reapplying at midday and at the end of the work day. For close to the skin fragrances, I increase the sillage by spraying on my shirt.

  5. #5

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    Longevity and sillage are two different things. I can have a scent that lasts 12 hours on me but its sillage will only be appreciable for the first 4. Most of my scents are like that. Sillage usually resides in the top and middle notes. From my experience, the drydown stays closer to the skin. On the other hand, scents like A*men are an exception.

  6. #6

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    MikeFromManhattan,
    thanks for the advice! I've always been a little skeptical about wearing fragrances on my clothes because I heard they can stain but I'll give your suggestion a shot and try it on some darker shirts

  7. #7

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    I've never had any problems with stains on my shirts, especially since they get washed after each wear.

  8. #8

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    Taking your advice, I wore Bvlgari PH (a very light scent, as many of you know) today but took note to give myself an extra spray AFTER putting my shirt on.

    Now, the difference wasn't profound but it was there! I noticed it more sillage and it seemed to have lasted longer as well. Of course, this can all be placebo resulting from my wanting to verify your advice but.. who cares! So far, it works and I'm happy

    Thanks again for the advice

  9. #9

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeFromManhattan
    To me longevity is how long you can smell it and sillage is how far away someone else can smell it (irregardless of how long it lasts).

    I increase longevity by layering it with the bath product line and by carrying it with me and reapplying at midday and at the end of the work day. For close to the skin fragrances, I increase the sillage by spraying on my shirt.

    Even though I've been reading that sillage and longetivity are two distinct features of a cologne, they must be related very strongly, no?

    It seems that if a fragrance in high in sillage (meaning you can smell it from far away) it might be because it is highly concentrated and naturally those fragrances will also last longer.

    On the other hand, if a cologne has weak sillage (meaning it wears closer to the skin) then these fragrances usually have low longevity.

    I would like my fragrance to be subtle and not overpowering. I don't want people to know my entrance from a mile away. At the same time, I don't want to spray my cologne 3 times a day for it to last.

    Are there colognes that have low sillage (wears close to the skin) AND have high longevity?

    Or do these colognes not exist?

  10. #10

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    Those fragrance do exist!

    For example, my favorite scent Chanel Pour Monsieur is an example of low sillage but high longevity.

    I love how it's like that - it makes the scent oh so much more intimate because the other person has to be real close in order to smell it!

    I won't project the scent, but it will last quite a while.

  11. #11

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    Actually, I found that a high sillage fragrance usually has low longevity and vice versa. This can be tested in Hanae Mori edt and the edp, the eau de toilette has more sillage but less longevity, whereas the eau de parfum (higher concentration of fragrance oils) will have less sillage but great longevity, it will just stay closer to the skin.
    .

  12. #12

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    Jaipur EDP has little sillage for me, but lasts forever.

  13. #13

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    Here's another two related questions: How does sillage relate to the alcohol content in a fragrance ?, Are sillage and projection equivalent, or those are different concepts ?
    « L'odeur de rose, faible, grâce au vent léger d'été qui passe, se mêle aux parfums qu'elle a mis.»
    [ Paul Verlaine ]
    Wardrobe

  14. #14

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    If you want to spray clothes without staining, lay your shirt on the bed and spray the cologne 2-3 feet above the shirt. This way it is a fine mist by the time it reaches the shirt, so no one spot gets enough cologne to do any damage. I'd say in general, cotton and wool are not a problem for spraying cologne while delicate synthetic fibers or silk are the most dangerous.

    For longevity without sillage - Geir and Gendarme (all the gendarmes in fact) are perfect examples.

    A trick to tone down the sillage of powerful scent is to spray it somewhere that is covered by clothing (chest, inside elbows with a long sleeve shirt) so that the fragrance escapes a little bit at a time as you move around, but does not steadily radiate off of you.

    Hope the suggestions help.

  15. #15

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    Another long-lasting one that doesn't project in Dana Monsieur Musk. Twice I wore it to bed and both times, the fragrance was still there twelve hours later. And it's dirt cheap! ;D
    No longer offering decants. Sorry!

  16. #16

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandalwood
    Here's another two related questions: How does sillage relate to the alcohol content in a fragrance ?, Are sillage and projection equivalent, or those are different concepts ?
    What I think you're asking is the perfume content (as many fragrances can contain 5% perfum, 80% alcohol and what about the last 15%? usually some sort of filler)

    With higher perfume content (i.e. EDP), you get a stronger, longer lasting fragrance than the same fragrance with lower perfume content (i.e. EDT).

    I normally purchase EDT because it is not as expensive and I like to wear my fragrances more subtly as well.

    However, there are certain fragrances that present different notes between EDP and EDT versions. I think there's an ongoing thread right now comparing Habit Rouge EDP and EDT.

    I hope this helps

  17. #17

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    Thank you myaccolades.

    Well actually I was suggesting that sillage might be related to the amount of alcohol in a fragrance, the alcohol being the transmitting and projecting agent.

    I was thinking in essential oils, that they normally don't project well or leave a substantial sillage (but in revenge they last forever very close to the skin) and I assume it is because of the lack of alcohol. But it is just a thought.
    « L'odeur de rose, faible, grâce au vent léger d'été qui passe, se mêle aux parfums qu'elle a mis.»
    [ Paul Verlaine ]
    Wardrobe

  18. #18

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    I've always believed that the alcohol was simply the carrying agent of the fragrance. It evaporates in approximately 5 seconds and leaves the perfume evening distributed whereever the perfume-alcohol was applied.

    I could be wrong, however.

  19. #19

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by myaccolades
    It evaporates in approximately 5 seconds and leaves the perfume evening distributed whereever the perfume-alcohol was applied.
    I'm not quite sure that the alcohol evaporates that fast, I suspect that the different fixatives that are used prevent it by regulating the evaporation rate.

    Again, I'm just speculating and can be wrong as well.
    « L'odeur de rose, faible, grâce au vent léger d'été qui passe, se mêle aux parfums qu'elle a mis.»
    [ Paul Verlaine ]
    Wardrobe

  20. #20

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    Nah, alcohol evaporates extremely fast once exposed to air - especially if it's spread over a surface. i.e. rubbing alcohol

  21. #21

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    The alcohol is indeed just an agent to deliver the perfume oils to your skin (or wherever). The alcohol evaporates very quickly and doesn't contribute anything to the scent. The reason you always see the SA spray on a scent strip and wave it in the air before handing it to you is to help dry the alcohol faster.

    Strickly speaking, accolades is correct, it is the percentage of perfume oils that govern the strength of a fragrance. In a sense, you could say the part of the juice that is not perfume is alcohol, so the two are complimentary, however it is more common to speak of the perfume content than the alcohol content. I think alcohol is used as the storing/delivery agent because it is sterile, universally safe, and evaporates quickly with little or no smell of it's own.

  22. #22

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    Kinda funny,of all the scents I wear to work,people have a good reaction to it,but are ever so careful not to say anything.
    I had to poop today at work,I was amazed at how many people commented on it's sillage and longevity.

  23. #23

    Default Re: A question about sillage & longevity

    LOL!!!! I need to introduce you to my friend, Curtis E. Flush. [smiley=lolk.gif]
    No longer offering decants. Sorry!

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