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  1. #31

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    Quote Originally Posted by Vibrant_Violet
    Hi Jeff;

    I think I know what you mean by the purest mysore sandalwood. Almost 4-5 hours after applying Trumper on my skin (sort of when I'd even forgotten applying it on my skin), I finally noticed this pure sandalwood note coming up from my wrist. It's truly beautiful as you said. But again, the top-middle note of this fragrance is so crowded that it just keeps reminding me of Coco (Chanel)..... Is there any fragrance which just has this beautiful mysore sandalwood, without this Coco note? Or might I just as well go for sandalwood oil? The followings are the sandalwoods I've tried so far. At this point, my favorite is Tam Dao. I just like the combination of cumin and sandalwood. Do you have any others you can recommend in terms of beautiful sandalwood? I would truly appreciate your advice, because I feel like I'm "stuck" and "lost" in my journey looking for ideal sandalwood, at this point. Thanks!

    Santal (L'Artisan), Santal Imperial (Creed), Sandalo (Lorenzo Villoresi), Santal Noble (MPG), Tam Dao (Duptyque), 10 Corso Como, Sandalo (Etro), Sandalwood (Crabtree&Evelyn), Santal Blanc (Serge Lutens), Santal (Floris), Sandalwood (Floris), Sandalwood (Trumper) and Sandalwood (The Art of Shaving).

    P.S. *Did you ever try an IUNX fragrance called L'Ether? I heard that this one had nice sandalwood also, though I've never tried.


    Out of all the sandalwoods that i own.the one that smells the closest to Mysore oil is LV's. Especially after it drys down.

    A couple more you may want to try (if you don't mind oils) are Madini's Santal Blanc and Attar Bazaar's Mysore Sandalwood oil. Both are amazing!!

    I do have samples of the whole Iunx line and although L'Ether has sandalwood in the base,i personaly do not think of it as a 'sandalwood' fragrance. Its reminds me of a more woody Passage d'Enfer without the lilies.

    Jeff
    "You can ignore reality, but you can't ignore the consequences of ignoring reality." - Ayn Rand

    "I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical...It is a medicine necessary for the sound health of government." - Thomas Jefferson

  2. #32

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    Hey Jeff;

    Thanks for the great info!

    I think Passage d'Enfer (and Ginestat Le Boise), to my nose, smell more like frankinsence/myrrhe than sandalwood (though they smell great). I was considering purchasing L'Ether blindly, but, thanks to your feedback, let me just hold at this pont then...

    Madini's Santal Blanc? Attar Bazaar's Mysore Sandalwood oil? Wow. I've never heard of them....... I am looking at the website of Attar Bazaar now. Very interesting! What about other sandalwood products they have, like Arabian, Egyptian, and Tunisian sandalwood? Also, how do you use oil, by the way? Do you dilute with alcohol? I used to have sandalwood oil from Body Shop, but I just had no idea how to use it.

    Thanks again!



  3. #33

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    Quote Originally Posted by Vibrant_Violet
    Also, how do you use oil, by the way? Do you dilute with alcohol? *


    I just put it on straight. But just remember, like parfums, oils stay closer to the skin (less sillage) but they last (most do) forever.
    "You can ignore reality, but you can't ignore the consequences of ignoring reality." - Ayn Rand

    "I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical...It is a medicine necessary for the sound health of government." - Thomas Jefferson

  4. #34

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    Quote Originally Posted by Vibrant_Violet
    Hey Jeff;

    Also, how do you use oil, by the way? Do you dilute with alcohol? I used to have sandalwood oil from Body Shop, but I just had no idea how to use it.
    Just be aware Vibrant_Violet, if you happen to acquire pure sandalwood oil, you shouldn't apply the product directly to the skin as it is extremely irritant. You will have to dilute it in a carrier (like flaxseed oil, for instance) in a proportion of 2 % pure sandalwood oil and 98 % carrier agent.

    There are several places in the net where you can find excellent, pure Mysore sandalwood oil.
    « L'odeur de rose, faible, grâce au vent léger d'été qui passe, se mêle aux parfums qu'elle a mis.»
    [ Paul Verlaine ]
    Wardrobe

  5. #35

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    Hi Sandalwood!

    Thanks for the info! As I wrote above, I used to have s small bottle of Body Shop sandalwood oil before, but it was long time ago and I don't even remember what it smelled like...... Well. I have to confess I had a bad experience with patchouli oil. There was a time when I was crazy about patchouli, and one day I bought a small bottle of patchouli oil, expecting it might smell as wonderful as those patchouli notes from some fagrances I liked. To my chagrin, I found the direct smell from patchouli oil bottle almost repulsive! To my further chagrin, when I tried to apply it directly onto my wrist, I accidentally dropped the bottle onto the floor. None could enter my room next several weeks...... My point is I really didn't know how to play with oil. So you recommend 2% dilution with some medium? That sounds interesting. Generally speaking (i.e. not just for mysore sandalwood), which sandalwood oil (which brand, etc) would you recommend? I guess these hand-made sandalwood colognes smell more straightforward sandalwoody than even Tam Dao and Floris Sandalwood, but would they smell better, actually? Again, I have never played with sandalwood oil and am getting very curious. Can you share your experience with me, Sndalwood? Thanks.

    VV

  6. #36

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    I have a small bottle (10 ml) of pure Mysore Sandalwood oil which is incredibly great, you can get it at:

    http://www.scents-of-earth.com/scent...ndalwood5.html

    I bought a little 30 ml empty bottle in which I put 0.5 ml of this pure sandalwood oil and 24.5 ml of flaxseed oil. The result is an amazing sandalwood scent that I use almost every day; I normally put some on my wrists and some on my temple. It stays very close to my skin, so I'm the only one able to smell it. This scent resembles, in a way, the combined dry down of LV Sandalo and Tam Dao.

    Talking about handmade sandalwood colognes, this is an interesting one that I'm envisioning to acquire:


    http://www.profumo.it/perfume/prodot...91&lang=en
    « L'odeur de rose, faible, grâce au vent léger d'été qui passe, se mêle aux parfums qu'elle a mis.»
    [ Paul Verlaine ]
    Wardrobe

  7. #37

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    Hi Sandalwood;

    Thanks for the info. Oil (even if diluted) lasts much longer than alcohol-based fragrance, doesn't it?

    Let me ask you a very basic question. How many different kinds of sandalwood oils are there? Not in terms of different brands, but as for different spicies. When I checked the Attar Bazaar site, they have Arabian, Tunisian, Egyptian and Mysore sandalwood. Each has a brief description, but it does not really tell me the difference. When we say "sandalwood " as ingredients for fragrance, does it usually mean mysore sandalwood? Will you give me a small lecture about different sandalwood species?

    Thanks.

    VV

  8. #38

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    212 men smells almost totally like sandalwood to me

  9. #39

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    Just be aware Vibrant_Violet, if you happen to acquire pure sandalwood oil, you shouldn't apply the product directly to the skin as it is extremely irritant.
    I was not aware that Sandalwood oil was an irritant, much less an extreme irritant. I don't believe that statement is correct. Perhaps you are the one person in the world to whom sandalwood oil is an irritant.
    All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

  10. #40

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    Quote Originally Posted by dcampen
    Just be aware Vibrant_Violet, if you happen to acquire pure sandalwood oil, you shouldn't apply the product directly to the skin as it is extremely irritant.
    I was not aware that Sandalwood oil was an irritant, much less an extreme irritant. I don't believe that statement is correct. Perhaps you are the one person in the world to whom sandalwood oil is an irritant.
    dcampen, are you sure you've been exposed to pure and undiluted sandalwood oil ? I have been and can tell you it really is irritant on the skin.
    « L'odeur de rose, faible, grâce au vent léger d'été qui passe, se mêle aux parfums qu'elle a mis.»
    [ Paul Verlaine ]
    Wardrobe

  11. #41

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    Hi Vibrant_Violet !

    Some years ago, work took me in a trip to the middle east where I had the opportunity to try some (but not all) different varieties of sandalwood. I've got a few comments and perceptions, very subjective I agree, that I can share:

    The sandalwood tree (Santalum album L) grows mainly in Asia, specifically South and Southeast Asia: Cambodia, Malaysia, Indonesia, Vietnam, and Thailand although the one produced in India is and has been reputed to be of the finest quality.

    In India, the sandalwood is primarily distributed on the Deccan Plateau ( "Deccan" in Sanskrit translates as "the south&quot, where the states of Karnataka (Mysore) and Tamil Nadu are located. The sandalwood of Mysore is very, smooth and gentle, balsamic and earthy, truly delicate and complex whereas the Tamil Nadu sandalwood is richer, creamy and has a bit of a turpentine note.

    There are also other sandalwood species in other countries, for example Australia (S. spicatum or Eucarya spicata) which tends to be very resinous and with a dry-woody base note, or the West Indies (Amyris balsamifera L ).The sandalwood obtained from these species is quite harsh and with a somewhat bitter quality.

    I've heard also about the Egyptian Sandalwood, Tunisian Sandalwood and Arabian Sandalwood, although I'm not sure about their quality or if they produce any, as these countries are amongst the largest importers of sandalwood (along with the US and some EU countries).

    Nowadays, the production of sandalwood in India and specially in the Mysore region is closely supervised and regulated by the government of this country, thus, considering the growing sandalwood of Mysore oil offer in the market I suspect much of the higher quality products available must likely originate, at best, in the rest of the Deccan Plateau outside Karnataka (i. e. Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Andhra Pradesh) or in some other cases, Indonesia and Australia.
    « L'odeur de rose, faible, grâce au vent léger d'été qui passe, se mêle aux parfums qu'elle a mis.»
    [ Paul Verlaine ]
    Wardrobe

  12. #42

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    they have Arabian, Tunisian, Egyptian and Mysore sandalwood. Each has a brief description, but it does not really tell me the difference.
    These names are "conceptualizations" and have little, if any, literal meaning. There is no sandalwood oil produced in Arabia, Tunisia or Egypt. There is sandalwood oil produced in East Indian which is sometimes called Mysore sandalwood oil but even here when the term is used in a fragrance description it is likely that it is being used conceptually and not literally.

    When we say "sandalwood " as ingredients for fragrance, does it usually mean mysore sandalwood? Will you give me a small lecture about different sandalwood species?
    This is from the EdenBotanicals web site:
    The Sandalwood Tree: Sandalwood products are obtained from the sandalwood tree (Santalum album), which is a member of the Santalaceae family. It is known as white sandalwood, Mysore sandalwood, East Indian sandalwood, sandal, Chandan (Hindi), and tan xiang (Mandarin). The white sandalwood is an evergreen tree which grows to 50 feet. It naturally occurs in Eastern India in the states of Mysore, Kerala, Tamil Nadu and Karnatika. It grows in a dry and rocky environment and reproduces by suckers and by seeds. The environmental conditions required by this tree are rather strict and not completely understood. Due to a combination of the environmental requirements and the necessity of living off a host plant, sandalwood is not easy to propagate. Even so it has been long cultivated in other Southeast Asian locations, including Indonesia which produces some good quality essential oil.


    Sandalwood is a parasitic tree, which obtains nutrients from several other plant species. While there are other species of sandalwood, including red sandalwood, Australian sandalwood (S. spicaum) and New Caledonian sandalwood (S. austrocaledonicum), these are quite different than true Santalum album and have very different properties and fragrances. There is another tree that yields an essential oil which is sometimes called West Indian sandalwood or amyris (Amyris balsamifera). It is from Haiti and other islands in the West Indies and is not related to true sandalwood. It is however, sometimes used as a sandalwood substitute especially in products such as sandalwood soap, where using the true sandalwood would be too expensive.


    http://www.edenbotanicals.com/about_sandal.html

    So, the only true sandalwood oil comes from the tree Santalum album which grows in SE Asia, particularly East India. This oil is commonly called Mysore Sandalwood or East Indian Sandalwood.

    The oil from the related Australian species, S. spicatum, is, in my opinion worthless as a sandalwood oil substitute. The oil from S. austrocaledonicum is similar to Indian sandalwood oil but has some burnt topnotes. The Amyris oil bears no resemblance to real Indian Sandalwood.

    There is also a tree called red sandalwood and I have seen "red sandalwood oil" listed in fragrances but this is a pure conceptualization and has no literal meaning.
    All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

  13. #43

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    dcampen, are you sure you've been exposed to pure and undiluted sandalwood oil ?
    Yes, I am very certain. I have samples from a half dozen sources, some going back 30 years.


    I have been and can tell you it really is irritant on the skin.
    This is the first I have ever heard of this. I guess with all the people in the world there are bound to be some allergic to most anything. You must be one of the very rare few who is allergic to sandalwood oil.
    All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

  14. #44

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    I checked "The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils" by Julia Lawless and she lists sandalwood oil as being "non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing".
    All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

  15. #45

    Default Re: commercial sandalwood?

    Hi Sandalwood and Dcampen;

    Thanks for all the info. There's always something new I can learn every day!

    VV

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